Tag Archives: FDA

Washington state senate approves bill mandating abortion coverage

abortion-rights
Demorats: Making sure somebody pays for (my body) my choice.
From MyNorthwest.com: The Washington State Senate approved a bill that would require health insurers covering maternity care to also cover abortions.
“Washington has long led the way on this issue, and passing the Reproductive Parity Act (RPA) will be yet another example of that,” said state Sen. Steve Hobbs (D-Lake Stevens), who introduced the bill this legislative session in Olympia. “It should pass, and we should move quickly on it because these days it’s really anybody’s guess as to what the Trump administration will or won’t do next.”
Hobbs, along with Rep. Eileen Cody (D-Seattle), in the House, have introduced this bill in the upper chamber for years, but it hasn’t passed despite some bi-partisan support. When it was first discussed in 2012, it failed 26-23. With Democrats recently taking control of the Washington state Senate, Hobbs believes that the shift in power will lead to swift passage.
Washington state already has laws in places that protects reproductive health rights; voters passed an initiative in 1991 that would keep protections in place for women in the event that Roe v. Wade is overturned. What SB 6219 focuses on is affordability of coverage.
The average cost for an abortion is around $650, and the monthly income of a full-time, low-wage worker in the Puget Sound region is $1,400, according to The Northwest Abortion Access Fund – an organization that helps women pay for care.
Activists say that this bill is a step forward to help alleviate the cost of an abortion for many women so they don’t have to seek additional financial help. It would also set up a type of reimbursement program for women — including non-citizens — without insurance or who are on Medicaid.
But some families will still be left with high deductibles. Also, when a woman passes a certain point age of pregnancy, the cost increases.
But right now, Rogers (I don’t know who this Rogers person is; not previously identified in this article) says with facing potentially harmful federal restrictions under the Trump administration on funding for legal abortion, the RPA would make sure that state law applies as broadly as possible without violating those restrictions.
Some believe taxpayers aren’t responsible for funding this
Human Life of Washington — a right to life group — strongly opposes RPA. Its government relations expert Sarah Davenport-Smith says it forces taxpayers who are against contraception and abortion to pay for something they don’t support.
According to Davenport-Smith, while abortions and abortifacient drugs are legal, there is no requirement for taxpayers to fund them.
Why supporters think this needs to pass now
The political climate is also why the bill covers several rules for birth control access, said Executive Director Tiffany Hankins of NARAL Pro-Choice Washington, a chapter of a national organization that supports women making personal decisions about their reproductive health.
Many of these rules ensuring contraceptive equity and affordability already exist through the Washington state insurance commissioner’s office. Under their rules, most health plans currently must cover Food and Drug Administration-approved contraceptive methods prescribed by their in-network medical provider, and this is without people having to deal with copays, deductibles, and coinsurance.
But having these rules in a bill would strengthen those rules. People could see changes as soon as 2019 if the bill passes. It specifically applies to a health plan issued or renewed on Jan. 1, 2019.
Read the rest of the story here.
DCG

Please follow and like us:
error0
 

New diet guidelines might reflect environment cost

cow farting
MyNorthwest.com: For years, the government has been issuing guidelines about healthy eating choices. Now, a panel that advises the Agriculture Department is ready to recommend that you be told not only what foods are better for your own health, but for the environment as well.
That means that when the latest version of the government’s dietary guidelines comes out, it may push even harder than it has in recent years for people to choose more fruits, vegetables, nuts, whole grains and other plant-based foods — at the expense of meat.
The beef and agriculture industries are crying foul, saying an environmental agenda has no place in what has always been a practical blueprint for a healthy lifestyle.
The advisory panel has been discussing the idea of sustainability in public meetings, indicating that its recommendations, expected early this year, may address the environment. A draft recommendation circulated last month said a sustainable diet helps ensure food access for both the current population and future generations.
A dietary pattern higher in plant-based foods and lower in animal-based foods is “more health promoting and is associated with lesser environmental impact than is the current average U.S. diet,” the draft said.
That appears to take at least partial aim at the beef industry. A study by the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences last year said raising beef for the American dinner table is more harmful to the environment than other meat industries such as pork and chicken.
The study said that compared with other popular animal proteins, beef produces more heat-trapping gases per calorie, puts out more water-polluting nitrogen, takes more water for irrigation and uses more land.
As the advisory committee has discussed the idea, doctors and academics on the panel have framed sustainability in terms of conserving food resources and also what are the healthiest foods. There is “compatibility and overlap” between what’s good for health and good for the environment, the panel says.
Once the recommendations are made, the Agriculture and Health and Human Services departments will craft the final dietary guidelines, expected about a year from now. Published every five years, the guidelines are the basis for USDA’s “My Plate” icon that replaced the well-known food pyramid in 2010 and is designed to help Americans with healthy eating. Guidelines will also be integrated into school lunch meal patterns and other federal eating programs.
The meat industry has fought for years to ensure that the dietary guidelines do not call for eating less meat. The guidelines now recommend eating lean meats instead of reducing meat altogether, advice that the current advisory committee has debated. A draft discussed at the panel’s Dec. 15 meeting says a healthy dietary pattern includes fewer “red and processed meats” than are currently consumed.
In response, the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association sent out a statement by doctor and cattle producer Richard Thorpe calling the committee biased and the draft meat recommendations absurd. He said lean beef has a role in healthy diets.
The American Meat Institute issued a statement calling any attempt to take lean meat out of a healthy dietary pattern “stunning” and “arbitrary.” Objections are coming from Congress, too.
A massive year-end spending bill enacted last month noted the advisory committee’s interest in the environment and directed Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack “to only include nutrition and dietary information, not extraneous factors” in final guidelines. Congress often uses such non-binding directions to put a department on notice that lawmakers will push back if the executive branch moves forward.
Environmentalists are pushing the committee and the government to go the route being considered. “We need to make sure our diets are in alignment with our natural resources and the need to reduce climate change,” said Kari Hamerschlag of the advocacy group Friends of the Earth.
Michael Jacobson of the Center for Science in the Public Interest said the idea of broader guidelines isn’t unprecedented. They have already been shaped to address physical activity and food safety, he said. “You don’t want to recommend a diet that is going to poison the planet,” he said.

Oops! The Obamas caught poisoning the planet...

Oops! The Obamas caught poisoning the planet…


DCG

Please follow and like us:
error0
 

FDA Moves to Ban Cake, Donut ‘Sprinkles’

Out of my cold dead hands!

Out of my cold dead hands!


Breitbart: Early next year, the FDA is expected to finalize a new regulation intended to eradicate even trace amounts of partially hydrogenated oils, known as trans fats, from our diets.
Although the amount of trans fats Americans consume has declined significantly in recent years, the FDA’s quest to completely eliminate a particular type of trans fat threatens to eliminate the noble “sprinkle,” used to decorate holiday treats and donuts. Even a small amount of joy is suspect in the FDA’s brave, new, food-monitored world.
In recent years, research has determined that consuming large amounts of trans fats is harmful to the heart. Trans fats have been in the American diet since the 1950s, but recent awareness of its health risks have pushed food companies and restaurants to minimize its use. Today, Americans consume just 1.3 grams of trans fats a day, around 0.6% of total caloric intake. No research has shown this level of consumption to pose any risk.
The proposed FDA action underscores the challenge of a permanent bureaucracy. Having succeeded in removing the risk that may arise from consuming large amounts of trans fats, the FDA extends its mission to eliminate even trace amounts, which may provide little in the way of improved health. Toxicity is determined by the dose, not the agent. Even water can kill if it is consumed in great quantities.
A small amount of trans fats appear naturally in many foods. The new FDA rule would allow these, but broaden its regulatory dragnet to prohibit the very small amounts of artificial trans fats used to prolong the shelf life of many frozen foods, baked goods and, yes, sprinkles.
At this juncture, it bears repeating that a large reason trans fats used to be so prevalent in our diets was due to the activism of the food nannies at Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI). The left-wing food scolds, most famous for its reports on “calorie bomb” food entrees, pushed restaurants and food companies to switch to trans fats in the 1980s and 1990s.
As research mounted that trans fats were possibly unhealthy, CSPI dismissed these concerns as “rumors.” Trans fats, the group concluded, “seem relatively innocent.” The groups nutrition director even concluded, “The bottom line, trans…schmans.” The group has since completely reversed their views and today raises millions of dollars to agitate for bans of the very products they once promoted.
This Christmas, don’t pass up those holiday cookies or cupcakes with the festive sprinkles. They may soon be a distant memory we have to explain to our grandchildren.
govt food police
DCG

Please follow and like us:
error0
 

The 10 Plagues of America

“By this you will know I am the Lord.” –Exodus 7:17

Plague #1: Mayflies in mississippi river valley

Meghan DeMaria reports for TheWeek that every year mayflies leave the Mississippi River after one or two years of incubation, living for up to 36 hours before they return to the water, lay a new crop of eggs, and die.
However, this year’s mayfly hatch in the Mississippi River reached Biblical proportions and caused a bow echo on the National Weather Service (NWS) radar.
The La Crosse, Wisconsin branch of the NWS reports that the mayflies caused a three-vehicle car crash as they descended over the town. Two people were injured in the crash, and one was treated at a local hospital.
Below are two horrifying pics taken by Wisconsin residents of the millions and millions of flies:

Mayflies plagueMayfly plague

Plague #2: Antibiotics-resistant Superbugs

Mark Koba reports for CNBC, July 24, 2014, that cases of the contagious and deadly “superbug” known as CRE or Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae increased five-fold in community hospitals from 2008 to 2012 in the Southeastern U.S., according to a new study published in the August issue of the medical journal, Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology.
CRE is known as a “superbug” because the bacterium has a high mortality rate of 50% and because its various strains are mostly resistant to antibiotics. CRE usually strikes people in hospitals, nursing homes and other health centers, transferred from a patient to the hands of a care provider like a doctor or nurse, and from their hands to another patient. An estimated 9,300 people in the U.S. are infected by CRE every year, resulting in around 600 deaths.
Adding to the concern is a recent report by the University of Washington School of Public Health that another antibiotic-resistant superbug, MRSA or Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, had been found in firehouses in Washington state.
Researchers /tested 33 firehouses for the presence of MRSA. The bug was found at 19 of those firehouses on ambulances, trucks and on kitchen surfaces. Twelve crews reported having at least one member who had gotten an infection requiring medical care. No deaths have been reported.
MRSA causes a range of illnesses, from skin and wound infections to pneumonia and bloodstream infections that can cause sepsis and death.
Anyone can get MRSA through direct contact with an infected wound or by sharing personal items such as towels or razors that have touched infected skin.
There are more than 80,000 cases of MRSA detected each year in the U.S., with a reported 11,285 deaths.
All in all, there are at least 2 million illnesses reported each year from the various superbugs, resulting in more than 23,000 deaths, according to the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).
Medical experts say that the overuse of antibiotics in humans and animals has led to the spread of superbugs. Antibiotics are often used in livestock as a preventive measure. 80% of all the antibiotics sold in the United States are used in livestock production.
Perversely, that overuse is likely to continue in animals after a panel of the U.S. Second Court of Appeals ruled on July 24 that the Food and Drug Administration does not have to consider banning the practice of feeding antibiotics to animals that are not sick.
There are calls for stronger antibiotics to deal with the superbug spread. But Dr. Joshua Thaden, a Boston-based specialist in infectious disease, says that’s likely to just continue the vicious cycle of drug resistance because “the bacteria could end up resisting them as well.”

Plague #3: airborne pneumonic plague in Colorado

There are three main types of plague:

  1. Septicemic plague occurs when the bacteria proliferates in the bloodstream.
  2. Bubonic plague takes hold underneath the skin.
  3. Pneumonic plague, the most serious, is airborne and can be spread through coughing and sneezing when the bacteria enters the lungs.

Plague in all of its forms usually infects an average of seven people yearly in the U.S., and is found mostly in the western states of Arizona, New Mexico and Colorado, according to the CDC.
Sonali Basak and Jennifer Oldham report for Bloomberg, July 18, 2014, that a week after a Colorado man was found on July 11 to be infected with the deadly pneumonic plague, three more cases were found — the deadliest form of the disease reported in Colorado in a decade. 
All four cases may be linked to the original man’s dog, which died from the illness. Health officials suspect the dog might have been exposed to plague-infected fleas from a prairie dog or rabbit, said Jennifer House, a spokeswoman for the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment department.

While the first victim is still hospitalized, the three subsequent cases were treated with antibiotics, recovered, and are no longer contagious.

Plague #4: Mosquito-borne Chikungunya virus

Meredith Engel reports for the New York Daily News, July 23, 2014, that Chikungunya is a painful virus spread by mosquitoes, for which there is no vaccine or treatment.
The recent Chikungunya epidemic began late last year in the Caribbean, then spread to Florida, then across the United States, with nearly 600 people reported to be infected.
The virus seldom kills its victims. Those infected often come down with a fever and significant joint pain, but heal in about a week.
Chikungunya, discovered in Africa 60 years ago, can’t spread human to human. The best way to ward off the disease is to take precautions against mosquito bites by using repellent with DEET, wearing light-colored clothing with long sleeves and pants when venturing outdoors, draining any standing water around the house, and staying indoors at dusk and dawn when mosquitoes are most plentiful.

Plague #5: Worst Drought in a Century in California

The nightmarish multi-year drought in the state of California continues to get even worse.
This week it was reported that 81% of California is now experiencing “extreme drought” or worse. Three months ago, that number was just 68%. Downtown Los Angeles is now the driest it has been since rain records began in 1877.
For more, please see Michael Snyder’s article, “20 Signs The Epic Drought In The Western United States Is Starting To Become Apocalyptic” and FOTM’s “California to have state-wide mandatory water restrictions Aug. 1.”

Plague #6: Wildfires in Western USA

Massive wildfires in Washington, Oregon and western Canada have spread clouds of smoke over vast areas of the northwest United States in recent days.
CNN reports, July 20, 2014, that four wildfires spanning almost 170,000 acres are driving hundreds of people from their homes in Washington state and across the border in Canada. The flames have encroached on towns. An estimated 80 homes were destroyed and cell phone service was knocked out

Plague #7: Swine Virus Killing Millions Of U.S. Pigs

The New York Times reports (via CNBC) that a deadly virus, porcine epidemic diarrhea or PEDv, is estimated to have killed more than 100,000 piglets and young hogs each week since it first showed up in Iowa in May 2013, wreaking havoc on the U.S. pork industry.
PEDv causes acute diarrhea that is virtually 100% lethal for piglets two to three weeks old. Paul Sundberg, vice president for science and technology at the National Pork Board, said, “I’ve been a vet since 1981, and there is no precedent for this. It is devastatingly virulent.”
The swine virus appeared in the United States last spring in Ohio and in weeks had spread to four more states. How it entered the U.S. is unknown, but the suspicion is that the virus came from China.
As a result of the deadly swine virus, the U.S. Agriculture Department says the number of hogs slaughtered this year is down 4.2% to roughly 50 million from more than 52 million in the same period in 2013. That, in turn, drove up the price of bacon by more than 15% and center-cut pork chops by almost 13% in May, compared with the same period a year ago, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.
Precisely how many pigs have died from the virus is unknown. The Agriculture Department did not require reporting of the disease until June 5, and it does not collect data on how many pigs the virus has killed, instead referring the question to the hog industry — which does not like to talk about it. The National Pork Producers Council does not have a figure of its own but said it had heard that about 8 million pigs had died of PEDv so far and approximately 100,000 more are dying each week.

Plague #8: Citrus Greening

Citrus greeningCitrus greening or huanglongbing is a disease spread by an invasive pest, the Asian citrus psyllid, which is sweeping across the citrus-producing regions of the world.
Kevin Loria reports for Business Insider, July 18, 2014, that at least 70% of Florida’s citrus trees are already infected by the disease, resulting in Florida’s citrus crop this year being the lowest it’s been in 30 years. Orange-juice prices are up nearly 20% this year alone and will continue to rise. The disease was a major factor in the lime shortage that made the price of a box of Persian limes jump from $18 to $85 last December. Researchers and growers say that if a cure isn’t found, the entire $9 billion Florida citrus industry could be destroyed.

Plague #9: Bananas may go extinct from virulent Fungus

Mark Koba reports for CNBC, April 21, 2014, that the world’s supply of bananas is under attack from a fungus called Panama disease or Fusarium wilt that could wipe out the popular variety that Americans eat.
Randy Ploetz, a professor of plant pathology at the University of Florida who in 1989 originally discovered a strain of the Panama disease called TR4, said “It’s a very serious situation” that may be growing into a serious threat to U.S. and Latin American banana growers. “There’s nothing at this point that really keeps the fungus from spreading.”
Bananas are the 8th most important food crop in the world and the 4th most important food crop among the world’s poorest countries. Through trade and supply, bananas make up a global $8.9 billion trade industry. Bananas are grown in more than 150 countries, which produce 105 million tons of fruit per year, while employing hundreds of thousands pf people. The U.S. is the top importer of bananas in the world at nearly 4 million tons a year. The largest exporters of the fruit are Ecuador, the Philippines, Costa Rica, Guatemala and Colombia.

Plague #10: Fukushima radioactive water in Pacific ocean

Japan’s Fukushima nuclear disaster that began in 2011 is continuing.
Hundreds of tons of radioactive water are being released into the Pacific on a continual basis, and this could potentially affect our oceans and our food chain for generations to come. There is a lot of evidence that it should be taken very seriously in the U.S., but it isn’t. In fact, former MSNBC host Cenk Uygur has admitted that while he was at MSNBC he was instructed not to warn the public about the radiation coming from Fukushima. (See “36 Signs the Media is Lying to You About How Radiation From Fukushima is Affecting the West Coast.”)
Japanese physician Dr. Shigeru Mita says residents of Tokyo, especially children, are displaying disturbing signs of radiation sickness:

Since December 2011, I have conducted thyroid ultrasound examinations, thyroid function tests, general blood tests and biochemical tests on about 2000 people, mostly families in the Tokyo metropolitan area expressing concerns on the effects of radiation. I have observed that white blood cells, especially neutrophils, are decreasing among children under the age of 10. There are cases of significant decline in the number of neutrophils in 0-1 year-olds born after the earthquake (<1000). In both cases, conditions tend to improve by moving to Western Japan (Neutrophils 0–>4500). Patients report nosebleed, hair loss, lack of energy, subcutaneous bleeding, visible urinary hemorrhage, skin inflammations, coughs and various other non-specific symptoms.

Dr. Mita concludes that “It is clear that Eastern Japan and Metropolitan Tokyo have been contaminated with radiation” and recommends that the entire city of Tokyo be evacuated.
As if the above 10 plagues aren’t enough, given the ease of global travel and  porous national borders (see “Illegals bring pneumonia and swine flu to Calif-Texas Navy bases” and “Obama’s Brown Shirts threaten health workers who divulge infectious diseases brought by tidal wave of illegals into America”), the following 3 horrific plagues may sooner or later spread to the United States:

Plague #11: MERS mutates into airborne pathogen

Meghan DeMaria reports for TheWeek, July 22, 2014, that the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) has claimed at least 288 lives since its appearance in 2012.
Now, researchers at Saudi Arabia’s King Fahd Medical Research Center have evidence MERS may be airborne, after air samples from an infected camel barn tested positive for a strain of the viral genome MERS RNA. Reports also found that some infected people had close contacts with other MERS patients.

Plague #12: Bubonic plague

Rachel Rettner reports for Fox News, July 23, 2014, that after a man died last week from bubonic plague, Chinese officials have sealed off an entire city, Yumen, in northwest China, preventing about 30,000 residents from leaving the city.
The man became ill after he handled a dead marmot (a large wild rodent), and died last week from bubonic plague. No other cases of the plague have been reported, according to the Guardian. About 150 people who had contact with the plague victim have been placed under quarantine.
Bubonic plague is an infectious disease known for killing millions of people in Europe in the 1300s, in a pandemic called the Black Death. It is caused by the bacteria Yersinia pestis that is carried by rodents, and can be transmitted to people through flea bites or by direct contact with the tissues or fluids of an animal with plague, according to the CDC.
Bubonic plague causes swelling of the lymph nodes, and it cannot be spread from person to person. However, if the disease spreads to the lungs, the person can develop pneumonic plague (see Plague #3), which can be transmitted from person to person if a sick individual coughs droplets into the air, and another person inhales the droplets. But person-to-person transmission is rare, and usually requires close contact with the infected individual.
Today, bubonic plague is treatable with antibiotics, the CDC says. (See, however, Plague #2: Antibiotics-Resistant Superbugs!) Now there are fewer than 5,000 cases of plague per year worldwide, with most cases occurring in Africa, according to the Mayo Clinic.

Plague #13: Ebola

Ebola is one of the world’s deadliest viruses with a high fatality rate of 60% to 90%. There is no vaccine. There is no cure.
First identified in 1976 in the sub-Saharan jungles of Zaire and the Sudan, Ebola was transmitted to humans via the blood or bodily fluids of an infected fruit bat or monkey.
Symptoms typical of an Ebola infection begin 2 days to 3 weeks after contacting the virus — those of fever, throat and muscle pains, and headaches. Then it gets worse, with nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and decreased functioning of the liver and kidneys. Then it gets even worse. The infected starts hemorrhaging or bleeding from the body’s mucous membranes — mouth (gums), nose, gastrointestinal tract, and vagina.
In June 2014, I posted on how the Ebola virus had made the jump from the jungles to West Africa’s urban centers. At that time, Dr. Bart Janssens of the charity group Medecins Sans Frontieres (Doctors Without Borders) had said the Ebola epidemic is now “out of control” in West Africa and warned that the epidemic would spread to more countries, unless there’s a stronger international response — which there wasn’t.
The latest: Sierra Leone’s chief Ebola doctor has himself contracted Ebola.
Reuters reports that 39-year-old Sheik Umar Khan, hailed as a “national hero” by Sierra Leone’s health ministry, had led the fight to control the Ebola outbreak that has killed 206 people in his country but now has caught the deadline disease that kills up to 90% of those infected and there is no cure or vaccine.
Even worse, yesterday Nigeria’s ministry of health said Ebola may have hit Lagos, Nigeria’s capital and the most populous city in Africa.
A Liberian man, who had worked and lived in Liberia where Ebola is prevalent, had collapsed at Lagos’s airport displaying symptoms of the disease. The Nigeria government has sent the man’s blood samples to the World Health Organization to be tested.
H/t ZeroHedge and FOTM’s swampygirl, josephbc69, and pnordman.
~Eowyn

Please follow and like us:
error0
 

U.S. running out of more and more prescription drugs

drug shortages box and pillKatherine Eban, “Drug Shortages: The Scary Reality of a World Without Meds,” Reader’s Digest Magazine, June 2014:
Jennifer LaCognata, 40, a booking agent for United Airlines from Safety Harbor, Florida, first suffered an attack of night blindness in early 2011. It took months to properly diagnose her. She was vitamin A deficient, due to a shortened bowel that made her body unable to absorb fat. The good news: The problem was totally fixable with injections of a basic medicine called Aquasol A, made by Hospira, an American generic drug company.
But bad news quickly followed. LaCognata learned that manufacturing challenges had forced Hospira to stop selling the drug, effectively plunging the entire world into a shortage. Without Aquasol A, LaCognata is going blind. United Airlines placed her on unpaid medical leave because she could no longer look at a computer screen. She is forced to wear an eye patch and can see only kaleidoscopic fragments out of one eye. “My kids call me Pirate now,” she says, “instead of Mom.”
LaCognata and her husband canvassed the world for Aquasol A. They contacted the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the State Department, and every major eye hospital in America. (They found two vials, but they were expired, so hospitals wouldn’t release them.) The couple wrote and called hospitals and organizations in Israel, China, Canada, and Brazil. LaCognata contacted charities, including the Red Cross and the Helen Keller Foundation, that serve foreign populations prone to vitamin A deficiency, without luck.
A Hospira spokesperson said that the company recognized the “critical need” for Aquasol A and had contracted with a separate manufacturing company to “accelerate the product’s return to market.” But years later, the company has yet to resume its production.
It is listed on Hospira’s website as “out of stock.”
“I can’t believe this could happen in America,” LaCognata says.
A Shocking Epidemic
It seems unfathomable in our high-tech medical system, but in 2007, 154 drugs were in shortage, a number that almost tripled to 456 in 2012, according to the U.S. Government Accountability Office.
Threatening medical-care options and patients’ lives, drug shortages have occurred in almost every pharmaceutical category. Antibiotics, cancer drugs, anesthesia, pain control, reproductive and gynecological drugs, cardiac medicine, psychiatric drugs, and intravenous-feeding solutions have all been in varying degrees of short supply or not available at all. Recently, nitroglycerin, an emergency room staple used to treat heart attack patients, has been in such severe scarcity that its sole U.S. manufacturer has restricted hospitals to 40 percent of their usual orders. A study published this March in the Mayo Clinic Proceedings attributed more than 15 documented deaths since 2010 to either lack of treatment or the switch to an inferior drug as a result of medication shortages.
Though the FDA has scrambled to alleviate the crisis and physicians have become deft at juggling or substituting treatments, there is no comprehensive solution to this drug-supply breakdown, which has persisted for a complex array of reasons.
The first is all about money. As generic drug prices have dropped, so have manufacturers’ profits. As a result, some manufacturers have failed to invest in infrastructure and quality control. To ensure safety, the FDA has taken regulatory actions that have halted supplies, with sterile injectable drugs, such as pain meds and chemotherapy, dominating the shortage list. (These are the most complex and costly generics to make.) The business model of just-in-time manufacturing—in which companies make drugs as patients need them but do not stockpile extra—leaves no margin for unexpected events.
Noting that there are no shortages of big profit-generators, like Viagra, many practitioners and patients suspect less-than-honorable motives by drugmakers. Some experts suggest that manufacturers may have financial incentive to temporarily stop production of a drug. Medicare reform imposed certain price controls on generic drugs, but, due to a loophole, these controls are lifted if a manufacturer stops making the drug for six months.
Limited manufacturing capacity is an important factor too. Over half the drugs on the FDA shortage list had only one or two manufacturers, according to a report by the IMS Institute for Healthcare Informatics. Some blame hospital buying groups, middlemen that purchase drugs and supplies for many of the nation’s hospitals, which have awarded contracts to some manufacturers and not others, thereby suppressing competition and innovation. The result is that for any given drug, there may be only one or two generic manufacturers left to produce it, which can lead to shortages.
Predatory middlemen are making the situation even worse. A congressional investigation led by Rep. Elijah Cummings, a Baltimore Democrat, has found that shady secondary wholesalers buy up drugs in shortage and resell them, often at exorbitant prices. This explains, in part, the haphazard ebb and flow of the shortages that makes them particularly hard to handle: One day the medicine is just gone, but there’s plenty the next.
But as experts debate the cause of the shortages, there is no disagreement over their devastating impact. They’ve turned pharmacists into professional beggars and have forced doctors to change treatment protocols on the fly—in some cases, turning routine care into a roll of the dice. They’ve stopped clinical trials and have led to the suspension of the death penalty in some states that use lethal injection.
Shortages are leading hospitals and patients to get drugs from less regulated and potentially less safe sources, such as drug compounders, specialty pharmacies that mix medications for individual patients. Some compounding pharmacies, which are not subject to regulation as stringent as that for drug manufacturers, have taken advantage of this and started churning out large volumes of drugs. But this can lead to safety issues. Such dangers became vividly clear in 2012, after contaminated steroids from the New England Compounding Center led to an outbreak of meningitis that killed 64 patients. A 2013 report by the Health and Human Services inspector general found that drug shortages have led 68 percent of U.S. hospitals to turn to compounders to make versions of medicine in short supply.
Patients today have to cope not only with being sick or choosing between treatment options but also with the possibility that the drug they need may be available solely from a risky source—or not at all.drug shortages by yearA Scary Reality for Cancer Patients
Those with life-threatening diseases have been hit hardest by shortages, in part because many of their medications have no substitute and their exacting treatment regimens cannot be delayed.
Justine Zirbes, 33, a TV producer in Minneapolis, was seven months pregnant with twins in October 2010 when she learned that her three-year-old, Axel, had leukemia. The distressing news sent her into early labor, and she was confined to bed.
As her son embarked on grueling chemotherapy for a disease that can often be cured if treated—but is almost certainly fatal if not—Zirbes learned that a national shortage of the chemotherapy drug cytarabine would affect his regimen. Doctors offered a drug called clofarabine, which was not standard treatment. Though still pregnant and on bed rest, Zirbes flatly refused. “How is this possible, in this country in 2011, that these lifesaving drugs are not widely available?” Zirbes recalls. “I was beside myself with disbelief.”
Zirbes was justified in her concern. According to a 2012 study in the New England Journal of Medicine, drug substitutions due to shortages led to higher relapse rates among children with an otherwise curable form of lymphoma.
Like Jennifer LaCognata, Zirbes embarked on a quest to find the right medicine. She contacted her senator Amy Klobuchar (D-MN), who took up the cause with proposed legislation. Zirbes produced two news segments on children affected by drug shortages. She worked every connection she had and looked as far away as Europe to find her son’s drug. Ultimately, the day before Axel was due for treatment, the hospital got enough cytarabine to treat him and another child.
Axel was reasonably lucky. Other patients, like Carey Fitzmaurice of Bethesda, Maryland, almost certainly suffered recurrence of their cancer because of drug shortages.
In 2006, Fitzmaurice, 37, was happily married with two young children and a job she loved as a policy analyst at the Environmental Protection Agency, when she learned that she had ovarian cancer and a BRCA1 genetic mutation that had likely caused it.
Over five years, she bravely underwent debilitating treatment, a recurrence of her ovarian cancer, an additional diagnosis of breast cancer, and a radical mastectomy. In the middle of 2011, things finally seemed to be breaking her way. Her breast cancer was in remission, and a chemotherapy drug called Doxil, made by a contractor for the Johnson & Johnson subsidiary Janssen, Inc., appeared to be vanquishing a recurrence of the ovarian cancer. But in August 2011, she learned there was not enough Doxil to complete her treatment.
Fitzmaurice assumed that she would be able to find some on her own. “I work for the federal government,” she says. “A lot of what I do is help people cut through red tape and find solutions. That’s how I tackled cancer to begin with: find out who the right doctor is, where to get surgery.”
But the shortage of Doxil thwarted her every effort. After four months without the medication, her ovarian cancer returned.
In a recent study from the University of Pennsylvania presented at the 2013 annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, 83 percent of oncologists and hematologists said they’ve faced cancer drug shortages, and of those, nearly all said their patients’ treatment had been affected by drug shortages.
At the Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center in Columbus, Ohio, Ryan Forrey, associate director for pharmacy and infusion services, says that in 2012, of the 60,000 doses of chemotherapy administered intravenously at his facility, almost 35 percent were affected by shortages. Treatment was interrupted or canceled, patients were switched to alternative drugs, or an alternative supply for the needed drug had to be found. His overwhelmed staff “was forced to beg, borrow, plead to get drugs for patients,” he says.
Now, whenever a patient begins chemotherapy, Forrey’s hospital sequesters the entire treatment regimen, which can be months of medication, to ensure that it is available. But Forrey is not optimistic that the drug shortages will ease.
“Every time I think it can’t get worse, it does get worse,” he says.
drug shortages five drug classesAre Drug Shortages a New Normal?
Shortages are not limited to drugs for cancer or uncommon diseases. Experts fear that scarcity of the heart attack drug nitroglycerin is endangering patients’ lives. Last spring, the most basic of antibiotics, doxycycline, used for everything from acne to Lyme disease, disappeared from pharmacies. Even intravenous saline solution, a hospital staple, has been in short supply, leading some hospitals to ration their use. In fact, almost every U.S. hospital has faced a lack of basic medicine, found an American Hospital Association survey. Many have even hired a full-time staff person specifically to navigate shortages.
Hospitals have developed complex formulas to help ration existing drug supplies—essentially, to determine which patients get medication and which don’t.
“No doctor wants to prioritize,” says Richard Schilsky, MD, chief medical officer of the American Society of Clinical Oncology. “But if you have five patients and only three vials, that’s a very real problem.”
A significant shortage creep is affecting mainstays of reproductive and sexual-health medicine, from anesthetics used in gynecologic surgery to antinausea drugs for pregnancy to antibiotics for sexually transmitted diseases, says Michele Curtis, MD, an ob-gyn in Houston. “I work in the most expensive health-care system in the world, and I am being asked to do it in third world conditions,” she says.
Thirty-seven of the 38 different components used in intravenous nutrition bags have been in fluctuating shortage since spring 2009, which is a serious threat to our country’s youngest and most fragile children. Insufficient zinc, for example, has led to raw blistering sores on the tiny hands of premature infants.
“We have been compromising what we feel is optimal care for close to three years now, and we don’t really see any end in sight,” says Jay M. Mirtallo, immediate past president of the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.
Rolling the Dice
Doctors, patients, and regulators have jury-rigged fixes with their own hazards, using drugs that may have worse side effects or less favorable outcomes or come from unsavory wholesalers or less regulated drugmakers.
The shortages have forced Susan Agrawal, in Chicago, to make difficult decisions as she struggles to keep her nine-year-old daughter, Karuna, alive. Karuna was born with cerebral palsy due to a ruptured umbilical cord. She has since developed an autoimmune disease that causes her organs to fail. She survives by getting her nutrients intravenously and needs bags of liquid nutrition with 14 components, which Agrawal gets from a specialized sterile infusion facility.
Agrawal has had to canvass local pharmacies and drug compounders to find the ingredients that the facility can’t get. In fact, she’s even purchased drug components from a compounding pharmacy that has had repeated run-ins with state regulators for unsanitary conditions. Then she must reconstitute the components, from powder to liquid, at her dining room table, with no guarantee of sterility, and add them to her daughter’s IV bags. “It’s like, ‘Cross your fingers,’ ” she says.
Although Karuna is very sick, the fact that her IV nutrition—which shouldn’t be this complicated—is so fraught may be compromising the quality of life she has left. Agrawal fears that given her daughter’s fragile health and immune system, the shortages “will surely cause her death.”
In a survey of 1,800 health-care practitioners, about 25 percent reported errors due to shortages. Among the 1,000 incidents: a patient who died from an infection that could have been treated had the antibiotic amikacin been available, accidental overdoses of alternative drugs, and prolonged hospitalizations due to side effects from alternative drugs.
A medicine substitution sickened Sharon Brown, who was being treated for stage 2 breast cancer at Ohio State University. She was suffering relatively few side effects from her chemotherapy drug, Taxol, but then in June 2011, her doctors were unable to procure her next dose and switched her to a similar drug, Taxotere.
Two days after her first dose, she suffered a devastating reaction, an uncommon but known side effect: She grew dizzy, broke into a cold sweat, and could not lift her arms over her head. She was so dehydrated that hospital staff could not even draw blood from her veins. For the next two weeks, she needed IV fluids every other day just to treat her dehydration. She was too sick to resume chemotherapy for another month.
Even the FDA has been boxed into a corner. After the cancer drug Doxil became unavailable in late 2011, the FDA made an emergency provision to allow an Indian generic-drug company, Sun Pharma Global, to temporarily export a similar generic drug, Lipodox, which is not approved in the United States. Although patients and doctors applauded the move, Sun Pharma has faced repeated past FDA sanctions for poor quality. (In 2009, U.S. marshals raided its U.S. manufacturing plant and shut down production.)
Patients say that drugmakers have forced them into unacceptable treatment. Sufferers of Fabry disease, a rare life-threatening enzyme disorder that dangerously slows blood supply, have only the drug Fabrazyme, made by the company Genzyme, to treat their disease. But in 2009, Genzyme was forced to shut down its manufacturing plant in Allston, Massachusetts, after a viral contamination was discovered.
As Genzyme entered into a consent decree with the FDA and struggled to open a new plant, it established a rationing program. Patients would be required to take a reduced dose instead of their whole dose. If they refused, they would be given no medicine and placed at the bottom of the waiting list. A spokesperson for Genzyme says the company imposed this condition after it consulted with a working group that included doctors and patient advocates. However, patients say that the FDA did not study the impact of the diminished dose, and—more shocking—the European Medicines Agency, Europe’s main drug regulator, found that a reduced dose accelerated disease in some patients. (Genzyme spokeswoman Lori Gorski says that during the shortage, the FDA did permit patients to take an alternative drug, Replagal, made by Shire.)
In February 2012, a Pittsburgh patent lawyer, Allen Black, PhD, who had worked as a drug developer, filed a lawsuit against the FDA on behalf of patients affected by drug shortages. Those included patients with Fabry disease as well as Jennifer LaCognata, who needs Aquasol A. The lawsuit alleged that by allowing drug companies to stop making a drug, the FDA effectively allows them to make life-or-death decisions for patients. As Black says, “There’s no appeals process. You get denied a drug? Tough.” The FDA’s response offered little comfort to patients expecting help. In a motion to dismiss the lawsuit, the FDA stated that while it “works with manufacturers to help prevent and mitigate these shortages, the FDA’s authority to address potential and actual drug shortages is limited.” Last November, the court dismissed the case.
For Real Solutions, We Need Big Reform
In July 2012, Congress passed the Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act, which included provisions originally spearheaded by Justine Zirbes’s senator Amy Klobuchar. The law requires that drugmakers give the FDA early notification of any manufacturing issues or business decisions that may lead to shortages. It requires the FDA to expedite inspections and reviews of manufacturing sites that could help resolve shortages.
There is some evidence that the FDA has been successful in holding back the tide. In 2013, the number of new drugs added to the shortage list was far less than the number added in 2012. But in the first quarter of 2014, active shortages remained close to the highest level ever. The situation, which was the subject of a congressional hearing in February, remains “very critical,” says Erin Fox, director of the University of Utah’s drug information service.
Critics say the FDA’s response is mere window dressing that has done little to change underlying problems. “It’s fine to say that the FDA should have six months’ advance notice,” says Dr. Schilsky. But he views the new legislation as “doing nothing to address the root causes” of the problem.
Meanwhile, doctors and patients have little information about when they can expect shortages to be resolved. Despite planning and promises from drugmakers, “many resolution dates are unknown or unmet,” says Ryan Roux, chief pharmacy officer at the Harris County Hospital District in Texas.
Companies aren’t penalized for drug shortages or incentivized to avoid them, experts say. The only real solution, say a number of health-care professionals, is to require drug manufacturers to stockpile medicine and to ensure that more than one drugmaker produces it. “There needs to be a way to obligate multiple manufacturers to make these lifesaving medications,” says Ohio State’s Forrey.
The FDA would have to require that manufacturers change their just-in-time manufacturing model and set aside reserves of lifesaving drugs, which the FDA has claimed is impossible. But one executive at a pharmacy benefit-management company, who asked to remain anonymous, says the FDA could easily mandate this: “Don’t give me this stuff: ‘We can’t tell the drug companies what to do,’” he says. “Yes, you can; you do it all the time.” The FDA, with all its leverage, “could probably solve 90 percent of the problem.”
Some vital industries, such as technology and defense, encourage what is called second sourcing, in which manufacturers may sublease at least one fifth of production to backup companies to avoid supply-chain disruptions in the event of natural or other disasters. Justine Zirbes, who faced the prospect that her son Axel could have died from leukemia without cytarabine, says that manufacturers who “stop making a lifesaving drug” should be subject to criminal prosecution.
In a separate proceeding, Jennifer LaCognata sued Hospira on the grounds that the company failed to plan for contingencies in its shortage of Aquasol A. Last June, Florida’s 11th Circuit Court of Appeals dismissed the suit. Her lawyer, Allen Black, then petitioned the U.S. Supreme Court, which declined to take the case. LaCognata, whose vision continues to deteriorate and who lost her house in a foreclosure proceeding, says she has to remain strong for her kids. “I have to have a very upbeat attitude,” she says, “or it would just consume [me].”
Just recently, her lawyer was staggered to learn from a friend who works for Doctors Without Borders that a version of the vitamin A drug that LaCognata needs is being manufactured in France, sold under the name Nepalm Vitamin A. But with her financial resources depleted, her doctor reluctant to prescribe it, and her need to get a compassionate-use exemption from the FDA (so the drug can get through customs), LaCognata just has to figure out how to obtain it.

Please follow and like us:
error0
 

Easter lilies are poisonous for cats!

easter-lily-stock-small2.jpg

Robert Preidt reports for CBS News, April 16, 2014:

Easter lilies are popular in homes at this time of year, but they can be deadly for cats, a veterinarian warns.

The same is true for Tiger, Asiatic, Day and Japanese Show lilies, said Dr. Melanie McLean, a veterinarian at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

The entire lily plant — leaf, pollen and flower — is poisonous for cats. Eating just a couple of leaves or licking a few pollen grains off their fur can quickly cause kidney failure.

A cat that’s eaten part of a lily will vomit soon afterwards, but this may gradually lessen after two to four hours. Within 12 to 24 hours, the cat may start to urinate frequently. Urination may then stop if kidney failure occurs. If untreated, a cat will die within four to seven days after eating a lily, McLean said.

Early treatment is critical and you should get your cat to a veterinarian immediately if you suspect that the cat has eaten a lily. The veterinarian may induce vomiting if the cat just ate the lily, and the cat will be given intravenous fluids to maintain kidney function and prevent dehydration, according to an FDA news release.

Other types of lilies, such as Calla and Peace lilies, don’t cause kidney failure in cats but can irritate their mouth and esophagus, McLean said. Lilies of the Valley can cause heart rhythm problems. In all cases, call your veterinarian.

If you have cats, it’s best not to have lilies in your home, McLean advised. If you do have lilies, make sure they’re in a location your cat can’t reach.

Lilies don’t pose a serious threat to dogs. They may suffer some gut problems if they eat a lily, but their lives won’t be in danger, according to McLean.

The Humane Society of the United States has more about plants that are poisonous to pets.

H/t FOTM’s josephbc69

~Eowyn

Please follow and like us:
error0
 

Natura dry pet food recalled due to Salmonella contamination

cat-dog-cute

From the U.S. Food and Drug Administration website:

Natura Pet Issues Voluntary Recall of Specialized Dry Pet Foods Due to Possible Health Risk

Contact:
Consumer:
(800) 224-6123

Media:
Jason Taylor
(513) 622-1111

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE – June 18, 2013 – Natura Pet Products is voluntarily recalling specific lots of dry pet food because it has the potential to be contaminated with Salmonella.

Salmonella can affect animals eating the products and there is risk to humans from handling contaminated pet products, especially if they have not thoroughly washed their hands after having contact with the products or any surfaces exposed to these products.

Healthy people infected with Salmonella should monitor themselves for some or all of the following symptoms: nausea, vomiting, diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, abdominal cramping and fever. Rarely, Salmonella can result in more serious ailments, including arterial infections, endocarditis, arthritis, muscle pain, eye irritation, and urinary tract symptoms. Consumers exhibiting these signs after having contact with this product should contact their healthcare providers.

Pets with Salmonella infections may be lethargic and have diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, fever, and vomiting. Some pets will have only decreased appetite, fever and abdominal pain. Infected but otherwise healthy pets can be carriers and infect other animals or humans. If your pet has consumed the recalled product and has these symptoms, please contact your veterinarian.

These products were packaged in a single production facility. During routine FDA testing, a single lot tested positive for the presence of Salmonella. There have been no reports of pet or human illness associated with this product. In an abundance of caution, Natura is voluntarily recalling all products with expiration dates prior to June 10, 2014.

The affected products are sold in bags through veterinary clinics, select pet specialty retailers, and online in the United States and Canada. No canned wet food is affected by this announcement.

The affected products are:

BRAND LOT CODE/UPC/SIZES; EXPIRATION
Innova Dry dog and cat food and biscuits/bars/treats All Lot Codes, All UPC’s, All package sizes All expiration dates prior to 6-10-2014
EVO dry dog, cat and ferret food and biscuits/bars/treats All Lot Codes, All UPC’s, All package sizes All expiration dates prior to 6-10-2014
California Natural dry dog and cat foods and biscuits/bars/treats All Lot Codes, All UPC’s, All package sizes All expiration dates prior to 6-10-2014
Healthwise dry dog and cat foods All Lot Codes, All UPC’s, All package sizes All expiration dates prior to 6-10-2014
Karma dry dog foods All Lot Codes, All UPC’s, All package sizes All expiration dates prior to 6-10-2014
Mother Nature biscuits/bars/treats All Lot Codes, All UPC’s, All package sizes All expiration dates prior to 6-10-2014

Consumers who have purchased the specific dry pet foods listed should discard them.

For further information or a product replacement or refund call Natura toll-free at 800-224-6123. (Monday – Friday, 8:00 AM to 5:30 PM CST).

~Eowyn

Please follow and like us:
error0
 

10 lipsticks with the most lead

Lead is a heavy metal — a soft malleable poor metal. At certain exposure levels, lead is a poisonous substance to animals and human beings. It damages the nervous system and causes brain and blood disorders. Like the element mercury, another heavy metal, lead is a neurotoxin that accumulates in soft tissues and bones. Lead poisoning has been documented from ancient Rome, ancient Greece, and ancient China. Some argue that lead poisoning of the upper class contributed to the downfall of the Roman Empire.

Maybelline's Pink Petal Color Sensational Lipstick has the most lead


A new study from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) found 400 brands of lipstick to contain lead.
While the FDA insists that the amounts detected do not pose safety risks to health, the Campaign for Safe Cosmetics says federal regulators have no scientific basis for this conclusion. For years, the consumer group has been pushing the government to set limits for lead levels in lipstick which the government resisted.

L'Oreal's Volcanic Lipstick


Sarah Halzack reports for the Washington Post, Feb. 14, 2012, on the 10 brands and shades of lipstick which contain the most lead. 5 of the top 10 are made by Maybelline and L’Oreal, both owned by L’Oreal USA.
1. Maybelline’s Color Sensation in Pink Petal. (Lead content: 7.19 ppm)
2. L’Oreal Colour Riche in Volcanic. (Lead content: 7.00 ppm)
3. NARS Semi-Matte in Red Lizard. (Lead content: 4.93 ppm)
4. Cover Girl Queen Collection Vibrant Hues Color in Ruby Remix (Lead content: 4.92 ppm)
5. NARS Semi-Matte in Funny Face. (Lead content: 4.89)
6. L’Oreal Colour Rich in Tickled Pink. (Lead content: 4.45)
7. L’Oreal Intensely Moisturizing Lipcolor in Heroic. (Lead content: 4.41)
8. Cover Girl Continuous Color in Warm Brick. (Lead content: 4.28)
9. Maybelline Color Sensational in Mauve Me. (Lead content: 4.23)
10. Stargazer lipstick in shade “c.” (Lead content: 4.12)
A full analysis of all 400 varieties of lead-containing lipsticks is available here.
~Eowyn

Please follow and like us:
error0
 

Fair and Balanced? Fox TV & Monsanto Kill a Story

[youtube=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=trWcqxrQgcc&feature=youtu.be]
~LTG
 

Please follow and like us:
error0
 

U.S. dogs die from chicken jerky treats from China


China has an abysmal track record in counterfeit products — including fake pet food (that killed American dogs and cats), fake drugs, fake milk and infant formula (that have killed Chinese babies), fake rice (mixed with plastic pellets, I kid you not), and the latest, fake electronics in U.S. weapons which endanger the lives of our troops.
After the 2007 recall of pet food made in China containing the lethal melamine, which led to the deaths from kidney failure of our dogs and cats, why are we still buying pet food manufactured in China? Is the memory of the American people so short and defective?

A reader of FotM, “Wish,” warns us about chicken jerky strips sold in Costco.

JoNel Aleccia reports for MSNBC, Nov. 21, 2011:

Chicken jerky treats may be to blame for dozens of new reports of mysterious illnesses and some deaths in dogs, prompting a renewed warning for pet owners by the Food and Drug Administration.

At least 70 dogs have been sickened so far this year after reportedly eating chicken jerky products imported from China, FDA officials said. That’s up from 54 reports of illness in 2010. Some of the dogs have died, according to the anecdotal reports from pet owners and veterinarians.

FDA officials say they have not been able to find a cause for the illnesses. Extensive chemical and microbiological testing has failed to turn up a specific contaminant and officials did not identify a specific brand of treats. They note that the reports of illness have not conclusively been tied to chicken jerky products, also sold as chicken tenders, chicken strips or chicken treats.

The new warning follows previous FDA cautions about chicken jerky treats in 2007 and 2008. But after a high of 156 reports of illness in 2007, the number of complaints dropped. Now, it’s rising again.

Dog owners and vets are reporting that animals may be stricken with a range of illnesses within days or hours of eating chicken jerky, including kidney failure and Fanconi syndrome, a condition characterized by low glucose.

Symptoms may include decreased appetite, decreased activity, vomiting, diarrhea, increased water consumption and increased urination. If dogs show any of these signs, stop feeding the animal the chicken jerky products, FDA officials said. If signs are severe or persist for more than 24 hours, seek veterinary help.

Most dogs have recovered, officials said.

Illnesses can be reported to the FDA’s Pet Food Complaint site.

+++
Allow me to ask pet-owners this question:
“Why are you feeding your dogs and cats manufactured treats? Why not give them real meat?”
I buy skinned and deboned chicken breasts, cut them into pieces,  and store them in my freezer. Each morning, I put a piece in a small glass bowl cook it for 3 minutes in the microwave, which I then feed as a treat to my two Persians. There’s no manufacturing, no additives, and no strange chemicals aside from the ones put into the feed for chickens by the corporate meat industry. My vet heartily approves, saying: “Yes! It’s real food!”
~Eowyn

Please follow and like us:
error0