Tag Archives: body mass index

Feminism promotes obesity: Extremely overweight actress Chrissy Metz is “inspiring”

chrissy metz

This is “inspiring”

Chrissy Metz is an actress who is 5’4” and weighs 400 pounds according to bodymeasurement.org. The CDC has a body mass index (BMI) calculator that measures Chrissy’s BMI as 30.0 and above – she is obese. Her normal weight range should be 108 to 145 pounds.

People who are overweight or obese are at higher risk for chronic conditions such as high blood pressure, diabetes, and high cholesterol. According to Stanford Health Care, because of Chrissy’s obesity she is also subject to bone and joint disease, heart disease, sleep apnea, cancer, and metabolic syndrome (a clustering of medical conditions).

Yet in today’s society, “body shaming” is taboo. Thanks to feminism, we are told to be inclusive, body accepting, body positive, loving, and blah, blah, blah.

The “fat acceptance movement” and “fat feminism” do nothing to promote healthy women. To accept an obese body is to imply that one has no control over their behaviors. Our bodies are changeable and an obese person should be able to accept that truth. By resigning themselves to the impression that their bodies can’t be changed, they just perpetuate victimhood.

How about telling the truth for once? Chrissy is obese and there is nothing inspiring or empowering about that.

From Yahoo: The fashion industry is becoming more inclusive — at a snail’s pace, perhaps, but with palpable momentum behind the march of progress. It’s largely thanks not to the industry itself but to everyday people, whose beauty and bodies have long been overlooked and who have now stepped forward, demanding to be seen.

Chastity Garner and CeCe Olisa are two of those people, and they’ve stepped into view first as plus-size lifestyle influencers and bloggers and presently as founders of the popular annual event known as theCURVYcon. Now in its third year, the body-positive, curve-embracing event will take place in New York City on Sept. 8 and 9, bringing designers, fitness experiences, influencers, and speakers to town — including none other than Chrissy Metz, who stars on This Is Us, to deliver the keynote address (you heard it hear first, folks). Another first? TheCURVYcon will be live-streamed on Yahoo Style, bringing insightful conversation to millions of people who can’t make the IRL event.

Olisa and Garner are dedicated to promoting visibility of different body types within the plus-size world. That, in addition to Metz’s Emmy nomination, made the beloved actress the ideal woman to represent theCURVYcon this year. “A lot of times, in our space, the women who are celebrated are hourglass women — they’re a size 10 to 14, like the perfect version of a ‘plus-size’ woman,” Garner tells Yahoo Style. “I feel like [for] having size diversity and getting out of that hourglass shape, Chrissy Metz is a great representative for that. We love Ashley Graham, but she’s definitely the poster child of what a plus-size model ‘should’ look like. Someone like Chrissy Metz, her body type is a little bit different — we’re so happy to celebrate that.”

Olisa adds: “Representation is so important, and just seeing people who look like you anywhere is great. So when the hottest show on television has a very visibly plus-size girl who is cute, and falling in love, and doing her thing on the show, it’s inspiring.

While current conversations might make it easy to believe that such a space for plus-size women has always existed in the fashion community (during New York Fashion Week, no less), the reality is that it’s a recent phenomenon, spurred on by Garner and Olisa’s insistence that the industry make room.

“If inclusion isn’t happening by invitation, then we’re just going to move in ourselves,” Olisa tells Yahoo Style.

Read the rest of the story here.

DCG

Advertisements

Morbidly obese woman dies after 3 airlines refused to fly her

Americans are getting fatter and fatter. At the rate we’re going, in 18 years, by the year 2030, more than 4 of every 10, or 42% of Americans may become obese and 11% could be severely obese.

Obesity is more than being over weight. These terms are defined by the body mass index (BMI), a measurement that is closely related to both percentage body fat and total body fat:

  • “Normal weight” means a BMI of 18.5–24.9
  • “Over weight” means a BMI of 25.0–29.9
  • “Obesity” means a BMI of 30.0–34.9
  • “Severe obesity” means a BMI of 35.0–39.9
  • “Morbid obesity” means a BMI of 40 or over

To calculate your BMI, click here!

One woman found out she was, at 425 lbs., too fat to fly. She was turned down by three commercial airlines for a flight from Hungary back to the United States. Stuck in Hungary, her already poor health worsened, resulting in her death and likely a lawsuit against the airlines.

image001.png
image001.png

Jill Reilly reports for the Daily Mail, Nov. 26, 2012, that on September 17, 56-year-old Vilma Soltesz (see photos, left and below) traveled with her husband Janos from New York to their holiday home in their native Hungary. It was a trip the couple made every year.

Vilma was already severely obese and in poor health from diabetes and kidney disease. She had lost a leg and used a wheelchair.

The couple had planned to return to New York after a month at the vacation home they owned in the Hungarian countryside, so Vilma could continue medical treatment for her diseases. Meanwhile, Vilma had put on even more weight while in Hungary, which her husband claims was water weight caused by her kidney disease and diabetes.

Janos recounted that on October 15, Vilma was kicked off her first flight. She was already seated on the KLM plane when they were asked to leave. The airline tried to fit her into the back of the plane, but they didn’t have a seat-belt extension to secure her. KLM also told the couple the seat back could not take Vilma’s weight.

After leaving the airplane, the couple waited in the airport for several hours and then were told to drive five hours to Prague for a Delta plane that could accommodate her as a disabled person.

But in Prague, Delta staff told the couple the airline’s plastic wheelchair could not hold her weight and the staff also couldn’t put her on the sky-lift elevator.

The couple were forced to return to their Hungarian holiday home until their New York travel agent managed to get them on an October 22 Lufthansa flight to New York via Frankfurt, which would be able to accommodate her size.

Although Lufthansa had set aside three seats for Vilma, a local fire department brought in to help move her, could not lift her out of the wheelchair into the plane seats.

After half an hour of trying to move her, the captain asked them to leave the plane. Lufthansa spokesman Nils Haupt said, “We had 140 passengers on board, and they had connections and needed to travel. The question was never the seat belt. The question was the mobility of the passenger.”

Chuck Bennett reports for the New York Post that the couple again went back to the vacation home to make other arrangements as Vilma became sicker and sicker. Neither trusted the doctors in Hungary, especially because they wouldn’t be familiar with her lengthy medical history, Janos said.

Two days later, Janos found Vilma dead, and buried her in Hungary.

Now the couple’s attorney, Holly Ostrov Ronai, is considering a multimillion-dollar lawsuit against the airlines accusing them of violating laws protecting the disabled.

Struggle: In Prague although a local fire department were brought into to help move Mr Soltesz into three seats assigned to her, they could not lift her out of the wheelchair In Prague, a local fire department were brought into to help move Vilma.

Predicament: Mrs Soltesz had gained weight due to her illness and the airline said it did not have a seat-belt extender for her according to her husband Vilma and Janos Soltesz in the airport.

Difficulty: Mrs Soltesz struggling to get in the car Vilma Soltesz struggling to get in the car.

It should be noted that Vilma’s illnesses, especially diabetes, likely stemmed from her obesity. Extra weight takes a huge toll on our health, increasing the risk of type 2 diabetes, heart disease, stroke, many types of cancer, sleep apnea, senile dementia, and other debilitating and chronic illnesses. Obesity is also one of the leading preventable causes of death worldwide. On average, obesity reduces life expectancy by 6 to 7 years.

Read more on obesity-associated morbidity here.

~Eowyn