Tag Archives: Divorce

Hollywood’s Role in Destruction of the Family

If you have 10 minutes to spare…

this video charts a connection between Hollywood’s promotion of adultery and the skyrocketing divorce rate.

Let’s call Hollywood by a name that is more fitting. I welcome your suggestions for the renaming of the movie capitol.

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Stingy, fat man: Michael Moore’s ex-wife claims he’s stiffing her of movie profits

Fat man who rallies against capitalism refusing to pay his fair share of capitalist profits to his ex-wife. Shocker, not.

From Page Six: Documentarian Kathleen Glynn is cranking up the Fahrenheit on her fellow filmmaker-ex husband Michael Moore, hauling him to court for allegedly stiffing her on profits from their movie projects.

Glynn and the “Fahrenheit 9/11” director split in 2014 after 23 years of marriage, and an even longer business partnership.

“She was the driving force in the making of many of [his] films and other ventures in which Mr. Moore was the featured personality, dating back to their first big success, ‘Roger and Me’ (1989),” Glynn’s attorney Bonnie Rabin says in the new Manhattan Supreme Court suit.

Glynn also produced the Academy Award-winning “Bowling for Columbine” about the Columbine High School massacre and “Fahrenheit 9/11” — “the highest-grossing documentary film of all time.”

The suit claims Moore has walked away from a binding arbitration that was required to “flesh out the terms of an important provision in their property settlement.”

Glynn claims Moore’s trying to obtain all the benefits of their 2014 settlement in which she “signed over essentially all of her interest in the fruits of the parties’ joint efforts as film-makers … in exchange for a promise of future revenue-sharing by” Moore.

He was supposed to pay her 4 percent of total revenue from his creative works — but he gave her just $541 in 2014, the suit says. That means he would have pulled in just $13,525 during a seven-month period, according to court papers.

And Glynn’s not buying the amount of income Moore reported to the IRS — negative $350,862 in 2014 and negative $221,025 in 2016.

Moore and his lawyer did not immediately return messages seeking comment.

DCG

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Novels about women abandoning their families are the new ‘mommy porn’

leave-me-book
Via NY Post: If there is a truth universally held in fiction and by society at large, it’s that grown women aren’t supposed to run away from home. If they do, they risk losing everything — their families, if they have them. Their social standing. Sometimes even their lives.
But in the new novel “Leave Me,” by Gayle Forman, that’s exactly what the protagonist does, albeit not permanently. It’s more of a time-out.
Maribeth Klein is a busy working mom who’s so busy, so put-upon, she doesn’t even realize she’s had a heart attack — on the same night she’s supposed to host a potluck dinner, no less.
“At this very moment twelve 4-year-olds were rampaging around her apartment,” she thinks, after receiving the news about the heart attack. “Someone was going to have to clean up after them, to find the Goldfish crackers in the closet . . . Someone was going to have to make chocolate-chip pancakes for Saturday morning breakfast and to make sure the pantry was stocked with all the ingredients.”
In the days after her heart attack, she isn’t even allowed to recover in peace. Her mother, who is allegedly there to help, keeps hosting guests and leaves Maribeth to clean up coffee cups and dessert plates. Her husband seems incapable of putting together a FreshDirect order without her involvement.
drama
Fed up, she hightails it out of town and goes to Pittsburgh to look for her birth mother. While there, she also meets a man that seems far superior to her husband, holes up in a cozy new apartment where she’s able to cook for herself, make new friends and spend some much-needed time focusing on herself.
It’s an escapist fantasy where the fantasy doesn’t even involve sex, just a few kisses. Time, attention and the ability to focus are the real fantasy.
Call it the Runaway Mom genre.
Today, while only half of all marriages have a chance of lasting 20 years or more, that number goes up dramatically among college-educated women (who tend to buy and write fiction): 8 in 10 of these women will still be married after 20 years, according to a 2015 report by the Pew Research Institute.
The 35- to 55-year-old demographic came of age during the high divorce rate of the 1970s and ’80s, after all; they don’t have any illusions about the impact divorce can have on families. Divorce wouldn’t offer an escape from the minutiae — it just creates new logistical problems.
“Being able to drop everything is a luxury most of us don’t have,” says author Forman, who conceived of the book originally as a revenge fantasy after she experienced chest pains during a family vacation.
All she kept thinking about was how the family would manage if she had to have some sort of surgery. The year before, she had had a sinus procedure; the recuperation had not gone well. “When I was writing the book, it was the runup to the ‘50 Shades’ movie and I would tell people, ‘[My book] is the real mommy porn!” says Forman. “People would confess that they had the same fantasy. Every single woman had felt the same way.
50shades
It’s a different take on other female escapist books that we’ve seen in the past, among them the hugely successful book “I Don’t Know How She Does It” by Allison Pearson (2003), which features an overwhelmed working mother who alternately wants to escape to and from the high-powered job that she loves (plus, a handsome colleague in the New York office).
Then there’s “Eat Pray Love” (2006) about a woman trying to find herself post-divorce as she travels from Italy to Bali to India, but it’s no coincidence that protagonist Elizabeth Gilbert is child-free. Can you imagine a mother embarking on this trip? Forget the spiritual journey; the child-care arrangements alone would have stopped her at the airport. Maribeth Klein’s trip to Pittsburgh seems much more manageable. When mothers escape, the location is incidental; it’s the ability to exist outside of domestic minutiae that counts. (“I feel like I could rule an empire,” a frustrated mom friend once e-mailed me, “If I didn’t have to worry about things like new toddler snow boots.”)
big-little-lies
The Australian author Liane Moriarty also nails wifely desperation. In “Big Little Lies,” (soon-to-be an HBO series with Nicole Kidman and Reese Witherspoon), she explores what can lie behind the façade of a happy marriage, and in “The Husband’s Secret,” she examines just how much compromise and forgiveness might exist to keep a marriage on track.
If things are so gloomy, husbands so incompetent and bumbling, why don’t these women just leave for good? Some do pass a point of no return. For the most part, though, this isn’t “Madame Bovary” or “Anna Karenina,” where women who step outside the bounds of marriage and convention pay for it with their lives (although the 2015 novel/cautionary tale “Hausfrau” by Jill Alexander Essbaum did end with a bored adulterous mother jumping in front of a punctual Swiss train.) “Madame Bovary” and “Anna Karenina” were written by men, after all, who wanted to make sure their female characters paid dearly for ignoring the status quo.
In 2016, female readers tend to be more practical, less punitive. Fans of these books enjoy a dalliance or a brief escape — as long as it’s consequence-free. The fantasy of freedom involves being able to return home at will. It isn’t that they want to run away forever — just for long enough to catch their breaths.
“We have the fantasy,” says Forman, but “it doesn’t mean we don’t love our children or our husbands. It’s not just about running away physically, it’s about getting away mentally for a little while.
DCG

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My husband was no match for the fantasy hunk in my erotic novels… so I've ditched him

The single author..

The single author..


DailyMail: Her steamy, bestselling novels and strong male characters have seduced hundreds of thousands of female readers worldwide. But Jodi Ellen Malpas has revealed she has split from her own Mr. Right – because he no longer lives up to the fantasy she created. The 34-year-old, whose This Man trilogy has sold more than 500,000 copies, has left her husband of ten years after ‘falling in love’ with one of her characters.
Ms. Malpas, from Northampton, says: ‘All my fictional men are strong, successful, sophisticated and enigmatic. I guess it’s hard for any living, breathing man to live up to such a fantasy. ‘In This Man I created Jesse Ward, whose forceful personality was appealing to me. There is no denying I fell in love with him. After all, I created him and I made him the way he is for a reason. Every woman needs some fantasy lover to spice up the dull reality of her real life. I wanted to create my perfect love story.’
But the success of my books and the popularity of my male character led to the breakdown of my marriage. Sadly it was not solid enough to withstand the changes success has brought to my life.’
The mother of two, whom many believe is the new E. L. James, the housewife who wrote the Fifty Shades Of Grey trilogy, became a self-publishing sensation last year, swiftly rising to the top of the New York Times Best Seller List.
The This Man trilogy explores the love affair between young interior designer Ava O’Shea and playboy Jesse Ward. The second part of her new trilogy, One Night, has just been published by Orion.
‘I was 23 when Aaron and I got married, so we were both very young,’ she says. ‘I didn’t really know who I was. I got on with being a wife and mother.’
But over time I started to feel that something was missing – my normal everyday life had become a routine. I was bored. I guess that is what couples mean when they say they’ve grown apart. Aaron couldn’t understand why I wanted to write my fiction and I couldn’t understand why he didn’t understand.’
The couple have two children, Alfie, 14, and Patrick, ten. But although they divorced in August last year, Ms. Malpas says their relationship remains amicable. She is currently single and insists that she has no time to get involved in a relationship.
‘My children and my writing are enough for the moment,’ she adds. ‘In any case, I suspect some men might be a little intimidated by my independence and my success.’
And she insists she has no regrets. ‘It’s been crazy, but I’m loving the stronger more liberated me,’ she says.
grass
DCG

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On Sale At Your Local Checkout Counter: Obama’s Impending Divorce

The National Enquirer’s lead story this week.

http://www.nationalenquirer.com/celebrity/exclusive-obama-secret-divorce-papers

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Idaho Legislator Lays It on the Line about The Agenda


~LTG

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Billy Ray Cyrus Regrets Sending Miley to Disney.

Paging Doctor Obvious: it seems sending a Christian child to work for a secular entertainment network might be a bad idea.

In the latest issue of GQ magazine, country musician Billy Ray Cyrus admits that Hannah Montana has not exactly been a dream come true. “I’ll tell you right now — the damn show destroyed my family. I should have been a better parent. I should have said, ‘Enough is enough — it’s getting dangerous and somebody’s going to get hurt.’ I should have, but I didn’t. Honestly, I didn’t know the ball was out of bounds until it was way up in the stands somewhere.”
Cyrus is in the middle of a divorce from his long-time love Tish. While he did not specifically blame Disney for the marriage trouble, it must certainly have played a role. The two were married for 18 years and had three children together.
For Miley, the series run of Hannah Montana ended in January, and now the young singer is focusing on a music career in more mainstream pop. At the tender age of 18, she has already managed to include herself in a lesbian controversy, a gay marriage fiasco, a semi-nude photo spread, a pole dancing routine, a lap dance story, and rumors of marijuana use.
While most Americans became worried about Miley after the pole dance show, those of us who watch Disney saw warning signs long before. All the way back in 2007, Disney used Hannah Montana to show suggestive content not entirely suitable for young children, especially boys:

Cyrus told GQ he was worried about Miley. Given the similar actions of Disney alumni Vanessa Hudgens, Adrienne Bailon, and Alyson Michalka, it has to make parents wonder what kind of atmosphere Disney makes for these kids.
At this point two things should be very obvious:
1)      Miley needs our sympathy and prayers
2)      No religious family should allow their child to work for Disney
The time has come for conservative parents to realize that Disney is neither family-friendly nor concerned about childhood development.
-Candance

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