Tag Archives: Eric Schneiderman

Bill de Blasio may be running for president

de blasio

Go for it Comrade Wilhelm. You ain’t got a chance of winning.

From NY Post (by Richard Johnson): Mayor de Blasio is putting out feelers to run for president, spreading whispers that Bernie Sanders, 75, and Elizabeth Warren, 68, are too old, sources say.

De Blasio, 56, will claim he’s the rightful standard bearer for the progressive wing of the Democratic party.

“He thinks he’s going to coast to re-election victory,” one Dem told me. “His people are sending out overtures asking where he should go next and whom he should meet on a national level.”

His jockeying could turn New York into a circular firing squad with Gov. Cuomo obviously poised to run; plus Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, who has been relentlessly raising money this summer; plus State AG Eric Schneiderman, who has friends in Hollywood, where Norman Lear has hosted fund-raisers for him.

De Blasio — who goes the extra mile to please his campaign donors and is richly rewarded for his service — was recently granted $2.57 million in city matching funds for his re-election. Whatever he doesn’t spend on the mayoral race can be rolled over to the coffers for his presidential campaign.

“The rumor is, he is setting up fund-raisers across the country after the election,” a veteran political consultant told me.

“De Blasio is putting all his chips on the 2020 race,” observed one longtime pol-watcher. “That’s why, instead of staying in the city to comfort the children of assassinated police officer Miosotis Familia, he jetted to Germany to join the anti-Trump rioters who were smashing store windows.”

“He thinks he’s the inheritor of the Warren and Sanders legacy,” said a Democratic power broker, “but no one told Warren and Sanders they were dead.”

DCG

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Thought Crime: 17 Democratic attorney generals go after climate-change deniers

green-nazis

The idea was first floated by academics when 20 professors & scientists signed a letter asking Obama to prosecute climate change (or what used to be called “global warming”) skeptics. They signed the letter despite the fact that there isn’t even agreement within the scientific community that (a) the Earth’s climate indeed is warming; and (b) it is human actions that cause that alleged warming.

Then the action swiftly shifted to government because government has the coercive force and power. (A classical definition of government, as any first-year undergrad political science major can tell you, is the institution in society with a monopoly on power.)

On March 9, 2016, at a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing, Obama’s attorney general Loretta Lynch admitted that the Department of Justice (DOJ) has discussed taking civil action, i.e., civil lawsuits, against climate-change deniers. (See “Thought crime comes to America: Obama admin is considering civil action against ‘climate change’ deniers“)

Now 17 state governments are doing what the federal government is considering.

On March 29, 2016, flanked by climate-change profiteer and hypocrite Al Gore — he who owns several luxury, energy-consum mansions and attended the Sept 2014 People’s Climate March in New York in a large carbon-burning Chevrolet Suburban SUV17 Democratic attorney generals (AGs) announced in a press conference that they will be targeting, with legal action and huge fines, any company that challenges or denies climate change.

Democrat AGs prosecute climate change deniers

Hans von Spakovsky reports for The Daily Signal that the coalition of 17 “AGs United for Clean Power” treated climate change as an absolute, unassailable fact, instead of what it is— a controversial and unproven scientific hypothesis.

Speaking at the press conference on March 29, New York AG Eric Schneiderman declared, “The bottom line is simple: Climate change is real.” He threatened that the AGs will pursue “to the fullest extent of the law” companies that commit fraud by “lying” about the dangers of climate change.

The coalition of 17 consists of:

  • The attorney generals of 15 states: California, Connecticut, Illinois, Iowa, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New Mexico, New York, Oregon, Rhode Island, Virginia, Vermont, and Washington;
  • AGs of the District of Columbia and the Virgin Islands.

16 of the 17 AGs are Democrats, while the AG for the Virgin Islands, Claude Walker, is an independent.

Schneiderman and Kamala Harris, representing New York and California respectively, have already launched investigations into ExxonMobil for allegedly funding research that questions climate change. Exxon emphatically denounced the accusations as false, pointing out that the investigation that “uncovered” this research was funded by advocacy foundations that publicly support climate change activism.

Standing next to Schneiderman throughout the press conference was the new inquisition’s Tomas de Torquemada — Clinton’s former VP Al Gore, who narrated a climate change propaganda film in 2006 entitled “An Inconvenient Truth” and deftly peddled the global-warming propaganda to amass a multi-million-dollar fortune. Gore praised what the coalition is doing as “exceptionally important,” never mind that what the AGs are doing is nothing less than prosecuting a thought crime.

When pressed on the effect that such investigations and prosecutions will have on free speech, Schneiderman said climate change dissenters are committing “fraud” and are not protected by the First Amendment.

At least for now, other state attorney generals still respect the First Amendment. Oklahoma AG Scott Pruitt and Alabama AG Luther Strange said they would not be joining this coalition:

“Reasonable minds can disagree about the science behind global warming, and disagree they do. This scientific and political debate is healthy and should be encouraged. It should not be silenced with threats of criminal prosecution by those who believe that their position is the only correct one and that all dissenting voices must therefore be intimidated and coerced into silence. It is inappropriate for State Attorneys General to use the power of their office to attempt to silence core political speech on one of the major policy debates of our time.”

H/t FOTM‘s maziel

See also:

~Eowyn

NATIONWIDE crime spike after Ferguson-Baltimore riots

It isn’t just Baltimore that’s experiencing a sharp increase in crime, esp. homicides, since the Freddie Gray riots (see “State of anarchy in post-riot Baltimore: Homicides spike; police presence scarce; residents fearful”). Crime rates have increased across America.

In an op/ed for the Wall St. Journal of May 29, 2015, Heather Macdonald, Thomas W. Smith fellow at the Manhattan Institute and the author of the 2002 book, Are Cops Racist?, writes that America’s two-decades-long crime decline may be over. Gun violence in particular is spiraling upward in cities across America, which, no doubt, will be used by Obama & company to push for gun control.

As examples:

  • Baltimore, gun violence is up more than 60% compared with this time last year, with 32 shootings over Memorial Day weekend. May has been the most violent month the city has seen in 15 years.
  • In Milwaukee, homicides were up 180% by May 17 over the same period the previous year. Through April, shootings in St. Louis were up 39%, robberies 43%, and homicides 25%. “Crime is the worst I’ve ever seen it,” said St. Louis Alderman Joe Vacarro at a May 7 City Hall hearing.
  • In Atlanta, murders were up 32% as of mid-May.
  • In Chicago, shootings had increased 24% and homicides 17%.
  • In Los Angeles, shootings and other violent felonies had spiked by 25%.
  • In New York, murder was up nearly 13%, and gun violence 7%.
  • In St. Louis, MO, after the shooting of Michael Brown in August, homicides surged 47% by early November and robberies in the county were up 82%.

Those citywide statistics mask even more startling (black) neighborhood-level increases. As examples:

  • Shooting incidents are up 500% in New York’s East Harlem precinct compared with last year.
  • Shooting victims are up 100% in a police division in South Central, Los Angeles.

By contrast, the first six months of 2014 continued a 20-year pattern of growing public safety. Violent crime in the first half of last year dropped 4.6% nationally and property crime was down 7.5%.

The most plausible explanation of the current surge in lawlessness is the intense hostility against American police departments over the past nine months.

Since last summer, the airwaves have been dominated by suggestions that the police are the biggest threat facing young black males today. A handful of highly publicized deaths of unarmed black men, often following a resisted arrest—including Eric Garner in Staten Island, N.Y., in July 2014, Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo., in August 2014 and Freddie Gray in Baltimore last month—have led to riots, violent protests and attacks on the police. Murders of officers jumped 89% in 2014, to 51 from 27.

POS & Holder

Obama and Attorney General Eric Holder, before he stepped down last month, embraced the conceit that law enforcement in black communities is infected by bias. The news media pump out a seemingly constant stream of stories about alleged police mistreatment of blacks, with the reports often buttressed by cellphone videos that rarely capture the behavior that caused an officer to use force.

Almost any police shooting of a black person, no matter how threatening the behavior that provoked the shooting, now provokes angry protests, like those that followed the death of Vonderrit Myers in St. Louis last October. The 18-year-old Myers, awaiting trial on gun and resisting-arrest charges, had fired three shots at an officer at close range. Arrests in black communities are even more fraught than usual, with hostile, jeering crowds pressing in on officers and spreading lies about the encounter.

Acquittals of police officers for the use of deadly force against black suspects are now automatically presented as a miscarriage of justice. Proposals aimed at producing more cop convictions abound, but New York state seems especially enthusiastic about the idea.

New York's Cerberus

New York state attorney general Eric Schneiderman wants to create a special state prosecutor dedicated solely to prosecuting cops who use lethal force. New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo would appoint an independent monitor whenever a grand jury fails to indict an officer for homicide and there are “doubts” about the fairness of the proceeding (read: in every instance of a non-indictment); the governor could then turn over the case to a special prosecutor for a second grand jury proceeding.

This incessant drumbeat against the police has resulted in what St. Louis police chief Sam Dotson last November called the “Ferguson effect.” Cops are disengaging from discretionary enforcement activity and the “criminal element is feeling empowered,” Dotson reported. “Ferguson effects” are happening across the country as officers scale back on proactive policing under the onslaught of anti-cop rhetoric. Arrests in Baltimore were down 56% in May compared with 2014.

A New York City officer explains, “Any cop who uses his gun now has to worry about being indicted and losing his job and family. Everything has the potential to be recorded. A lot of cops feel that the climate for the next couple of years is going to be nonstop protests.”

Police officers now second-guess themselves about the use of force. “Officers are trying to invent techniques on the spot for taking down resistant suspects that don’t look as bad as the techniques taught in the academy,” says Jim Dudley, who recently retired as deputy police chief in San Francisco. Officers complain that civilians don’t understand how hard it is to control someone resisting arrest.

A New York City cop says he was amazed to hear people scoffing that Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson, who killed Michael Brown, only looked a “little red” after Brown assaulted him and tried to grab his weapon: “Does an officer need to be unconscious before he can use force? If someone is willing to fight you, he’s also willing to take your gun and shoot you. You can’t lose a fight with a guy who has already put his hands on you because if you do, you will likely end up dead.”

Milwaukee Police Chief Edward A. Flynn, discussing hostility toward the police, said, “I’ve never seen anything like it. I’m guessing it will take five years to recover.”

Even if officer morale were to miraculously rebound, policies are being put into place that will make it harder to keep crime down in the future. Those policies reflect the belief that any criminal-justice action that has a disparate impact on blacks is racially motivated.

In New York, pedestrian stops—when the police question and sometimes frisk individuals engaged in suspicious behavior—have dropped nearly 95% from their 2011 high, thanks to litigation charging that the NYPD’s stop, question and frisk practices were racially biased. A judge agreed, and New York Mayor Bill de Blasio, upon taking office last year, did too, embracing the resulting judicial monitoring of the police department. It is no surprise that shootings are up in the city.

Politicians and activists in New York and other cities have now taken aim at “broken windows” policing. This police strategy has shown remarkable success over the past two decades by targeting low-level public-order offenses, reducing the air of lawlessness in rough neighborhoods and getting criminals off the streets before they commit bigger crimes. Opponents of broken-windows policing somehow fail to notice that law-abiding residents of poor communities are among the strongest advocates for enforcing laws against public drinking, trespassing, drug sales and drug use, among other public-order laws.

As attorney general, Eric Holder pressed the cause of ending “mass incarceration” on racial grounds; elected officials across the political spectrum have jumped on board. A 2014 California voter initiative has retroactively downgraded a range of property and drug felonies to misdemeanors, including forcible theft of guns, purses and laptops. More than 3,000 felons have already been released from California prisons, resulting in a surge of burglary, larceny and car theft in Los Angeles county.

Los Angeles Police Lt. Armando Munoz said, “There are no real consequences for committing property crimes anymore, and the criminals know this.” Milwaukee district attorney John Chisholm is diverting many property and drug criminals to rehabilitation programs to reduce the number of blacks in Wisconsin prisons; critics see the rise in Milwaukee crime as one result.

If these decriminalization and deincarceration policies backfire, the people most harmed will be their supposed beneficiaries: blacks, since they are disproportionately victimized by crime. The black death-by-homicide rate is six times higher than that of whites and Hispanics combined. The killers of those black homicide victims are overwhelmingly other black civilians, not the police. The police could end all use of lethal force tomorrow and it would have at most a negligible impact on the black death rate. In any case, the strongest predictor of whether a police officer uses force is whether a suspect resists arrest, not the suspect’s race.

Contrary to the claims of the “black lives matter” movement, no government policy in the past quarter century has done more for urban reclamation than proactive policing. Data-driven enforcement, in conjunction with stricter penalties for criminals and “broken windows” policing, has saved thousands of black lives, brought lawful commerce and jobs to once drug-infested neighborhoods and allowed millions to go about their daily lives without fear.

Any fatal police shooting of an innocent person is a horrifying tragedy that police training must work incessantly to prevent. But unless the demonization of law enforcement ends, the liberating gains in urban safety over the past 20 years will be lost.

See also:

~Éowyn