Tag Archives: Crucifixion

Good Friday: Remembering His Passion and Sacrificial Love

Good Friday, March 30, 2018.

Though strong as an ox, my erstwhile friend, the faux socialist Stephanie, is allergic to work. She would take a temporary job and, when it ends, apply for unemployment benefits. When the benefits run out, she’ll go find another temp job. And so on . . . .
Though raised a Christian, Stephanie is a goddess cultist, wiccan witch, and rabidly anti-Christian. Once, in a fit of self-pity, the perfectly healthy Stephanie blurted to me: “Don’t tell me how Jesus had suffered. I’ve suffered more than Jesus!”
Blasphemy
This post on our Lord’s passion and sacrificial love is for Stephanie, the “artist” Michael D’Antuono who painted the above blasphemous portrait of Obama in 2009, and all malignant narcissists who cheapen His memory by having the boundless arrogance and gall to compare themselves to Him.
jesus_crucifixion
The account below is difficult for us to read.
You will weep, if you have a heart.
Imagine how many hundred times difficult it was for our Lord, who endured all of it.

He sweated blood.

After He and his disciples had observed the Passover meal in an upper room in a home in southwest Jerusalem, they traveled to the Mount of Olives, northeast of the city.
There, in the garden of Gethsemane, for 12 hours (from 9 PM Thursday to 9 AM Friday), He prayed. He saw all the sins of humanity — past, present, and future. The cumulative effect of what He saw was so horrific that He sweated bloodhematidrosis, or hemorrhage into the sweat glands. His skin became fragile and tender from the hematidrosis, and He felt chilled in the night air.
Then the Roman soldiers came to arrest Him and took Him away — He who had committed no crime and no wrong, but instead had fed the hungry, healed the sick and blind, and even raised the dead.

He was scourged at least 39 times.

Scourging or flogging was a legal preliminary to every Roman execution. The usual instrument was a short whip (flagellum) with several single or braided leather thongs of variable lengths, in which small iron balls or sharp pieces of sheep bones were tied at intervals. Occasionally, staves also were used.
He was stripped of his clothing, His hands tied to an upright post. His back, buttocks, and legs were flogged either by two soldiers or by one who alternated positions. The scourging was intended to weaken Him to a state just short of collapse or death.
As the Roman soldiers repeatedly struck His back with full force, the iron balls caused deep contusions, and the leather thongs and sheep bones cut into His skin and subcutaneous tissues.Then, as the flogging continued, the lacerations tore into His underlying skeletal muscles and produced quivering ribbons of bleeding flesh. Pain and blood loss set the stage for circulatory shock.

His scalp was pierced with thorns.

The Roman soldiers, amused that this weakened man had been acclaimed a king just days ago when He entered Jerusalem on a donkey, mocked Him by placing a robe on his shoulders, a crown of thorns on His head, and a wooden staff as a scepter in His right hand. Next, they spat on Him and struck Him on the head with the wooden staff.
The crown of thorns was not a crown at all. It was probably a bush roughly applied, and tied on with rope.
The thorns probably came from the Lote Tree, a wild bush that still grows freely all over the Holy Land. This bush had thorns between one to two inches long. There are over 70 scalp wounds visible on the man whose image is seared forever into the Shroud of Turin.
The soldiers’ beating with the rods to His head covered with this crown would have caused severe bleeding. It is probable that the clump of thorns was removed before His tunic was put back onto His body, and then reapplied during the Crucifixion. The blood trickling down from the newly opened head wounds suggest that the thorns were reapplied before the Crucifixion.
Imagine the pain you’d feel if just one thorn, measuring 1 to 2 inches long, were stuck into your scalp . . . .

He carried his own cross, weighing 125 lb.

The severe scourging, with its intense pain and appreciable blood loss, most probably left Him in a pre-shock state. Moreover, hematidrosis had rendered his skin particularly tender. The physical and mental abuse, as well as the lack of food, water, and sleep, also contributed to His generally weakened state. Therefore, even before the actual crucifixion, His physical condition was at least serious and possibly critical.

It was customary for the condemned man to carry his own cross from the flogging post to the site of crucifixion outside the city walls.

Since the weight of the entire cross was probably well over 300 lb., “only” the crossbar or patibulum — weighing 75 to 125 lb. — was carried. The patibulum was placed across the nape of His neck and balanced along both shoulders, His outstretched arms tied to the crossbar. The processional to the site of crucifixion was led by a complete Roman military guard, headed by a centurion.

He was nailed to a cross to die.

The Romans did not invent crucifixions, but they perfected it as a form of torture and capital punishment designed to produce a slow death with maximum pain and suffering. It was one of the most disgraceful and cruelest methods of execution and usually was reserved only for slaves, foreigners, revolutionaries, and the vilest of criminals.

At the site of execution, by law, He was given a bitter drink of wine mixed with myrrh (gall) as a mild analgesic. He was then thrown to the ground on his back, with his arms outstretched along the patibulum.
His hands were nailed to the crossbar at the wrists. The nails were tapered iron spikes approximately 5 to 7 inches long with a square shaft 3/8 in. across.
After both arms were fixed to the crossbar, He and the patibulum, together, were lifted onto the stipes. Next, His feet were nailed to the front of the stipes.
Every breath He took was a struggle, seared with pain.
The weight of His body, pulling down on the outstretched arms and shoulders, fixed the intercostal muscles in an inhalation state and thereby hinder passive exhalation. Accordingly, exhalation was primarily diaphragmatic, and breathing was shallow. This form of respiration would not suffice and hypercarbia (abnormally-elevated carbon dioxide levels in the blood) soon resulted. The onset of muscle cramps or tetanic contractions, due to fatigue and hypercarbia, further hindered His breathing.
Every breath He took was a struggle, shot with agonizing pain.
To exhale, He had to lift His body by pushing up on His feet, flexing His elbows and adducting His shoulders. However, this maneuver placed the entire weight of the body on His tarsals, producing searing pain. Furthermore, flexion of His elbows caused rotation of His wrists about the iron nails, causing fiery pain along the damaged median nerves. Lifting of the body also painfully scraped His scourged back against the rough wooden stipes. Muscle cramps and paresthesias (pins and needles) of the outstretched and uplifted arms added to the discomfort. As a result, each respiratory effort became agonizing and tiring and led eventually to asphyxia (depletion of oxygen to the body).
After “only” 3 to 6 hours hung on the cross, He breathed his last.
Christ crucified

He suffered terribly, unto death, for each one of us.

Remember His Passion today with the Stations of the Cross. Go here.
For why it takes God to atone the sin of Adam, see “For God so loved the world that he gave his only Son”.
For why God became man in order to save humanity, see the Parable of the Farmer and the Geese in “You were purchased at a price“.
See also “Geologists confirm Jesus crucified on Friday, April 3, 33 AD”.
In memory of His love,
~Éowyn

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Remembering His Passion

Good Friday, March 25, 2016.

Though strong as an ox, my erstwhile friend, the faux socialist Stephanie, is allergic to work. She would take a temporary job and, when it ends, apply for unemployment benefits. When the benefits run out, she’ll go find another temp job. And so on…. Though raised a Christian, Stephanie is a goddess cultist, wiccan witch, and rabidly anti-Christian. In a fit of self-pity, the perfectly healthy Stephanie once blurted to me: “Don’t tell me how Jesus had suffered. I’ve suffered more than Jesus!”
Blasphemy
This post, “Remembering His Passion,” is for Stephanie, the “artist” Michael D’Antuono who painted the above blasphemous portrait of Obama in 2009, and all malignant narcissists who cheapen His memory by having the gall to compare themselves to Him.
jesus_crucifixion

He sweated blood.

After He and his disciples had observed the Passover meal in an upper room in a home in southwest Jerusalem, they traveled to the Mount of Olives, northeast of the city.
There, in the garden of Gethsemane, for 12 hours (from 9 PM Thursday to 9 AM Friday), He prayed. He saw all the sins of humanity — past, present, and future — and knew that the time of His death was near. Suffering great mental anguish, He sweated blood (hematidrosis). As a result of hemorrhage into the sweat glands, His skin became fragile and tender. In the cold night air, His hematidrosis would have produced chills.

He was scourged at least 39 times.

Scourging or flogging was a legal preliminary to every Roman execution. The usual instrument was a short whip (flagellum) with several single or braided leather thongs of variable lengths, in which small iron balls or sharp pieces of sheep bones were tied at intervals. Occasionally, staves also were used.
He was stripped of his clothing, His hands tied to an upright post. His back, buttocks, and legs were flogged either by two soldiers or by one who alternated positions. The scourging was intended to weaken Him to a state just short of collapse or death.
As the Roman soldiers repeatedly struck His back with full force, the iron balls caused deep contusions, and the leather thongs and sheep bones cut into His skin and subcutaneous tissues.Then, as the flogging continued, the lacerations tore into His underlying skeletal muscles and produced quivering ribbons of bleeding flesh. Pain and blood loss set the stage for circulatory shock.

His scalp was pierced with thorns.

The Roman soldiers, amused that this weakened man had been acclaimed a king, began to mock Him by placing a robe on his shoulders, a crown of thorns on His head, and a wooden staff as a scepter in His right hand. Next, they spat on Him and struck Him on the head with the wooden staff.
The crown of thorns was not a crown at all. It was probably a bush roughly applied, and tied on with rope.
The thorns probably came from the Lote Tree, a wild bush that still grows freely all over the Holy Land. This bush had thorns between one to two inches long. There are over 70 scalp wounds visible on the Shroud of Turin.
The soldiers’ beating with the rods to His head covered with this crown would have caused severe bleeding. It is probable that the clump of thorns was removed before His tunic was put back onto His body, and then reapplied during the Crucifixion. The blood trickling down from the newly opened head wounds suggest that the thorns were reapplied before the Crucifixion.
Imagine the pain you’d feel if just one thorn, measuring 1 to 2 inches long, were stuck into your scalp.

He carried his own cross, weighing 125 lb.

The severe scourging, with its intense pain and appreciable blood loss, most probably left Him in a pre-shock state. Moreover, hematidrosis had rendered his skin particularly tender. The physical and mental abuse, as well as the lack of food, water, and sleep, also contributed to His generally weakened state. Therefore, even before the actual crucifixion, His physical condition was at least serious and possibly critical.

It was customary for the condemned man to carry his own cross from the flogging post to the site of crucifixion outside the city walls.

Since the weight of the entire cross was probably well over 300 lb., “only” the crossbar or patibulum — weighing 75 to 125 lb. — was carried. The patibulum was placed across the nape of His neck and balanced along both shoulders, His outstretched arms tied to the crossbar. The processional to the site of crucifixion was led by a complete Roman military guard, headed by a centurion.

He was nailed to a cross to die.

The Romans did not invent crucifixions, but they perfected it as a form of torture and capital punishment designed to produce a slow death with maximum pain and suffering. It was one of the most disgraceful and cruelest methods of execution and usually was reserved only for slaves, foreigners, revolutionaries, and the vilest of criminals.

At the site of execution, by law, He was given a bitter drink of wine mixed with myrrh (gall) as a mild analgesic. He was then thrown to the ground on his back, with his arms outstretched along the patibulum.
His hands were nailed to the crossbar at the wrists. The nails were tapered iron spikes approximately 5 to 7 inches long with a square shaft 3/8 in. across.
After both arms were fixed to the crossbar, He and the patibulum, together, were lifted onto the stipes. Next, His feet were nailed to the front of the stipes.
Every breath He took was a struggle, seared with pain.
The weight of His body, pulling down on the outstretched arms and shoulders, fixed the intercostal muscles in an inhalation state and thereby hinder passive exhalation. Accordingly, exhalation was primarily diaphragmatic, and breathing was shallow. This form of respiration would not suffice and hypercarbia (abnormally-elevated carbon dioxide levels in the blood) soon resulted. The onset of muscle cramps or tetanic contractions, due to fatigue and hypercarbia, further hindered His breathing.
To exhale, He had to lift His body by pushing up on His feet, flexing His elbows and adducting His shoulders. However, this maneuver placed the entire weight of the body on His tarsals, producing searing pain. Furthermore, flexion of His elbows caused rotation of His wrists about the iron nails, causing fiery pain along the damaged median nerves. Lifting of the body also painfully scraped His scourged back against the rough wooden stipes. Muscle cramps and paresthesias (pins and needles) of the outstretched and uplifted arms added to the discomfort. As a result, each respiratory effort became agonizing and tiring and led eventually to asphyxia (depletion of oxygen to the body).
After “only” 3 to 6 hours hung on the cross, He breathed his last.
Christ crucified

He suffered terribly, unto death, for each one of us.

Remember His Passion today with the Stations of the Cross. Go here.

In memory of His love,
~Éowyn

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Jesus, remember me


“Jesus, Remember Me. . .”
Very early this beautiful Friday morning as I said my morning prayers, I saw in my mind’s eye the three crosses on Golgotha, our Dear Lord, Jesus, hanging on the cross in the middle, and the two criminals on each side of Him.  I could not get this out of my mind.
In Luke 23:39-43, the evangelist tells us:
Now one of the criminals hanging there reviled Jesus saying, “Are you not the Messiah?  Save yourself and us.”  The other, however rebuking him, said in reply, “Have you no fear of God, for you are subject to the same condemnation?  And indeed, we have been condemned justly, for the sentence we received corresponds to our crimes, but this man has done nothing criminal.”  Then he said, “Jesus, remember me when you come into your kingdom.”  He replied to him, “Amen, I say to you, today you will be with me in Paradise”.
This criminal has been referred to as “The Good Thief,” and is known as St. Dismas, whose Feast Day is celebrated on March 25th.
How inconceivable God’s Divine Mercy and love is to say this to the criminal who defended Him while He was suffering horribly on the cross!  We can always come to Jesus!  And, I have learned from this passage never to be afraid to defend and acknowledge Jesus, to defend what He said to us and to defend what He taught us, to defend our Faith!  We may be betrayed for His sake by family, by people we thought were friends, but there is nothing greater than to know He is with us and He will remember us.

“JESUS, REMEMBER ME. . .”
~Joan

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The Ballad of the Cross

Rarely have I found music and images that marry so perfectly.  ~LTG

James J. Tissot (French painter and illustrator, 1836-1902) was a well-known French impressionist painter, who in his later years travelled twice to the Holy Land in order to produced a series of 700 accurate watercolor drawings to illustrate the Old and New Testaments — especially the life of Christ.    https://www.joyfulheart.com/easter/tissot-passion.htm

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The Cross In Our Bodies

Many months ago, I got an e-mail from Fellowship co-founder Joan, about Laminin — a super-important protein that holds our bodies together, the molecular structure of which resembles a cross.

I bracketed that e-mail and promised myself I would look into it.

Well, I did, and it is true, confirmed by TruthOrFiction.com:

Laminin is defined by the Webster Medical Dictionary as a “glycoprotein that is a component of connective tissue basement membrane and that promotes cell adhesion.” In other words, looking at laminin as a kind of glue isn’t far from the truth….

In their book The Laminins authors Peter Elkblom and Rupert Timpl…They describe laminins that, together with other proteins, “hold cells and tissues together.” They also say, “Electron microscopy reveals a cross-like shape for all laminins investigated so far.”

This is what Wikipedia says about Laminin:

Laminins are major proteins in the basal lamina (formerly improperly called “basement membrane”), a protein network foundation for most cells and organs. The laminins are an important and biologically active part of the basal lamina, influencing cell differentiation, migration, adhesion as well as phenotype and survival.

Laminins are [also called] trimeric proteins [because they] contain an α-chain, a β-chain, and a γ-chain….The trimeric proteins intersect to form a cross-like structure that can bind to other cell membrane and extracellular matrix molecules….

The laminins are a family of glycoproteins that are an integral part of the structural scaffolding in almost every tissue of an organism…. Laminin is vital for the maintenance and survival of tissues. Defective laminins can cause muscles to form improperly, leading to a form of muscular dystrophy, lethal skin blistering disease (junctional epidermolysis bullosa) and defects of the kidney filter (nephrotic syndrome).

And here’s a diagram of Laminin:

How amazing is that!

Like the Cross on which our beloved Lord, Jesus the Christ, was crucified so that we may be saved, the laminin crosses in our flesh-and-blood bodies also give us life — until we leave this mortal coil to join Him in eternal life.

~Eowyn

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