Tag Archives: electoral college

Nevada’s Democrat governor vetoes bill to abolish Electoral College

Our Founding Fathers created a federal republic, wherein the national government shares political power with state governments, instead of a centralized political system like China or the United Kingdom where political power is in the central government, and whatever powers are exercised by regional and local governments have been delegated to them — and thus, can also be taken away — by the national government.

To enable and uphold the American federation, the Founders created the U.S. Senate, in which each constituent state is represented by two senators, no matter the size of the state’s population. The Electoral College is another institution to prevent presidential elections from being determined by states with very large populations.

Cognizant that human passions can descend into mob-like behaviors, the Founders had another reason for the Electoral College: to prevent a tyranny of the (irrational) majority. The Founders’ fear of majority mob-rule was borne out less than 3 years after they created the Electoral College in 1787 when the French Revolution plunged the country into a decade of chaos and bloodbath.

Still in denial that Hillary Clinton had lost the 2016 presidential election and convinced that she had secured a majority of the popular vote, Democrats are mobilizing to abolish the Electoral College via the National Popular Vote interstate compact. To date, 14 states and the District of Columbia have passed legislation to give their 189 Electoral College votes to whichever presidential candidate wins the popular vote. The pact will only take effect if states holding the majority of the Electoral College’s 538 electoral votes join the agreement.

On May 21, 2019, by a 12-8 vote, the Nevada State Senate passed a bill to give the state’s 6 Electoral College votes to the winner of the presidential election’s national popular vote. Earlier, Nevada’s State Assembly had passed the bill 23-17. The addition of Nevada would boost the National Popular Vote interstate compact’s electoral votes to 195.

Happily, Nevada’s Democrat governor Steve Sisolak, who is threatened with a recall petition, surprised his critics by doing the right thing.

Gov. Steve Sisolak

As reported by The Hill, yesterday, Governor Sisolak vetoed Assembly Bill 186 that would have pledged Nevada’s Electoral College votes to the presidential candidate who wins the national popular vote.

Sisolak said in a statement:

After thoughtful deliberation, I have decided to veto Assembly Bill 186.

Once effective, the National Popular Vote Interstate Compact could diminish the role of smaller states like Nevada in national electoral contests and force Nevada’s electors to side with whoever wins the nationwide popular vote, rather than the candidate Nevadans choose.

I recognize that many of my fellow Nevadans may disagree on this point and I appreciate the legislature’s thoughtful consideration of this important issue.

~Eowyn

Better than Drudge Report. Check out Whatfinger News, the Internet’s conservative frontpage founded by ex-military!

Please follow and like us:
error0
 

Colorado governor signs law that gives state’s electoral votes to national popular vote winner

Over two years later, butt hurt from Hillary’s loss still alive and well.

From MSN (via CNN): Colorado could be part of voting history next general election day, joining 11 other states looking to ensure that their electoral college votes echo the will of the American majority to elect the next president.

Gov. Jared Polis (demorat) signed a law Friday that would allot the state’s electoral college votes to whichever candidate won the national popular vote. The Washington Post previously reported the law’s signing.

The trend comes as Americans have shown greater support in recent years for a more democratic presidential election process, without the translational risks of the electoral college. But the daunting requirement of changing the Constitution, where the electoral college is formally codified, has posed a challenge to both public and political support for the issue.

The state’s legislation would only take effect if enough other states sign on to secure the cumulative 270 electors needed to elect a president, and Colorado’s votes raise the current total to 181 electors. Most states have winner-take-all laws in place dictating that their electors go towards whichever candidate takes the state’s popular majority, while Maine and Nebraska opt to proportionally split their electors based on the vote.

The eleven other states that have signed on — California, Connecticut, Hawaii, Illinois, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, Rhode Island, Vermont and Washington state — as well as the District of Columbia and now Colorado, make up the National Popular Vote Interstate Compact. New Mexico, which has five electoral votes, sent a bill to the governor’s desk to elect the president by popular vote and may soon join the group as well.

And the electoral college had been contentious not long ago. In 2016, President Donald Trump won the presidential vote with 306 electoral votes to Hillary Clinton’s 232 votes. But Clinton won the popular vote, garnering 48.5% of the vote to Trump’s 46.4%.

DCG

Better than Drudge Report. Check out Whatfinger News, the Internet’s conservative frontpage founded by ex-military!

Please follow and like us:
error0