Tag Archives: Berkeley

Guess the yearly price tag to reduce homeless in Alameda County, California

Homeless encampment in Berkeley, Alameda County

There are over 1.5 million people in Alameda County. According to the study cited in this story, “…5,600 people experience homelessness on any given night. Over the next five years we aim to reduce that number to less than 2,200 people. If we achieve this goal no one will have to sleep outside.”

Take a wild guess as to how much money is required to achieve their goal. Then double or triple your number.

From SF Chronicle: Every person sleeping on the streets of Alameda County could be placed into housing or shelters if the county more than triples its spending on key programs, a new report says.

There is no obvious source for the more than $200 million a year needed — on top of more than $100 million already being spent annually — to achieve that goal, officials say. That has prompted talk of a potential tax proposal on the 2020 ballot.

The report is an update to a plan crafted more than a decade ago and adopted by Alameda County and its 14 cities seeking to end homelessness by 2020. The problem has grown since then, and the new report says it can be fixed by 2023 — with additional funding.

“When we wrote the 2007 plan, we said homelessness is a solvable issue. We wanted it to be true, but we weren’t sure. We were just building databases,” said Elaine de Coligny, executive director of Everyone Home, the effort to address homelessness in Alameda County.

“We have a lot more information now than we did a decade ago. We are confident in the solutions and strategies. We just haven’t been doing them at the pace and scale required,” she said.

The county spends about $106 million a year on homeless-related programs and subsidizes 3,000 permanent housing units. The report from Everyone Home, which was started by Oakland, Berkeley and county agencies, says those numbers should be $334 million and 9,000.

Sara Bedford, who is on the leadership board of Everyone Home, said reaching the goal is feasible. “I think we do a disservice if we’re not ambitious and realistic at the same time, and I think the plan does both of those things,” said Bedford, director of the Human Services Department of Oakland. “It’s very doable to achieve a functional zero — that you are housing people almost as quickly as they come into homelessness.”

Short of a San Francisco Proposition C-style tax increase or bond measure, that level of funding isn’t expected anytime soon. East Bay officials are beginning to contemplate putting such an initiative on the 2020 ballot.
Meanwhile, the report says, for every homeless person who found housing in 2017, two more became homeless. More than 12,000 people are homeless at some point each year in Alameda County. On any given night, the figure is 5,600.

The report says that if that number can be cut down to 2,200 people, with the additional funding, then no one would have to sleep outside, because there would be enough shelter and housing to go around.

Read the whole story here.

DCG

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Gov. Jerry Brown pardons five "nonviolent" illegal aliens facing deportation

jerry brown
According to Brown’s office: Kidnapping, robbery, using a firearm, inflicting corporal injury, intent to terrorize and obstructing a police officer are now classified as “nonviolent crimes.”
That’s California for you…
From Sacramento Bee: Amid a brewing legal battle with the Trump administration over California’s liberal immigration policies, Gov. Jerry Brown on Friday granted pre-Easter pardons to five immigrants illegal aliens facing possible deportation.
They were among 56 pardons and 14 commutations that the Democratic governor handed down ahead of the Sunday holiday. The majority were convicted of drug-related or other nonviolent crimes, according to Brown’s office.
Executive clemency is particularly significant for immigrants, since they can be deported for old convictions, even if they have legal resident status. By forgiving their criminal records, Brown eliminates the grounds on which they could be targeted for removal from the country.
“These are individuals who have turned their lives around and deserve a second chance,” said UCLA School of Law Professor Ingrid Eagly, who represents two of the immigrants pardoned Friday. She added that the stakes are higher since the election of President Donald Trump, who has emphasized stricter immigration enforcement.
“Under the current administration, there’s much more of a focus on deportation. More individuals are being picked up and placed into deportation proceedings,” Early said. “There’s also less discretion being exercised by immigration agents on the ground and by immigration prosecutors.”
The pardoned immigrants are:

  • Sokha Chhan, who is in the custody of Immigration and Customs Enforcement pending deportation to Cambodia. He came to the United States at the age of 13 to escape the Khmer Rouge regime and has lived here for 35 years. Chhan was sentenced in 2002 for inflicting corporal injury on a spouse or cohabitant and threatening a crime with the intent to terrorize, both misdemeanors; he served three years probation and 364 days in jail. In his clemency application, one his five children, whom Chhan raised as a single father, wrote that he had shown her “what it meant to be a loving and independent individual.”
  • Daniel Maher, who has publicly advocated for immigrants with a criminal record to have an opportunity for redemption. Maher moved to California from Macau legally when he was 3 years old, according to KQED, but he never applied for citizenship and he lost his green card when he was sentenced in 1995 for kidnapping, robbery and using a firearm (as a prohibited possessor). He served five years in prison, before being released early for good behavior, and three years on parole. Maher now oversees the curbside recycling program in Berkeley and has been recognized by the city for training at-risk youth for green jobs. He was detained, but not deported, by ICE in 2015.
  • Phann Pheach, who was born in a refugee camp in Thailand and came to the United States at the age of 1, according to a GoFundMe account set up by his wife. Pheach was convicted in 2005 for possession of a controlled substance for sale and obstructing a police officer; he served six months in prison and 13 months on parole. Pheach has been detained by ICE and is facing deportation proceedings to Cambodia, “a place he never once knew,” his wife wrote on the fundraising page for his legal defense. “He is the glue that holds his family together,” she added. “I am crumbling apart without my husband, who I have been with for over 10 years.”
  • Francisco Acevedo Alaniz, who was convicted for vehicle theft in 1997 and served five months in prison and 13 months probation. In his clemency application, he reported being active in his church and volunteering with a youth sports program.
  • Sergio Mena, who was sentenced in 2003 for possession of a controlled substance for sale and served three years probation.

Immigration has been at the center of a political showdown between California and the Trump administration. Earlier this month, U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions filed suit against California for three new laws passed last year to protect immigrants living in California illegally.
Brown slammed Sessions for “initiating a reign of terror” against immigrants illegal aliens in California and accused the federal government of “basically going to war” against the state. Days later, Trump visited California for the first time as president and dismissed the state as “totally out of control.”
During the past year, as federal immigration authorities have escalated their enforcement efforts, Brown has regularly included immigrants in his annual Easter and Christmas acts of clemency.
Read the rest of the story here.
DCG

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Public nudity is just "self-expression"

A 49-year-old woman was arrested in Saratoga Springs, NY, for strolling through a lumber store in the nude.
The UK’s Daily Mail reports, May 17, 2012, that last Tuesday, Barbara Lefleur shocked the customers at Curtis Lumber Store as she traipsed through the aisles stark naked, told an employee to “have a good day” and asked for the time.
A photo of the incident, obtained by TimesUnion.com, was shared on Facebook later in the day and instantly swept the web.

Born free: Barbara Lefleur, of Saratoga Springs, New York, strolls into Curtis Lumber shop on Tuesday - to the shock of employees and customers

Police received a call after the naked woman was seen again at nearby Stewart’s Shop along Route 67, where she was approached by a manager who asked if she was aware she was naked. By the time the police arrived, she had put some clothes on.
LeFleur brushed off the incident, insisting it is her right to walk freely in the nude as a form of “self-expression.”
Saratoga County District Attorney James Murphy said LeFleur is charged with misdemeanor public lewdness and could face 90 days in jail. Murphy said in a statement: “While the defendant claimed she was merely expressing her freedom to be fully liberated by walking nude into Stewart’s and Curtis Lumber, this alleged conduct is actually a crime under the penal law.” He added: “Surprisingly, mental health found no psychiatric issues whatsoever.”
Lefleur is a massage therapist and singer-songwriter who is self-employed. According to her LinkedIn profile, she also claims to be a longtime content product manager at Delmar Cengage Learning, where she helps “shepherd projects through the production process.” She writes on her profile that her goal is “to enjoy life fully by maximizing my potential in all areas of interest and expertise.”
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Lefleur’s mistake was to roam naked in Saratoga Springs. If she were in Berkeley Berserkley, California, no one would bat an eye.
Naked people were among those in 2007 who sat in trees to protest the cutting of a small grove of oak trees to make way for the earthquake retrofitting of a sports stadium at the University of California, Berkeley.
The World Naked Bike Ride in 2010 was held on June 19 in Berserkley.
Every year, Berserkley holds the Annual Nude and Breast Freedom Parade. You can see pics of very ugly naked people at the 9th Annual Parade here.
And then, of course, there’s Berserkley’s famous Naked Guy, aka Andrew Martinez.
Martinez began appearing naked in public in September 1992, his second year as an undergraduate at UC Berkeley. He led a campus “nude-in” to protest “social repression,” insisting that clothes were a tool for class and gender differentiation. Campus police first arrested him that fall for indecent exposure when he jogged naked near dormitories late on a Saturday night. But the county prosecutor refused to prosecute, concluding that nudity without lewd behavior was not illegal.
The university then banned nudity on campus. But, being feckless wimps, the university did not enforce its own policy. So The Naked Guy, which became Martinez’s official moniker, continued to stroll around campus naked, including sitting naked in lecture halls.

Naked Guy Martinez in a Berkeley lecture hall. Imagine what it must be like to be the unfortunate student sitting next to him, even worse to be the next student sitting in his chair!

He dropped out of college but continued living in Berserkley and eventually was arrested for public nudity by the city police. He fought those charges and won. For many months, it was legal to walk around nude in Berserkley. That summer, I saw two women walking on Bancroft Avenue on the south side of the UC campus, all naked except for clogs. A man in his 60s was also seen leaving a coffee shop on Bancroft, all naked, except for a trail of toilet paper stuck to his behind.
There is nothing less sexy than the naked human body, in daylight, especially under the noon day sun.
After Martinez attended a City Council meeting naked, the city council finally adopted an anti-nudity ordinance in July 1993.
As the years went by, Martinez’s mental illness became more evident (as if it wasn’t evident before!). On January 10, 2006, he was arrested after a fight at a halfway house and charged with two counts of battery and one count of assault with a deadly weapon. He was placed in maximum-security custody in Santa Clara County Jail in San Jose, a city south of Berserkley.
On May 18, 2006, 33-year-old Martinez was found with a plastic bag cinched around his head. He was taken to Valley Medical Center, where he was pronounced dead of apparent suicide.
See also my post, “Being Left and Going Naked“!
~Eowyn

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Fukushima Radiation to Reach West Coast April 5-6th

[youtube=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JqJ-M47ntNg]

Rainwater in California Measured 181 Times The Acceptable Limit For Drinking Water

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The Intel Hub
April 3rd, 2011

Officials at UC Berkeley have tested rain water that turned out to be 181 times the limit for drinking water. This is happening at the same time that our FAKE corporate media is telling the sheeple that there is absolutely nothing to worry about.
“As shown in the graph below, published by UC Berkeley, Iodine-131 peaked at 20.1 becquerels per liter, a measure of radioactivity, on the roof of Etcheverry Hall during heavy rains a week ago. The federal maximum level of iodine-131 allowed in drinking water is 0.111 becquerels per liter,” The Bay Citizen reported Saturday.

The Norwegian Institute of Air Research is also predicting that moderate levels of radiation will hit the U.S. west coast on April 5th and 6th.
Read full article here:
https://theintelhub.com/2011/04/03/rainwater-in-california-measured-181-times-the-acceptable-limit-for-drinking-water/
~LTG

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