Tag Archives: Arctic sea ice extent

Al Gore, who predicted North Pole would be ice-free by 2016, was paid $320k by Australian govt to conduct ‘climate training’

Nearly 9 years ago, on December 14, 2009, at the UN Climate Change Conference in Copenhagen, Denmark, Al Gore predicted that the North Pole would be completely ice-free in 5 to 7 years, i.e., by 2014 to 2016 (2:14 mark):

“There is a 75% chance that the entire North Polar ice cap during . . . some of the summer months could be completely ice-free within the next five to seven years.”

Not only has the North Pole or Arctic ice cap not melted, the figure below, from the National Snow and Ice Data Center, shows that the Arctic sea ice extent for May 2019 was a massive 4.70 million square miles (12.16 million sq. km.). The magenta line shows the 1981 to 2010 average sea ice extent for the month of May, which, as you can see for yourself, shows that Arctic sea ice has not diminished since 1981.

But that hasn’t stopped the Australian government from paying Al Gore $320,000 of Australian taxpayers’ money to “lead” the recently-concluded 41st Climate Reality Leadership Corps training in Brisbane, Australia, June 5-7, 2019.

As described by the Climate Reality Project:

Climate Reality’s 41st training will explore the climate challenges and opportunities relevant to Queensland specifically and the Asia-Pacific region generally. Led by former US Vice President and Climate Reality Chairman Al Gore, the training will include appearances from elected officials, business leaders, communications experts and top scientists, who will give attendees the skills and knowledge to address the climate crisis and seek fair solutions with their communities. As part of the training, participants will also learn how to give the presentation made famous by [Al Gore’s] Oscar-winning film An Inconvenient Truth and seen in the 2017 follow-up film An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power.

“From dangerous heat waves and storms to the threatened loss of crop yields and the Great Barrier Reef, few places in the world have seen the impacts of the climate crisis more than Australia and the Asia-Pacific,” said Al Gore. “However, in the face of these impacts, Australia, New Zealand, and Pacific Island nations have a tremendous opportunity to champion solutions for a low-carbon, sustainable future, and have the tools needed to transition to a clean energy economy. These nations and their diverse coalitions fighting for a better future represent the hope that we can and will make the changes needed to solve the climate crisis.”

Joanne Nova, an Australian science writer and author of The Skeptic’s Handbook, points out the irony that while Al Gore was “leading” the Climate Reality Leadership Corps training:

Fittingly, The Gore effect strikes again. Snow fell in Queensland. (The last time it fell was 2015.)

H/t Big Lug

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~Eowyn

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If Earth is warming, why is Arctic sea ice as thick as in 1940?

Sun, 08 Jan 2017 01:09:38 +0000

eowyn2

Government agencies and corporate media bemoan the melting and thinning of Arctic sea ice — indicative of the scourge of man-made global warming:

Extraordinary melting of Arctic sea ice in 2012!

Arctic sea ice declining at a rate of 13.3% per decade!

The Arctic to be devoid of sea ice by September 2016!

[But then…] Record low Arctic sea ice, November 2016!

Here’s a screenshot of the first page of results when I Google-searched for “Arctic sea ice melting”:

screenshot-of-google-search-results-for-arctic-sea-ice-melting

Writing for The Deplorable Climate Science Blog on Jan. 3, 2017, tonyheller provides the screenshot below of government and news agencies claiming that Arctic sea ice is getting thinner:

arctic-sea-ice-getting-thinner

But is that true?

Tonyheller presents the empirical evidence, which I verified and updated.

(1) In 1940, Arctic sea ice was about 2 meters thick

On February 23, 1940, the Townsville Daily Bulletin of Queensland, Australia, reported that Soviet explorers to the North (Arctic) Pole obtained ice measurements of an average 6½ feet (1.98 meters).

townsville-daily-bulletin-2-23-1940(Source: Trove – National Library of Australia)

(2) In 1958, Arctic sea ice was about 2 meters thick

On October 19, 1958, the New York Times reported that Arctic sea ice was “on the whole” about 7 ft. (2.13 meters) thick.

screen-shot-of-nyt-10-19-1958

(3) In 2017, Arctic sea ice is — wait for it — about two meters thick

Below is the Danish Meteorological Institute‘s map-diagram of the Arctic Sea Thickness for January 6, 2017, which shows that most of the Arctic sea is covered by ice from 2 to 3 meters thick.

dmi-arctic-sea-ice-thickness-1-6-2017

But Jeff Nesbit of U.S. News wrote on Dec. 28, 2016:

“global warming is now permanently altering the region in ways that will have untold consequences. In fact, the Arctic system has changed so dramatically that it may now be vulnerable to tipping points that affect the entire planet.

For instance, a significant portion of the ice that covers the Arctic Ocean during the long winter used to be ‘multi-year’ ice – which means that it was there over a long period of time and never melted. That’s no longer the case, and partially explains why sea ice in the Arctic right now is dramatically lower than it’s ever been at this time of year.

NASA satellites (the ones that would likely be shuttered if the incoming Trump administration shifts the agency’s mission completely away from earth sciences) and scientists on the ground estimate that multi-year ice used to make up a fifth of the ice cover in the Arctic just 30 or 40 years ago. Today, it’s at 3 percent.

The implications of this should be obvious, even to people who think climate change is a hoax or a political invention by progressives. The planet has warmed rapidly in a very short period of time, over decades. And in the region most sensitive to that warming, the ice at the top of the world that used to remain there all the time is now disappearing almost entirely during the summer. The ‘multi-year’ ice that served as a barrier against ice disappearing entirely is now gone. We will see essentially ice-free summers in the Arctic soon.”

The only problem with the claim that multi-year ice has diminished to just 3% of the Arctic sea ice is this GIF map of the ages of Arctic sea ice in March 2016, from the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) of the University of Colorado, which shows nearly half of the Arctic sea was covered by multi-year ice (colors that are not dark blue).

arctic-sea-ice-age-in-yearsnsidc-arctic-sea-ice-age

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~Eowyn

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