Tag Archives: bipolar disorder

14 medical conditions that can change your personality

Click on the embedded links for more on each disease.

(1) Alzheimer’s Disease:

Alzheimer’s, a type of senile dementia, affects your thinking, judgment, memory, and decision-making. It can make you feel confused and change how you act. Early on, you may be anxious or more easily annoyed. Over time, it can have more serious effects on your personality: A sweet, thoughtful person might become bossy and demanding, whereas someone who used to worry a lot or get stressed easily might become easygoing and content.

(2) Dementia with Lewy Bodies:

After Alzheimer’s, this is the next most common type of dementia. Clumps of unusual proteins, called Lewy bodies, form in the areas of your brain that control memory, movement, and thinking, thereby affecting you both mentally and physically. People who have it tend to become more passive, show little emotion, and lose interest in hobbies and other activities.

(3) Parkinson’s Disease:

While it might start as a little shakiness in your hand, Parkinson’s can eventually affect how you walk, talk, sleep, and think. Even early on, it can lead to things like obsessing over small details or a sudden carelessness. Later, you may seem absent-minded or not as social as you used to be. And it gets harder to keep your thoughts going in one direction.

(4) Huntington’s Disease:

This is an illness you’re born with, but it usually shows up in your 30s or 40s. It damages brain cells and affects every part of your life. You might have a hard time thinking clearly, or get angry to the point of hitting walls, or ignore basic things like brushing your teeth. And you may not even be aware it’s happening.

(5) Multiple Sclerosis (MS):

With this condition, your immune system attacks the nerves in your brain and spine. It can cause problems ranging from bladder issues to not being able to walk. In some cases, it can lead to a feeling of euphoria, where your happines is beyond normal and out of touch with reality. It can also bring on laughing or crying that seems out of control or not in line with how you really feel.

The thyroid makes hormones that tell your body how fast or slow to work. If it makes too much of those (hyperthyroidism), it can feel like someone stomped on the gas pedal. You might be irritable, anxious, and have big mood swings. If you don’t make enough of those hormones (hypothyroidism), your personality may seem flat. You may be forgetful and have a hard time thinking things through. It can have long-lasting effects on your brain if it’s not treated.

(7) Brain Tumor:

A tumor in your brain’s frontal lobe can affect the areas that handle personality, emotions, problem-solving, and memory. That can make you feel confused or forgetful. It can also cause mood swings, make you more aggressive, or trigger paranoid thoughts, like thinking people are “out to get you” when they’re not.

(8) Some Types of Cancer:

Tumors in the brain, spinal cord, and pituitary gland (which controls your hormone levels) can affect personality. So can adenocarcinoma, a type of cancerous tumor in cells that make mucus and other fluids which can occur in several parts of the body, including the breasts, colon, lungs, and pancreas.

(9) Stroke:

When blood flow to part of your brain gets cut off, the cells there don’t get enough oxygen and start to die. The effects depend on how long the stroke lasts and where in the brain it happens, which is why you need to get help ASAP. You might not be able to move some parts of your body, and it can change your personality in some ways. You might lose your patience more easily, have serious mood swings, or act more impulsively than you did before.

(10) Traumatic Brain Injury:

After a serious blow to the head, changes in personality can be a hidden symptom that happens over time. In more serious cases, you may seem like a different person, saying or doing things you never would have in the past.

(11) Depression:

As it comes on, this reaches into every part of your life. It not only affects your mood, but also the kinds of things you think about, your memory, and how you make decisions. It changes how you think about the world around you. It can be very different in men and women: Women often feel worthless, sad, and guilty, while men tend to feel tired, irritated, and angry.

(12) Obsessive-compulsive Disorder (OCD):

OCD makes you feel anxious and have thoughts and urges you just can’t stop. For example, you might wash your hands over and over again. You might doubt yourself a lot and take a long time to finish simple tasks. It can get worse if someone criticizes you, because that feeds your anxiety.

(13) Bipolar Disorder:

This causes mood changes that go way beyond the normal ups and downs of daily life. When you’re up, you might feel jumpy, talk really fast, and take big risks. When you’re down, you might be worried, have low energy, and feel worthless. And sometimes, you might feel a mix of both. These intense changes can mess with your sleep and energy, and make it hard to think clearly.

(14) Schizophrenia:

This serious mental illness can make you hear voices and see things that aren’t there. You might believe things that have no basis in reality. At first, you just might not be as social as normal. As it gets worse, it can be tough to keep your thoughts on track, making it hard to even talk to people. And you may act in ways that are way out of character, hard to predict, and out of control.

Source: WebMD

~Eowyn

Drudge Report has gone to the dark side. Check out Whatfinger News, the Internet’s conservative frontpage founded by ex-military!

Please follow and like us:
error0
 

Liberal utopia of Seattle: Squatter terrorizes homeowner, gets 30 hours comm. service & court-appointed treatment program

Seattle has a homeless crisis that is exasperated by the fact that the bureaucrats do not enforce laws related to loitering, trespassing, public defecation, drug use and prostitution.

See the following:

A homeowner in the Magnolia area of Seattle tried to sell her house this past summer and was stalked by a “squatter” who had mental issues. The squatter claimed the house was his, trespassed on her property and tried to introduce himself as the new homeowner.

The homeowner called into the Dori Monson show to share her story. As reported by MyNorthwest.com:

“Soon after Lisa (name changed) put her Magnolia home on the market in late July, she said that a strange man began intruding on her property and in her home, acting like he lived there; setting up tents on her property, sometimes with another man; taking photos of her yard and neighbor’s yards and putting them on social media; introducing himself to neighbors as the new buyer of the house; and attempting to get into their homes by pretending to be an exterminator.

“We didn’t know what this guy was capable of for a long time, and so we were being as vigilant as we could … You don’t know what type of person you’re dealing with,” she said.

Lisa, who has since sold the house, had said at the time that despite living in terror for a week, police did not go after the Magnolia squatter in a timely fashion; it was not until after her story had been featured on the Dori Monson Show multiple times that police finally gave her a response she felt was appropriate to the situation.

“It took going on the show to get any response,” she said.

That said, she remains very grateful for the diligence and attention shown to her case after that by a Seattle Police Department task force.

“They came by the property every single day … I was really pleased with the response that we ended up getting after the show, so a shoutout to SPD,” she said.

While this was going on, Lisa figured out the man’s address and workplace through some sleuthing of her own. She gave this information to police, who initially said that they could not do anything because he lived out of their jurisdiction, but later were able to go to the man’s house and arrest him.

However, the Magnolia squatter spent just “24 hours and 10 minutes” in jail, according to Lisa. She pressed charges — which resulted in a grand total of a protection order, a $25 bail charge, and 30 hours of community service for the man.

“Only 30 hours of community service, Dori, for all that we endured — 30 hours of community service,” Lisa said.

In court, the man revealed to the judge that he has ADA-recognized bipolar disorder and was in a manic episode at the time of the squatting and stalking. “I empathize with people who are going through difficulties like that,” Lisa said, but “it doesn’t make it okay to terrorize a neighborhood and put everybody through what he did. There have to be consequences, regardless of what’s going on.”

Luckily, the judge did order the man to obtain mental health treatment, which Lisa sincerely hopes will aid him. While she is disappointed that he did not serve a greater sentence for all of the fear and emotional turmoil he caused her, she no longer worries about the effect that this man will have on her life.

“I do think that this person was really sick, and that breaks my heart, but they’re getting away with too much still, and we have to constantly think about our safety in this city … I hope that he’s getting the help that he needs,” she said.”


I’d bet the odds are pretty high that this squatter isn’t going to attend court-mandated mental health treatment program. And that the odds are pretty high will keep hearing about criminal activities in Seattle going unchecked.

DCG

Better than Drudge Report. Check out Whatfinger News, the Internet’s conservative frontpage founded by ex-military!

Please follow and like us:
error0
 

Is That You, Sinéad?

Sinéad O’Connor, 44, was backing singer for Natty Wailer at the recent Bray Seaside festival in Ireland.
Source: Daily Mail
On 24 August 1990, O’Connor was scheduled to perform in Holmdel, New Jersey. Shortly before the show was to begin, she refused to go on if the American national anthem was played, saying she “will not go on stage after the national anthem of a country which imposes censorship on artists. It’s hypocritical and racist.” Venue officials acquiesced to her demand and omitted the anthem, and so O’Connor performed, but they later permanently banned her.
Married three times, O’Connor outed herself as a lesbian in a 2000 interview in Curve, “although…I’ve gone out with blokes…I actually am a dyke.”Soon after, she declared in another interview in The Independent that “it was overcompensating of me to declare myself a lesbian…I am not in a box of any description.” Then in 2003 she stated that while most of her sexual relationships had been with men, she has had three relationships with women. Finally, in a May 2005 issue of Entertainment Weekly, she stated, “I’m three-quarters heterosexual, a quarter gay.”
On an 4 October 2007 broadcast of The Oprah Winfrey Show, O’Connor disclosed that she had been diagnosed with bipolar disorder four years earlier, and had attempted suicide on her 33rd birthday on 8 December 1999.
~Eowyn

Please follow and like us:
error0