Tag Archives: China

Little girls in China model lingerie in Victoria’s Secret-style show

serious

The child models are wearing highly-decorated bra-like tops and underwear. They also are wearing the “Angel wings” that Victoria’s Secret model wear. I’m not posting the pictures because they are child porn.

From Yahoo: Fashion shows are constantly being criticized for their use of either underweight or overweight models, or models who in some way don’t represent the general population.

Now new photos have emerged of a show that many feel has just totally crossed the line: Girls who appear to be as young as 5 have walked the runway in a Victoria’s Secret–style fashion show in China.

The shocking images show that the children were wearing nothing but lingerie, costume wings, and headpieces — all in front of a very snap-happy crowd.

The show was held at a shopping mall in Chengdu City, in southwest China’s Sichuan province.

It comes after Kim Kardashian sparked controversy with her new children’s line after showing off a bikini and lace slip dress on Snapchat just last month.

“I’m not dressing my 4-yr-old daughter in a leopard n lace slip dress Kim Kardashian Kids Line,” one outraged parent wrote.

h/t Drudge

DCG

Advertisements

Despite new social experiment with different body types, Barbie sales tumble

barbie dolls

From NY Post: Barbie still isn’t pulling her weight at Mattel. Shares of the toymaking giant dropped nearly 10 percent in early Friday trades after it posted disappointing quarterly sales and profits, partly blaming weak demand for its iconic Barbie dolls.

Barbie sales tumbled 5 percent during the quarter, marking Barbie’s third consecutive decline despite last year’s launch of three new Barbie body types — petite, tall and curvy — which briefly goosed sales. Barbie is also increasingly available in a range of skin colors in a bid to make Barbie more attractive to kids worldwide.

Mattel blamed shriveling licensing fees for the drop, while also reporting weak demand for its American Girl, Monster High, Mega Bloks and Thomas & Friends toys in North America. Fisher-Price sales dropped 3 percent. That weighed down Mattel’s results, as well as disappointing demand for toys based on the new “Cars 3” movie.

Shares of Mattel fell about 9.2 percent to $19.35 in early Friday trades.

The Cars movie franchise has been profitable for the toymaker since the series launched in 2006. But U.S. demand for “Cars 3” toys has been soft, Mattel said in a post-earnings call.

“Barbie sales excluding the lapping of a license revenue event in the previous year would have been up about 5 percent, but were not enough to offset more aggressive declines in Monster High and Ever After High,” Jefferies analyst Stephanie Wissink wrote in a client note.

Net sales rose about 2 percent to $974.5 million, but missed analysts’ estimate of $979.7 million, according to Thomson Reuters I/B/E/S.Sales in the company’s Asia Pacific region, of which China is a major part, rose 16 percent to $122.2 million in the latest quarter.

Mattel is renewing its focus on emerging markets such as China where it has tied up with Alibaba Group and Chinese parenting website Baby Tree to set up educational development and learning centers for children.

Excluding certain items, the company lost 14 cents per share, missing analysts’ average estimate of a loss of 9 cents per share.

DCG

Know the rules: A white professor can’t be Chinese because of “privilege”

daniel bell

Professor Daniel Bell: Ain’t no Rachel Dolezal…

A man can be a woman and a white woman can be black. Yet a white man can’t be Chinese. I can’t keep up with all the science-defying liberal rules anymore.

From Yahoo: A white scholar’s recent op-ed suggests he might need some lessons on his own privilege. 

Daniel Bell, a white dean at China’s Shandong University, recently penned a piece in the Wall Street Journal entitled “Why Anyone Can Be Chinese.” In it, he laments how he’s not considered Chinese despite his self-proclaimed dedication to the culture.

China, he argues, should look at identity as cultural rather than racial, concluding the piece with his ultimate hope:

“President Xi Jinping describes his broad agenda for the country as the ‘China dream,’” Bell writes. “My own China dream is more modest: to be viewed as a Chinese not just in my own mind but in the minds of my fellow Chinese.”

Bell claims to have respect for the Chinese. But his piece shows that he’s not looking at identity through the lens of the Chinese. John Kuo Wei Tchen, associate professor and director of Asian/Pacific/American Institute, NYU notes: Bell begins his piece, making comparisons between himself and a Chinese-American who “doesn’t speak Chinese or identify in any way with Chinese culture,” and “forcefully rejects” the label “Chinese.”

But the connections Bell makes are apples to oranges. Bell, a white man from Canada, ignores the real, human experiences that Chinese people live through, Tchen noted.

Bell isn’t someone whose family has been brought up in China through generations, communicating through insider references. His ancestors haven’t lived through events like the Opium Wars or the Cultural Revolution that have shaped the population’s outlook. Bell is a white man whose roots and values come from elsewhere. 

There’s another issue at hand with Bell’s comparison. Ideas of belonging and identity are tied to political environment, Tchen says. These concepts are forged out of history and traditions, constructed over time by cultural and political forces. A western view of these ideas will be different from, say, a Chinese one. Bell doesn’t seem to acknowledge that, though.

“Notions of citizenship and belonging come out of particular political cultures. Just because that’s what he believes in, he wants to apply that to China which doesn’t really make any sense,” Tchen said. “It can’t just be willy-nilly applied to any other place.”

Bell continues his argument, listing several traits of his that he believes somehow underscore his “Chineseness.” Though he brings up possible barriers to acceptance like citizenship, commitment to culture, and lack of language skills, he insists those aren’t problems for him. He points out how he’s often “the only person wearing Chinese-style clothing” at conferences. And earlier in the piece he mentions his marriage to a Chinese woman as if those details help assert Chineseness.

In another line, he even puts down native Chinese people and pretentiously writes, “millions of poorly educated Chinese citizens speak hardly any Mandarin, and yet nobody questions their Chineseness.”

However, identity isn’t so simple as checking traits off a list, Tchen said. Bell’s possession of such qualities does not make him more “eligible” to be Chinese.

To be Chinese is not a mere checklist, just like being black or from any other culture isn’t about hitting a set number of achievements.

“If he were to become an expert on Toni Morrison, if he were to then master African-American cuisine, if he had married an African-American woman, would he feel he can claim being African-American or black?” Tchen questioned.

At one point, Bell attempts to point out the flaws in seeing Chineseness as racial and describes the country’s tumultuous relationship with foreigners.

“When China is powerful and secure, foreigners are welcome and considered employable, including at the highest levels of government,” he wrote in the op-ed. “When China is weak, foreigners are often viewed with suspicion and even hatred.”

Tchen told HuffPost that he agrees that ideally, we “need to reject the very notion of ‘race’ and hence racial belonging.” These ideas don’t translate across historical and cultural differences, he says. But again, being part of a culture is dependent on historical context. Identity goes further than today’s politics and culture.

At the end of the day, Bell’s piece begs the question posed by Tchen. “Are there not deeper shared values that are more important to explore than a European Canadian wanting to be accepted as ‘Chinese?’”

DCG

Obama admin told father of student imprisoned in North Korea to “keep a low profile”

obama and warmbier

In typical form, Obama was more concerned about his own image.

From Fox News: The father of Otto Warmbier said his son, who was imprisoned in North Korea for 17 months before being returned home in a coma this week, “fought to stay alive” during his ordeal.  

Fred Warmbier also dismissed whatever efforts were made on behalf of his 22-year-old son Otto by the Obama administration, which asked the family to keep a low profile when news of Otto’s arrest became public.

“The results speak for themselves,” he said in a news conference, adding that President Trump, by contrast, reached out to him personally.

“Last evening, we received a very nice phone call from Pres. Trump, who told us that Sec. of State Tillerson worked hard to bring Otto home. We are extremely grateful for their efforts and concern,” he said.

At the same news conference a spokeswoman for the University of Cincinnati Medical Center reported that Otto suffered a “severe neurological injury” and was in “satisfactory” condition.

Warmbier said his son “fought to stay alive” while in captivity since January 2016. “Otto is a fighter,” he said. “I’m so proud of Otto, my son, who has been in a pariah regime for the last 18 months – brutalized and terrorized.”

“His spirit is with us and I can share his spirit with my spirit,” said Warmbier, who was wearing the very same light-colored blazer his son wore during his trial in North Korea in March 2016.

His disgust for the Pyongyang regime was crystal clear. “We went for 15 months without a word from or about Otto. It was only a week ago that we were informed that the North Korean government now claims he was in a coma for almost all of that time. Even if you believe their explanation of botulism and a sleeping pill causing the coma — and we don’t — there is no excuse for any civilized nation to have kept his condition secret and denied him top notch medical care for so long. North Korea is a pariah regime, they’re brutal (feed loses quality) and they’re terroristic.”

Warmbier, a University of Virginia student, was detained on Jan. 2, 2016, at Pyongyang International Airport, while visiting the country as a tourist with Young Pioneer Tours. He was charged with stealing the sign from a staff-only floor in the Yanggakdo International Hotel in Pyongyang and committing “crimes against the state.” He was given a one-hour trial in March 2016, when the government presented fingerprints, CCTV footage and pictures of a political banner to make its case against the American student. “I beg that you see how I am only human,” Warmbier said at his trial. “And how I have made the biggest mistake of my life.”

Despite his pleas, the college student was sentenced to 15 years of hard labor. In a post-trial video released to the world, Warmbier, under obvious duress, praised his captors for his treatment and for handling of the case “fair and square.”

Before Thursday’s news conference, a U.S. official had told Fox News that Warmbier was in a coma for “over a year.” The official added that the North Koreans told the U.S. that Warmbier contracted botulism and slipped into a coma after taking a sleeping pill. Neither the family nor doctors treating Warmbier have commented on that claim.

Fred Warmbier also criticized the companies that profit off young people’s naïve willingness to visit North Korea. “The North Koreans lure Americans to travel to North Korea via tour groups run out of China, who advertise slick ads on (feed loses quality) the internet proclaiming no American ever gets detained off of our tours and this is a safe place to go.”

In Wyoming, Ohio, a Cincinnati suburb, friends and neighbors of Warmbier said they were elated the young man was home but expressed grave concern over his condition.

“We’re very concerned for his health and future,” said neighbor Tom Purdy. “We hope he can return to normal. We’ve been praying for him every night.”

At Wyoming High School, where Warmbier attended, students described him as an “outstanding person” who was known in the community for his academic achievements and athleticism.

Foreigners who have been detained or imprisoned in the Hermit Kingdom often have a shared experience: confusion, forced confessions, communication blackouts and isolation.

Warmbier’s release leaves three U.S. citizens currently known to be held in North Korea: accounting professor Kim Sang Duk, businessman Kim Dong Chul and Kim Hak-Song, who worked at Pyongyang University.

When asked what advice he might have for their families, Warmbier said he had none. “I wouldn’t know what to say to them,” he said. “This is, I’ve been told, not precedented.”

DCG

Hollywood’s summer movie season is off to a rough start

Hollyweird

Imagine my despair…

From NY Post: Tinseltown’s hopes for a $5 billion summer are already fizzling, with a couple of flicks crashing out of the gate.

Warner Bros.’ “King Arthur” and Fox’s “Alien: Covenant” both disappointed this month, and movie analysts are warning this summer’s box office won’t be as hot as last year, when Disney’s “Finding Dory” was the biggest hit.

When it comes to striking cinema gold, no one needs it more than Viacom’s Paramount Pictures and Sony’s Columbia Pictures. Paramount, which just tapped a new chief executive and got a fresh injection of cash from its China financing deal, needs to find its mojo, and quickly. The studio lost $136 million in 2016 and has paid out steep restructuring and severance charges.

Paramount is behind the upcoming “Baywatch” movie and is releasing a new “Transformers” feature. “If ‘Transformers: The Last Knight’ flops, Paramount is in big, big trouble,” said Jeff Bock at Exhibitor Relations, which tallies ticket sales. “They need a billion-dollar hit.”

Sony, meanwhile, is set to roll out “Spider-Man: Homecoming,” in partnership with Disney’s Marvel. “They’re planning multiple spinoffs” for Spider-Man, according to Bock. “But you need the flagship firing on all cylinders.” Sony also is releasing “The Emoji Movie” in July, for which expectations are already set low.

The inclusion of the Iron Man character will help juice interest in “Spider-Man,” but “it’s the third reboot in 15 years,” Bock notes.

Last year’s summer box office was $4.4 billion. Anything under that number is going to have Tinseltown in a tizzy, according to the analyst.

A survey conducted by online movie ticketing service Fandango suggests that Warner’s “Wonder Woman,” out on June 2, is the most anticipated movie of the summer, followed by “Spider-Man.”

A strong first quarter at the box office and promising. However the summer sorts out, executives on the lots can always plead their newbie status.

Viacom’s Bob Bakish, who took over as acting CEO in October last year, hired new Paramount boss Jim Gianopulos in March. Twentieth Century Fox has a new chief in Stacey Snider. Sony Pictures Entertainment this month named as its new CEO Tony Vinciquerra, who starts in June. Meanwhile, Warner Bros. parent Time Warner is in the midst of being acquired by AT&T. Only Disney and Universal have left their top executives in place this year.

“I don’t think anyone will judge [Paramount’s] Jim Gianopulos based on this summer,” observes Cowen & Co. entertainment analyst Doug Creutz. “Warner really needs to do well. They had one issue with ‘King Arthur,’ and they have ‘Dunkirk’ coming out, it’s a prestige picture.”

Warner is launching the most original movies versus sequels, and will likely be the biggest spender on marketing this summer.

DCG

Matt Damon’s ‘The Great Wall’ to Lose $75 Million

matt-damon

Too bad, so sad…

From Hollywood Reporter: The collapse of The Great Wall at the domestic box office (it has made $34.8 million in North America) has iced any notion of a significant future for U.S.-China co-productions. The movie likely will end up with losses of more than $75 million, sources say, and Universal Pictures will be on the hook for at least $10 million.

The studio funded about 25 percent of the film’s $150 million production budget, the rest coming in equal parts from Legendary Entertainment, China Film Group and Le Vision Pictures. But Universal also covered Wall’s global marketing expenses, conservatively estimated at $80 million-plus. The film earned $171 million in China (a disappointment) and is expected to top out at about $320 million globally. That’s way less than investors had anticipated for the biggest-ever U.S.-China co-production. “The fusion of the No. 1 and No. 2 movie markets in the world will eventually happen, but it is a misfire, domestically speaking,” says box-office analyst Jeff Bock. Adds one Hollywood executive who has dealt extensively with China, “There’s no question but that it’s a failure.”

The good news for Universal is that its share of this failure will be relatively modest. The studio gets to collect a roughly 10 percent distribution fee from all theatrical revenue (between 40 percent and 50 percent of the total box office), and box-office rentals likely will recoup much, if not all, of its marketing outlay before other investors dip into whatever money is left to cut into production costs. The four partners will split any further theatrical income equally.

If the movie generates hoped-for ancillary revenue (including $20 million from domestic home entertainment and as much as $40 million from international home entertainment, with $25 million to $30 million from TV — admittedly, a best-case scenario), that will further stanch the red ink.

Read the rest of the story here.

DCG

China fights masculinity ‘crisis’ with new textbook for boys

super-junior

A bad influence: South Korean boy band Super Junior

Pajama Boy, SJWs, and feminazis do not approve.

From Fox News: China is apparently concerned that its boys are becoming too effeminate. The country’s solution: a masculinity-promoting school textbook called Little Men, aimed for use in grades 4 and 5.

The illustrated book talks about fathers and sons, and it encourages boys to stress their masculine side, with money management and other ostensibly guy-geared topics thrown in.

NBC News reports the concern is widespread and that citizens blame the “gender crisis” on everything from too much homework (and too little physical activity), to being spoiled rotten by parents allowed just one child. “Girls are becoming more like boys while the boys are becoming more like girls, introvert[ed] and shy,” one parent complains.

An English-language newspaper in China blamed the perceived problem on “effeminate” actors and pop stars in Japanese and Korean culture.

The new six-chapter textbook was printed in December by Shanghai Educational Publishing House and has already been given a test drive in some schools. The idea is that boys will be taught from the book during class, while girls won’t take the course, reports the South China Morning Post.

Anthropologist Tiantian Zheng tells NBC the concern about masculinity is seen as a priority among government officials, and she suggests that all-male middle schools could result.

DCG