Tag Archives: duping delight

Our noses get smaller when we lie

Due solely to the 1940 Disney movie that popularized Carlo Collodi’s children’s novel The Adventures of Pinocchio (1883), popular culture portrays our noses growing longer when we lie.

It turns out the opposite is true. Our noses actually shrink when we lie — the reverse Pinocchio effect.

Harry Pettit reports for the Daily Mail, Nov. 9, 2018, that scientists at the University of Granada in Granada, Spain, discovered that your nose actually shrinks when you lie because its temperature drops.

When we lie, the temperature of the tip of the nose drops up to 2.16°F (1.2°C), while the forehead heats up to 2.7°F (1.5°C). The greater the difference in temperature between both facial regions, the more likely the person is lying.

The study’s lead author, Dr. Emilio Gómez, Research Director of University of Granada’s Thermographic Laboratory, explains that the difference in temps is triggered by the brain power we exert when telling a lie, as well as by anxiety that we’ll be found out: “One has to think in order to lie, which raises the temperature of the forehead. At the same time we feel anxious, which lowers the temperature of the nose.”

Methodology:

  • 60 students were divided into two groups and asked to complete a number of tasks while they were scanned by thermal imaging technology.
  • Students in the experimental group made a phone call of about 3 to 4 minutes to a partner, parent or close friend in which the students told a significant lie, e.g., that they had been in a car accident.
  • Students in the control group also made a phone call in which they told a truth — that they were watching distressing videos of mutilated bodies and car accidents.
  • Dr. Gómez emphasized that participants in both groups were made to feel anxious — the control group because of the distressing videos; the experimental group because they had to lie.
  • The temperatures of the noses of 80% of the students in the experimental group decreased.

Although the reverse Pinocchio effect on the liar’s nose is imperceptible to the human eye, the Granada scientists designed a lie detector test that can identify liars by tracking the temperature of people’s noses. The scientists claim their lie detector test is the world’s most reliable, with 80% accuracy, which is 10% more accurate than the polygraph test.

Dr, Gómez said that ideally, police interviewers could one day combine current lie-detector methods with images from a thermal camera to catch lying criminals:

“The ideal case would be to combine both methods, strategic interviewing and thermography, moving our system to, for example, police stations, airports or refugee camps. That way, it would be possible to detect if a criminal is lying or to know the true intentions of people trying to cross the border between two countries.”

See “Deception: NGO coaches migrants how to pretend to be Christian refugees to gain political asylum”.

9 ways to spot a liar:

  1. The big pauseLying is quite a complex process for the body and brain to deal with. First your brain produces the truth which it then has to suppress before inventing the lie and the performance of that lie. This often leads to a longer pause than normal before answering, plus a verbal stalling technique like ‘Why do you ask that?’ rather than a direct and open response.
  2. The eye dart: When we look up to our left to think we’re often accessing recalled memory, but when our eyes roll up to our right we can be thinking more creatively. Also, the guilt of a lie often makes people use an eye contact cut-off gesture, such as looking down or away.
  3. The lost breath: Lying causes an instant stress response in most people, meaning the fight or flight mechanisms are activated. The mouth dries, the body sweats more, the pulse rate quickens and the rhythm of the breathing changes to shorter, shallower breaths that can often be both seen and heard.
  4. Overcompensating: A liar will often over-perform in a bid to be more convincing by speaking and gesticulating too much, too much eye contact (often without blinking), and over-emphatic gesticulation.
  5. The poker face: Many liars employ the poker face and almost shut down in terms of movement and eye contact.
  6. The face hide: When someone tells a lie they often hide their face by touching their nose or covering their mouth.
  7. Self-comfort touches: The stress and discomfort of lying often leads to liars comforting themselves by rocking, stroking their hair, or twiddling or playing with wedding rings.
  8. Heckling hands: The hardest body parts to act with are the hands or feet; these body parts often tell the truth. Liars often struggle to keep their hands and feet on-message while they lie. When a person’s words and hand gestures are at odds, it’s called incongruent gesticulation.
  9. Micro-expressions: These are very small gestures or facial expressions that flash across the face so quickly they are difficult to see. Experts will often use filmed footage that is then slowed down to pick up on the true body language response emerging in the middle of the performed lie. The best time to spot these in real life is to look for the facial expression that occurs after the liar has finished speaking. The mouth might skew or the eyes roll in an instant give-away. An example of a liar’s micro-expression is the duping delight — smiling with delight at getting away with a lie or a terrible crime.

See also:

~Eowyn

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Separated at Birth: Sandy Hook coroner & Pennsylvania school stabbing doctor

On April 9, 2014, a mass stabbing and slashing incident took place at Franklin Regional High School in Murrysville, Pennsylvania.
At around 7:13 a.m., 16-year-old Alex Hribal, a student at the school, wearing all-black clothing and armed with a pair of 8-inch kitchen knives, stabbed and slashed students in the first-floor science hallway, just minutes before the start of school. All told, 21 people were injured, including Hribal, who was taken into custody by police and charged as an adult with attempted homicide and aggravated assault.
In the video below, Christoph R. Kaufmann, M.D., Director of the Trauma Center at Forbes Regional Hospital in Monroeville, PA, spoke on the Franklin school stabbings. Dr. Kaufmann has 18 publications, the first of which — a co-authored article in the journal Current Surgery —  was published in 1987.
[youtube=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bUmVmvYY31g]
But wait!
Where have we seen and heard Dr. Chris Kaufmann before?
At Sandy Hook!
Below is a video of H. Wayne Carver, M.D., 61, the chief medical examiner of the State of Connecticut, at a press conference on December 15, 2012, a day after alleged lone gunman Adam Lanza allegedly shot to death, first his mom Nancy, then 20 kids and 6 adults at the Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut.
[youtube=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zE0OT5od9DA]
Note also the inappropriate smiles and grins of the state trooper with a moustache second to the left of Dr. Carver (or on the far right from our perspective), at the 1:46, 2:18, 3:07, 4:03, 5:15, 6:17, 6:32, 7:15, 7:46 (big grin), 8:41, 8:45, 9:16, 9:18, 9:35, and 11:52 marks in the video above.
What was so funny?
Psychologists call the trooper’s smiles “micro expressions” — flashes of facial expressions that are very telling. Especially curious is the trooper’s teeth-baring grin at the 8:41 mark. Pamela Meyer, author of the book, LieSpotting: Proven Techniques to Detect Deceptionwould call that grin “duping delight” — smiling with delight at getting away with a terrible crime. (See “How to Spot a Liar” for more.)
FOTM reader Barry Soetoro, Esq., fashioned the pic below, comparing Dr. Chris Kaufmann with Dr. Wayne Carver. Note especially their similar vertical frown lines between their eyebrows, and the similar dark patch of hair in the middle of their white moustaches.
4 dr chris kauffman - franklin school shooting
What’s the statistical probability that two men would look and sound so alike, are of approximately the same age, and are both medical doctors attending to the dead and injured of traumatic mass shooting/stabbing events?
I think any statistician would say the probability is infinitesimally small.
Curiously, on Feb. 25, 2011, about 10 months before the Sandy Hook school massacre, Dr. Carver wrote a letter to the Judiciary Committee of the State of Connecticut’s General Assembly, asking that Connecticut State law be changed to allow the State Medical Examiner’s Office to refuse to release autopsy reports on minors. He threatened to quit if they didn’t do it. The state legislature passed the legislation he requested, Bill 1054, and he withdrew his resignation.
Bill 1054 prevents the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner “from unilaterally disclosing autopsy reports on pediatric homicides to the general public.” Below is a composite of screenshots I took of Carver’s letter, beginning at the 3.46 mark from the video that follows the letter.

Click letter to enlarge

Carver letter1Carver letter2a
[youtube=https://youtu.be/fHGYIxdBcVY?t=3m46s]
5 months after the Sandy Hook massacre on May 23, 2013, The Courant reported that Dr. Carver, 61, announced his retirement. Carver, who always joked he was aptly named for the job, had worked at Connecticut’s coroner’s office since July 1, 1982, and as the state’s chief medical examiner since March 1989, with a salary of $303,433. Carver officially retired as of May 1 but was still working on a 120-day contract to help with the transition and complete his cases. Carver had already put in for retirement before the Dec. 14 shooting. He said he had been suffering from health issues in 2012 and only returned to work days before the massacre. Carver said the Newtown crime scene was by far the worst of his career.
For links to the posts FOTM’s has published on the Sandy Hook Massacre Hoax, go here. See especially:

~Eowyn

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