Tag Archives: Ed Murray

Homosexual Seattle mayor to give State of City address at mosque, slams Trump administration

ed-murray

Trump Derangement Syndrome on steroids: Where you have a homosexual mayor and advocate for the LGBT community giving a speech in a Muslim place of worship, in which their Islamic law considers homosexual acts a punishable crime.

From KIRO7: Mayor Ed Murray plans to give his State of the City address next week at a mosque in North Seattle. The address on Tuesday, his spokesman said, is meant to stand with the Seattle Muslim community “as we fight sanctioned discrimination by the Trump Administration.”

Murray made the announcement Monday with City Council President Bruce Harrell. This will be the first time Murray has held one a major speech to Council outside City Hall, though previous mayors have done so, his staff said.

Idris Mosque was opened in 1981 and is open to Muslims and non-Muslims.

“Both the City and Idris Mosque are committed to the American ideal of separation of church and state,” Murray’s spokesman, Benton Strong, said in an e-mail statement. “With this address Mayor Murray and Council are standing with Seattle’s Muslim community in their house of worship as we fight state sanctioned discrimination by the Trump Administration.”

“Throughout its history Seattle has stood with communities facing persecution from the government, including during the civil rights era at Black churches. “

The address will be given during a special Seattle City Council meeting which will be open to the public. It will be led by Harrell at 9:30 a.m. Doors open an hour earlier.

DCG

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Seattle to offer employees 12 weeks of paid parental leave

murray

Progressive Seattle Mayor Ed Murray

Guess who is vying for re-election?

Update: This was unanimously approved by the council, of course.

From Seattle Times: The Seattle City Council is set to vote Monday on whether to offer city employees up to 12 weeks of paid parental leave, rather than the four weeks they are offered now.

Mayor Ed Murray is asking for the change. It was less than two years ago that the council approved the existing benefit for new parents, making Seattle the first city in the Pacific Northwest and one of the first cities in the country to offer paid parental leave.

Employees would become eligible for 12 weeks after working for the city for six months. The benefit would apply not only to births but also to placements of children into homes through adoption, foster care and legal guardianship.

When Councilmember Kshama Sawant proposed 12 weeks of paid parental leave last year, her proposal was voted down.

Monday’s legislation would also give city employees a new benefit — up to four weeks of paid leave to care for family members with serious health conditions. The four weeks would be available every 12 months and employees would need to first use some sick leave and vacation leave.

Extending the parental-leave benefit to 12 weeks would cost the city an additional $2.6 million per year, according to the legislation’s fiscal note. Offering the new family-care benefit would cost an additional $436,000 per year, for a total of about $3 million.

Rather than refer Murray’s legislation to a committee for review and discussion, the council has chosen to take action on it immediately. Seattle has more than 11,000 employees.

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Seattle voters will soon get $100 in ‘democracy vouchers’ to donate to candidates

seattle-democracy-voucher

Yes, Seattle voters approved this: Taking money from private property owners to redistribute to the candidate(s) of their choice. How progressive

From the Seattle Times: Seattle voters will receive “democracy vouchers” for the first time next week. The Seattle Ethics and Elections Commission plans to mail the taxpayer-funded campaign-contribution vouchers on Tuesday to every registered voter in the city.

Each voter will get four $25 vouchers to distribute among candidates in 2017. The City Council’s two citywide seats and the City Attorney’s Office are up for election. The vouchers will be part of mayoral races starting in 2021 but won’t be allocated to candidates as Ed Murray seeks re-election next year. Mayoral races are the city’s most expensive and the wait will allow the voucher program more time to accumulate funds.

Seattle voters ensured the city would be the first in the country with democracy vouchers when they approved Initiative 122 in 2015. The “Honest Elections” measure authorized a 10-year, $30 million property-tax levy to pay for the program.

People not registered to vote can obtain vouchers as long as they live in Seattle, are at least 18 years old and are a U.S. citizen, U.S. national or green-card holder. The voucher-program application for nonvoters is available in 15 languages.

People participating in the program will sign the vouchers, assign them to candidates and mail them back to the elections commission. When given vouchers, candidates will relay them to the commission.

The commission, which is mailing out postage-paid return envelopes along with the vouchers, will verify them before releasing the money they represent to the candidates. Each voucher will have a unique identification number and bar code.

Only candidates who apply to and qualify for the program will be allowed to receive money from vouchers. To qualify, they’ll need to drum up a baseline number of campaign contributions, take part in multiple public debates, adhere to lower campaign contribution limits and agree to special campaign spending caps.

People with vouchers will be able to look up which candidates have qualified for the program by visiting the city’s website. Thus far, City Council candidate Jon Grant and incumbent City Attorney Pete Holmes have qualified.

The commission will publish a list of the candidates who have received money from vouchers along with names of the people who assigned the vouchers. In other words: If you assign a voucher, your support for a candidate will become public information.

The levy paying for the program will raise $3 million per year — not nearly enough to pay for every voter’s four vouchers. That sum would be about $50 million. But the campaign spending caps ($300,000 for citywide City Council candidates, for example) should work to limit the number of vouchers that will need to be paid out.

Wayne Barnett, executive director of the elections commission, said one aim of the program is to get more people involved in the electoral process. People who contribute to campaigns are later on more likely to volunteer and more likely to vote, Barnett said. “We know that only 1 to 2 percent of people in Seattle ever make a contribution to a candidate for city office,” he said. “So ideally this will get more people engaged.”

Another aim of the vouchers is to level the playing field for grass-roots candidates “who otherwise would in no way be able to raise $150,000,” Barnett said.

Opponents of I-122 said the voucher program would be complicated to supervise. They said the city would spend $28 of every $100 on administrative costs. The commission has the program under control, Barnett said. To run it, he hired René LeBeau, who previously helped King County Elections move to voting by mail.

I-122 opponents also warned about shenanigans and predicted the program would mostly benefit membership groups able to drive many vouchers to certain candidates.

Barnett has asked the state Public Disclosure Commission for advice on the program and Washington’s ban on bundling but has not yet heard back, he said. Bundling is when an individual or intermediary group collects many contributions on behalf of a candidate.

I-122 proponents said the bundling rules that apply to regular contributions would similarly apply to vouchers.

Proponent Aaron Ostrom, executive director of the progressive activist organization Fuse Washington, hailed the program’s launch. “This is an exciting chance to strengthen democracy and level the playing field in Seattle,“ Ostrom said. ”Candidates can compete based on their values and leadership abilities rather than their connections to wealthy friends and corporate donors.”

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Seattle to set aside money for undocumented students

The liberal City of Seattle has a major problem with homelessness. Mayor Ed Murray declared a State of Emergency on November 2, 2015.  To address the homelessness problem, the city set up safe RV lots for families and individuals living in vehicles. The problem with that? The City didn’t calculate the high costs associated with the program.

"The Jungle" homeless camp in Seattle/AP Photo

“The Jungle” homeless camp in Seattle/AP Photo

The money and resources spent has done nothing to solve the problem.  In mid-November, the Department of Housing and Urban Development released a report that indicated that there was an increase of 7.3 percent more homeless people in Washington state this year than in 2015.

Given that track record, does anyone believe that the city of Seattle can efficiently and effectively address the needs of illegal aliens? And why is the city allocating money to illegal aliens when U.S. citizens are living on the streets? Because it’s progressive.

From Seattle Times: The city of Seattle is allotting $250,000 to address the needs of undocumented immigrant illegal alien students enrolled in Seattle Public Schools and their families.

Progressive Seattle Mayor Ed Murray

Progressive Seattle Mayor Ed Murray

The move is part of an executive order Mayor Ed Murray signed Thursday, reaffirming Seattle’s status as a “sanctuary city.”

An “inclusive and equitable city cabinet,” made up of representatives from various city departments, will come up with a plan for how to spend the money, according to a news release from the mayor’s office that did not offer further details on what such needs might be.

The order also directs city employees not to ask residents about their immigration status, unless police officers have a reasonable suspicion that the person is committing or has committed a felony. It also directs departments to serve all residents regardless of immigration status.

The order had been expected as Murray had earlier promised that Seattle would remain a sanctuary city with policies to protect undocumented immigrants, despite Donald Trump’s election as president. Trump has vowed to crack down on cities that shield residents from federal immigration authorities, pledging to block federal taxpayer dollars from going to them, though it’s not clear Seattle would necessarily be among them.

Mayors of other cities, including New York and Chicago, have joined Murray in limiting the extent to which their city departments will help federal immigration authorities.

Washington’s population of undocumented immigrants illegal aliens grew by 40,000 between 2009 and 2014, making the state just one of six nationwide to see an increase, according to the executive order signed by Murray.

government solve all problems

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Reports of Seattle gun crime reaches record levels

But, but how can this be? Seattle’s new gun tax has left no shop in Seattle selling firearms. Wonder where the criminals could be getting their guns…

stoopid

From MyNorthwest.com: The second highest number of shots fired in Seattle were recorded between January and August of 2016. The only year to have a higher number was 2015. Seattle has also experienced more gun deaths in 2016 than the previous year.

City Living Seattle reports that a recent meeting of the East Precinct Police Advisory Council reviewed gunshot statistics for Seattle from January to August 2016. According to City Living:

The year 2016 saw 211 reports of shots fired from Jan. 1 to Aug. 1, the second-highest number of incidences for the same period of every year from 2012. Only 2015 was higher, with 226 police reports that included evidence or eyewitness reports of gunshots. The gap was even narrower when it came to the number of victims of gun violence. Between Jan. 1 and Aug. 1, the year 2016 saw 35 gun-related injuries, compared to 45 for the same period in 2015. But 2016 has seen more gun-related deaths, with seven fatalities this year versus six in 2015.

City Living reports that on Aug. 2 — the day after the January through August statistics end — Seattle had its eighth gun death. The majority of the shots fired were reported in the east precinct.

Anti-Second Amendment Mayor Ed Murray

Anti-Second Amendment Mayor Ed Murray

The data adds to other recent statistics reported by Seattle Times columnist Danny Westneat, who noted that rapes are up by 55 percent in Seattle over the past year. Police data shows that there have been 127 reported rapes in Seattle between January and Sept. 10, 2016. That’s more than the 82 reported during the same time in 2015, as well as more than the reported numbers over the past 10 years.

Domestic violence calls are also up by 11 percent in Seattle.

And going back to the issue of Seattle gun crime, local police seized more than 900 illegal guns in 2015.

Socialist Kshama Sawant has HER priorities straight...

Socialist Kshama Sawant has HER priorities straight…

But there is a debate between the data and other issues plaguing Seattle. Council member Kshama Sawant recently told the Jason and Burns Show that housing is a higher concern than police funding. That debate comes amid controversy over a proposed — and now canceled — north police precinct. Sawant argues that funding the construction of more housing trumps the need to fund such police projects.

A group called Block the Bunker also maintains this argument. It not only aims to halt the construction of the north precinct, but also has demanded that no more officers be hired in Seattle; the dismantling of the police officers’ union; and more.

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Meet George Scarola, Seattle’s first homeless czar

Let’s see how long it will take the “czar”, who is making $137,500 a year, to eliminate his job by solving the homeless problem

George Scarola

George Scarola

From MyNorthwest.com: It has long been speculated that Seattle will eventually get a homeless czar to handle the mounting issue in the region. Now, Seattle Mayor Ed Murray has hired for such a position — the city’s first director of homelessness, George Scarola.

“Because of the growing scope of work around homelessness, Seattle needs a proven manager to ensure we are achieving our desired outcomes,” Murray said. “I have known George for many years, working alongside him in Seattle and Olympia, and know him as a unifying leader that excels at creating successful results through community engagement.”

The position is slated as “cabinet-level.” Scarola will be paid $137,500 a year by the City of Seattle. He starts on Aug. 24.

In November 2015, Mayor Murray announced a state of emergency over the issue of homelessness in town. Since then, a cluster of city responses have addressed encampments in the area. The city even hired a homeless specialist to analyze the city’s approach — that expert basically said “less talk, more action.” But with George Scarola stepping in as the homeless czar, it is hoped that a more coordinated effort will take place. The idea is to have one person manage the efforts across multiple departments.

According to the mayor’s office:

“Scarola will be responsible for leading the city’s homelessness efforts across departments, providing oversight and evaluation of outcomes, strategic guidance, and leading community engagement.

To make it official, Murray signed an executive order Tuesday establishing the position. The order states that the director of homelessness will report to the mayor’s director of operations, and will essentially engage in a “systematic reform of the city’s response to homelessness.” The goal of the director is to improve the “overall quality, responsiveness, and success at serving people experiencing homelessness and the greater community.

Scarola has a history of working among educational and Democratic circles in Washington. Sacarola worked as the legislative director for the League of Education Voters. A 2012 article in Seattle Met referred to George Scarola as a lobbyist for the league. The mayor’s office notes that he was integral to motivating Seattle voters to approve educational bonds in the ’90s.

He was previously was top aide to Democratic State Representative Frank Chopp in 2000. Then he helped the Washington House Democratic Campaign in 2002 to obtain a majority in the house.

In the 1990s, Scarola was executive director of the Sand Point Community Housing Project that turned buildings on the Sand Point Naval Air Station into shelters for youth, adults and families.

DCG

Seattle weighs rules (regulations) for work schedules

Seattle officials began discussing this issue back in February – see my post about this here. The council members spearheading this are concerned with employees having what they call a “livable schedule.” Liberals love the term “livable”, especially when they can use it to force private businesses to meet their “progressive” demands.

government solve all problems

From the Seattle Times: Jerry Cole has a landscaping business. Four years ago, in order to make ends meet, he took on a second job as a courtesy clerk at the Rainier Beach Safeway. But the scheduling demands of the second job — including erratic hours and a schedule that isn’t posted until three days before the workweek starts — makes it difficult to do his first job.

“It’s hard to schedule my landscaping business with clients on a regular basis because I’m having to juggle my landscaping around when I have to be at Safeway week to week,” he said.

Stories from workers such as Cole are spurring some Seattle City Council members and Mayor Ed Murray to devise a scheduling law that could affect thousands of workers and many retailers in the city.

Worker and employer representatives are meeting — in separate groups — to pin down what they want, or at least what they can live with.

Business groups, including the Washington Restaurant Association, seem to accept that some kind of scheduling regulations are coming down the pike, and are quietly striving for rules that won’t be too onerous or inflexible.

But behind the scenes some heated words are already flying. “I now am questioning if you are trying to help people or just penalize businesses for being in business,” retired Starbucks President Howard Behar wrote in an email, addressed to Councilmember M. Lorena González and copied to other members, on the scheduling issue. “I am disgusted with this city government.”

Councilmember Lorena González

Councilmember Lorena González

In the two official working groups, ideas on the table from the workers’ representatives include:

  • Two weeks’ advance notice of schedules
  • A minimum of 11 hours’ rest between shifts, except when workers voluntarily choose to work with less rest
  • An hour of additional “predictability pay” when an employer changes a worker’s posted schedule
  • Up to four hours’ pay for workers who are assigned shifts that are either canceled, or reduced to less than four hours, with less than 24 hours’ notice
  • Offers of additional hours must go to existing part-time employees before new employees can be hired

Some business representatives have suggested more limited measures, including:

  • One week advance notice of schedules
  • 10 hours’ rest between shifts
  • An hour of additional “predictability pay” only for changes to the posted schedule initiated by employers

The business group is still discussing the remaining issues proposed by the worker representatives: pay for workers whose shifts are canceled or reduced, and giving part-time workers preference if more work hours are available.

Both groups are reportedly leaning toward having the law apply to large retailers and franchises, although specifics of what constitutes “large” and whether local restaurants should be included are still being hammered out.

An online survey of both workers and managers is under way to get a better idea of scheduling practices around the city and how those practices affect workers’ lives.

lisa herbold

González, who, along with Councilmember Lisa Herbold is spearheading the scheduling issue on the council, anticipates bringing legislation to the full council in August.

The goal, González said, is to “recognize the needs of business to be nimble in their scheduling practices, but also provide maximum protection to the most number of workers so we’re delivering on the promise of economic security to hourly workers.”

Read the rest of the story here, including Starbuck’s stance on this proposal (Starbuck’s is not participating in Seattle’s employer group talks yet they are answering questions for the city council).

DCG