Tag Archives: Chris Hughes

New welfare program Universal Basic Income comes to California

The U.S. government has a dizzying array of taxpayer-funded welfare programs, including:

  1. Negative Income Tax
  2. SNAP, formerly called Food Stamps
  3. Housing Assistance
  4. SSI (Supplemental Security Income)
  5. Pell Grants
  6. TANF (Temporary Assistance for Needy Families)
  7. Child Nutrition
  8. Head Start
  9. Job Training Programs
  10. WIC (healthy food for Women, Infants and Children)
  11. Child Care
  12. LIHEAP (Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program)
  13. Lifeline (Obama Phone)

As if those welfare programs aren’t enough, the Left have been floating the idea of a Universal Basic Income (UBI).

UBI is no longer hypothetical, but is being realized in two California cities — Oakland and Stockton.

Lukas Mikelionis reports for Fox News, July 9, 2019, that in the San Francisco Bay Area city of Oakland, Y Combinator, a startup incubator, is giving out $1,500 a month to randomly selected residents. It’s expected the money will soon be distributed to 100 recipients with a prospect of expanding the program to 1,000 people who will receive $1,000 monthly.

Next year, the city of Stockton in California’s Central Valley will begin a pilot Universal Basic Income program, in which a hundred residents will receive $500 a month without conditions, i.e., recipients can spend the money on anything they want without any strings attached. After 18 months, a decision will be made on expanding the UBI across all of Stockton.

On how welfare recipients misspend taxpayer funds, see:

The Stockton UBI program’s utopian goal is to eventually ensure that no one in the city of 300,000 lives in “poverty”. How “poverty” is defined is unclear.

Stockton’s economy is in shambles — from foreclosures (the city was declared America’s foreclosure capital); millions in debt from expensive development projects to lure in tourism; a median household income nearly $8,000 lower than the national median; and as many as 1-in-4 residents living below the poverty line. The city declared bankruptcy in 2012.

Stockton’s Universal Basic Income experiment has financial backing from wealthy Silicon Valley moguls, including Facebook co-founder Chris Hughes, 34, whose Economic Security Project contributed $1 million to the project. Hughes told CNN: “It is such a fundamental idea behind America that if you work hard, you can get ahead, and you certainly don’t live in poverty. But that isn’t true today, and it hasn’t been true in the country for decades. I believe that unless we make significant changes today, the income inequality in our country will continue to grow and call into question the very nature of our social contract.”

But Hughes has no intention to extend his own money for the UBI program. Instead, he wants the government to fund UBI welfare from higher taxes on the “wealthy” and high-tech companies. See “Facebook co-founder: Tax the rich at 50% & give $500/month to low income earners to fix income inequality“.

Note: Chris Hughes is notorious for ruining The New Republic magazine, which he purchased a majority share of in 2012 as what the New York Times calls “a vanity project”. After mass departure of the magazine’s staff, he sold it 4 years later. Hughes is an open homosexual, married to Sean Eldridge, political director of Freedom to Marry. The couple bought a $2 million residence in New York’s 19th congressional district with the reported purpose of permitting Eldridge to run for the congressional seat there. Eldridge lost his 2014 bid for a congressional seat by 30 points. Following that and the mass resignation from The New Republic, The Daily Beast dubbed the two “America’s Worst Gay Power Couple”.

Other business moguls have endorsed the UBI idea, though mostly in rhetoric, including billionaire Richard Branson, entrepreneur Andrew Yang, Tesla’s Elon Musk, and Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg. Musk wrote in a tweet last month: “Universal income will be necessary over time if AI takes over most human jobs.” Zuckerberg said in his May 2017 Harvard commencement speech: “We should explore ideas like universal basic income to make sure that everyone has a cushion to try new ideas.”

Others who have spoken out in favor of universal basic income, whether by name or in effect, are Senator Bernie Sanders (S-V) and Robert Reich, Bill Clinton’s Labor Secretary (source).

Both Sanders and Reich are millionaire socialists (an oxymoron!):

  • Bernie Sanders owns three homes, including a $600,000 lakeside summer home he purchased just 5 days after the end of the 2016 Democratic National Convention in which he betrayed his “useful idiot” supporters by enthusiastically endorsing Hillary Clinton. In June 2018, Newsweek reports that in 2017, for the second year in a row, Sanders made more than $1 million.
  • Robert Reich has an estimated net worth of $4 million.

It is the perverse nature of the Left to refuse to learn from precedents.

Finland experimented with UBI by giving €560 (US $657) per month to 2,000 unemployed working-age people. The program, however, came to an abrupt end in April after the Finnish government decided against continuing to fund the program. (The Guardian)

See also:

~Eowyn

Facebook co-founder: Tax the rich at 50% & give $500/month to low income earners to fix income inequality

chris hughes

I wonder how much of his $450 million net worth he’s given away to address income inequality?

From CNBC: Facebook co-founder Chris Hughes thinks the government should give cash handouts to people with the lowest incomes in order to fight income inequality. And he thinks the money should come from higher taxes on wealthy individuals and even big tech companies, like Facebook.

Hughes, 34, was one of Facebook’s co-founders, along with Mark Zuckerberg and three of their Harvard classmates, in 2004. He was Facebook’s spokesperson for the company’s first three years, before leaving to finish his Harvard degree and then to work on Barack Obama’s 2008 presidential campaign as a media strategist.

He says he’s made “half a billion dollars for three years of work” based on the value of his initial stock in Facebook, and his “lucky break” is exactly what’s wrong with America today.

That is indicative of a fundamental unfairness in our economy. Income inequality in our country has not been this bad since the Great Depression. And even though we’re reading the headlines that unemployment is at 3.9 percent and the stock market is at record highs, what’s actually happening is that the median incomes in our country haven’t budged in nearly 40 years. At the same time stories like mine create an illusion of economic opportunity,” he told Techcrunch contributors Adriana Stan and Tom Goodwin on their “Interesting People in Interesting Times” podcast.

Hughes, author of “Fair Shot: Rethinking Inequality and How We Earn,” is not necessarily a believer in the idea of universal basic income (UBI) — championed by entrepreneur Andrew Yang and also supported by billionaires such as Richard Branson and even Facebook’s Zuckerberg — which would see a standard cash payment handed out to all citizens no matter their employment status. UBI “is infeasible in America today,” Hughes explained on the podcast, because making payments to everyone in the U.S. is an “unaffordable” proposition.

However, Hughes believes a reconfigured U.S. tax code could effectively transfer money from wealthy people like himself to those in need, from the unemployed to American workers struggling to make ends meet. He says on the podcast that the “most urgent thing we can do” is roll back tax code changes that lowered rates on corporations and the 1 percent and instead give a $500 monthly tax credit to every working American who currently earns less than $50,000 per year to create an “income floor” — a minimum amount of money that people earn.

The plan would cost roughly $290 billion a year in total, Hughes said in April. He proposed that the government taxpayers pay for the handouts by imposing a 50 percent tax rate on both income and capital gains for any Americans who earn more than $250,000 per year. (Individuals who earn more than $200,000 per year currently have their income taxed at 35 percent, based on the latest tax overhaul.)

By giving low-income workers $500 a month, Hughes contends, you would guarantee they would not earn less than $6,000 per year. “That’s not enough money to live on. That’s not enough money to put up your feet and, like, watch video games — the fear of a lot of folks out there. But it is a massive amount of money in the lives of many working people in our country,” he said on the podcast.

Read the whole story here.

DCG

The Lucifer Alliance: Secret group of powerful leftwing moneybags

Did you know that in 2012, the State of California “contributed” more than any other state to President Lucifer’s reelection campaign? And most of California’s campaign contributions came from the Los Angeles-Long Beach metro area (think Hollywood), second only to Washington, D.C. and New York City.

Playing an important role in California’s campaign contributions to the POS is a secret, invitation-only group of leftist moneybags who call themselves the Democracy Alliance, which funneled some $100 million into the 2012 election.

Given the group’s leftwing ideological proclivities — pro-Obama, amnesty for illegals, gun control, climate change, abortion, gay “rights” — it should more appropriately be called the Lucifer Alliance. And that’s how I’ll refer to the group in this essay.

Although the Democracy Lucifer Alliance discloses neither its members nor its beneficiaries, information has leaked out over time. Three of its members are very well known. They are:

1. The old goat, George Soros: billionaire international currency speculator and backer of President Lucifer. On April 9, 2007, Soros held a fund-raiser for Obama where this picture was taken:

Soros fundraiser

2. Chris Hughes: The 29-year-old co-founder of Facebook.

Chris_Hughes

3. Peter Lewis, chairman of Progressive Insurance (which is why you should not buy your auto insurance from Progressive!):

In early May of this year, the group held a 5-day semi-annual conference in a luxury ocean-front resort in Laguna Beach, Calif., to which the Los Angeles Times was granted exclusive access.

Matea Gold reports for the L.A. Times, May 4, 2013, that the Democracy  Lucifer Alliance is an influential network of some of America’s wealthiest “liberal” political donors. Comprised of roughly 100 members who pay annual dues of $30,000, the Alliance itself does not make donations. Instead it requires its members to contribute at least $200,000 a year to organizations in the Alliance’s portfolio.

The group intentionally has a low profile and  “carries significant sway on the left,” with deep-pocketed members like Soros, Hughes, and Lewis. Rob McKay, a San Francisco-based philanthropist is the Lucifer Alliance’s chairman.

Since its founding by strategist Rob Stein in 2005, the Democracy Lucifer Alliance has contributed some $500 million toward “progressive” leftwing candidates and causes, including the “liberal” think tank Center for American Progress; Media Matters for America, which aims to debunk conservative claims; and Catalist, which maintains a voter database used to help campaigns target potential supporters.

At the Laguna Beach conference, the group selected the pro-Obama Organizing for Action (OFA) and immigration reform groups such as the National Immigration Forum as some of its top 2013 funding priorities.

OFA is a nonprofit group formed by the POS’s top political aides that has been pressing for Congress to pass a universal background check for gun buyers, among other issues. The Democracy Lucifer Alliance has brought in about $5 million for OFA in the first quarter of 2013, with a goal to raise a total of $50 million by year’s end.

The Laguna Beach conference drew more than 150 donors and activists for sessions on topics such as the economy, gun control and climate change. Among the activists pitching to the donors was OFA executive director Jon Carson. Speakers at the conference included California Gov. Jerry Brown, California Lt. Gov. and former San Francisco mayor Gavin Newsom, and Robert Reich, Secretary of Labor in the Clinton Administration.

By the end of the conference, members had pledged to distribute $50 million this year to an array of groups on the left, a sum leaders said was particularly impressive in light of last year’s costly election campaign.

Stay tuned for Part II of “The Lucifer Alliance,” on the names and identities of 38 less-famous but equally pernicious members of the Alliance!

H/t California Political News & Views and  Matthew Continetti of the Free Beacon.

~Eowyn