Tag Archives: #2A

This is Chiraq: Four teens shot in four hours

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Year to date: 1,295 people shot in Chiraq. Rahm must be so proud.

From Chicago Tribune: Four teenage boys were shot over four hours in Chicago, including a 16-year-old killed in the South Shore neighborhood, according to police.

The 16-year-old was shot in the head around 9:20 p.m. Wednesday in the 7700 block of South Marquette Avenue on the South Side, police said. Officers responding to a call about gunfire found the boy on the ground outside, police said. He was taken to Northwestern Memorial Hospital, where he was pronounced dead.

On the West Side, two other boys, 14 and 17, were shot around 1:15 a.m. Thursday in the Little Village neighborhood, apparently with a rifle, police said. Officers responding to a call about gunfire found the boy on the ground outside, police said.

The boys were in a maroon truck near 25th Street and Trumbull Avenue when another vehicle pulled up and someone opened fire, police said.  The older teen was wounded in the back, and the other boy was wounded in the foot.  They were taken to Mount Sinai Hospital, where their conditions were stabilized, police said.

Rifle casings could be seen near the intersection where the shooting took place. Less than two miles away at Mount Sinai, officers surrounded the truck that was pocked with several large bullet holes.

On the West Side just before 10:50 p.m. Wednesday, another 14-year-old boy was seriously wounded in the South Austin neighborhood, police said. He was walking in the 200 block of North Lockwood Avenue when someone opened fire, hitting him in the chest. He was taken in serious condition to Stroger Hospital.

Read the rest of the story here.

h/t Drudge

DCG

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Demand soars for concealed carry permits, data shows

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Shannon Watts hardest hit.

From Fox News:  The number of concealed carry permits in the United States has topped 15 million over the last year, according to data collected by the Crime Prevention Research Center.

That’s the largest one-year increase ever in the number of permits issued, according to the research center. In July 2016, the center reported that 14.5 million people had concealed handgun permits. As of May of this year, the number is already 15.7 million.

John Lott, founder of the group and a Fox News columnist, said several states, including Arizona, Florida, Michigan and Texas, have seen a big jump in the number of gun permits issued. There are several reasons for the increase – most notably, a rise in women and minorities seeking to purchase handguns, Lott said.

“I think you’re continuing to see a change in the composition of people who go and get permits,” Lott said. “Women are growing at a much faster rate than men.”

Between 2012 and 2016, Lott said, the growth rate for women was twice as much as it was for men. He also said minorities are purchasing handguns at a higher rate compared to previous years.

Firearms instructors are reporting an increase in the number of black women learning how to use guns around the country, as noted in an earlier Fox News report. Gun instructors who teach self-defense courses say more women are looking toward guns to protect themselves against crime.

In a May 10 statement to Fox News, NRA spokeswoman Catherine Mortensen said women are the fastest growing segment of firearms buyers in the country. “The NRA is a natural home for women firearms owners,” Mortensen said. “Increasingly, women today don’t want to rely on a spouse or neighbor for protection. They want to be able to protect themselves and their families.

The Crime Prevention Research Center – a nonprofit, gun advocacy research group – releases an annual report each July documenting firearm statistics by citing numbers provided by state agencies. The center’s official report for 2017 is due in July but Lott said data already collected shows a significant increase in permits in a number of states.

Arizona had 272,622 such permits in 2016 and 315,107 as of May 2017. Florida had 1,581,742 last year compared to 1,755,580 as of April 30.

Lott noted other factors contributing to an increase in permits. “You’re seeing states making it easier for people to go and get permits,” he said.

In contrast, states like California and New York have among the toughest requirements for permits in the nation. 

In Sacramento County, as of December 2016, residents are “required to pay $220 in application fees, pass a state criminal background check, take a 16-hour training course and have approval of the sheriff’s department by having ‘good moral character’ and a good reason to have CCW,” according to the center.

DCG

Second Amendment case Peruta vs. California may be heading to Supreme Court

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Dean Erwin Chemerinsky: No right to have concealed weapons

If this does make it to the Supreme Court, I’m certainly hoping for an outcome which favors legal firearm owners.

From Fox News: The Second Amendment is only 27 words, but Americans have used millions of words arguing over what it means. It guarantees “the right of the people to keep and bear arms.” But which people, what arms, and under what circumstances?

Two milestone cases involving the Second Amendment that reached the Supreme Court are District of Columbia v. Heller (2008), declaring an individual has a right to own a firearm, and McDonald v. City of Chicago (2010), affirming the Second Amendment applies to state law.

Now, if the Supreme Court decides to hear it, there may be a third major case in a decade: Peruta v. California.

At issue is the right to keep and bear arms outside the home. The Heller case specifically applies to situations within the home. Those who have petitioned the Supreme Court to hear the case are hoping the justices will see it as a logical extension of their earlier opinions.

The case arose when Edward Peruta and other gun owners who lived in or near San Diego, Calif., couldn’t get concealed-carry permits in their county. The Sheriff’s Department handles permit requests and requires “good cause” to carry a gun outside of the home. This does not mean a generalized concern for safety, but something specific, such as fear of domestic violence or a regular need to move large amounts of money.

There were two separate lawsuits challenging the interpretation of “good cause,” but the district courts found no violation of the Second Amendment.

Then, in 2014, a three-judge panel on the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled 2-1 that the policy did indeed violate the right to bear arms for self-defense. The state, however, got a new hearing in front of 11 9th Circuit judges, who decided 7-4, the restrictions for concealed-carry permits were allowable.

The case has now been appealed to the Supreme Court and though the Justices have rescheduled its consideration several times, some experts feel the court is finally ready to hear Peruta.

“I suspect they’re going to grant it,” said John Eastman, former law dean at Chapman University and the director of the Center for Constitutional Jurisprudence. Eastman told Fox News, “it’s percolating all across the country.”

He also feels the justices may have put it off while waiting for a full complement on the court, which they got when Neil Gorsuch was confirmed last month. Gorsuch, in fact, may be the justice to tip the opinion in one direction or the other, as previous Second Amendment cases were determined in a 5-4 ruling.

According to Eugene Volokh, professor of law at University of California at Los Angeles, this case is primed for the Supreme Court, as it deals with a basic constitutional right and “the lower courts are split on the issue.”

It would be a good time for the highest court to step in and settle the controversy. He also feels that while no one is sure how Gorsuch will vote, there is a “sense that he’s sympathetic to a broader view” of the Second Amendment.

The case may turn on how the court frames the issue. To Erwin Chemerinsky, dean of the University of California Irvine School of Law, the legal question to be settled is whether a state like California may determine its own rules on concealed-carry permits.

“The Second Amendment isn’t an absolute right,” Chemerinsky notes. Throughout British and American history, “there’s never been a right to have concealed weapons.”

But Eugene Volokh believes there’s a bigger issue at stake. If the state of California, which essentially bans open carry of a gun, makes it next to impossible for a typical citizen to get a concealed-carry permit, this is “tantamount to banning” the right to bear arms “except for a few favored people.”

Experts agree on one point. As Chemerinsky puts it, if Peruta is taken up, “no matter what the Supreme Court says, it will be a landmark decision.”

DCG

The solution to Chiraq’s gun violence: Yo-Yo Ma to perform at ‘Concert for Peace’ in Chicago

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Yo Yo Ma: Bringing a cello to the gunfight

Over Mother’s Day weekend, Chiraq saw 3 dead and 13 shot (at the time of my writing this post). To date, Chiraq has had 962 people shot and wounded.

Apparently all it takes to address the out-of-control gun violence is a cello performance. Who knew?

From ABC7: Famed cellist Yo-Yo Ma will join other performers for a concert aimed at reducing violence in Chicago. The Concert for Peace is scheduled for June 11 at St. Sabina Church on the city’s South Side. The Chicago Symphony Orchestra Association says Ma will perform with members of the Civic Orchestra of Chicago and the Chicago Children’s Choir. The Rev. Michael Pfleger also will speak during the concert.

All proceeds will go toward anti-violence and employment programs at St. Sabina. Ma is a creative consultant for the Chicago Symphony Orchestra. Ricardo Muti is music director.

Ma and Muti teamed with Pfleger in planning the concert. They say it builds on their belief that art and music play a critical role in solving issues facing the community.

DCG

This is Chiraq: 45 shot, 2 fatally, in Easter weekend violence

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Guess they need more gun control laws, or something.

From MyFoxChicago: Two men were killed and at least 43 other people were wounded in shootings across Chicago over the Easter holiday weekend.

Most recently, a 33-year-old man was shot on the CTA Red Line platform at the Garfield Station on the South Side. He was arguing with another male on the platform in the 200 block of West Garfield when the male took out a handgun and fired multiple shots, according to Chicago Police. The man was shot in the head and chest and taken to Stroger Hospital, where he died.

At 2:27 a.m. Sunday, 23-year-old Tywan Anderson and a 19-year-old man were shot by another male while they were standing outside in the 1300 block of South Fairfield in the Douglas Park neighborhood on the Southwest Side, authorities said. Anderson, whose home address was not known, suffered gunshot wounds to the head and back and was taken to Mount Sinai Hospital, where he was pronounced dead at 2:57 a.m. The 19-year-old was shot in the left hand and also taken to Mount Sinai, where his condition was stabilized.

The weekend’s latest nonfatal shooting happened about 12:25 a.m. Monday in the West Garfield Park neighborhood on the West Side. A 40-year-old woman was standing with a group of people in a vacant lot in the 300 block of South Kilbourn when she heard shots and felt pain, police said. She suffered a gunshot wound to the abdomen and was taken in serious condition to Mount Sinai Hospital.

Less than an hour earlier, an 18-year-old man was shot in the West Englewood neighborhood on the South Side. He was driving at 11:27 p.m. Sunday eastbound in the 2300 block of West 58th Street when a gray car pulled alongside his vehicle and someone inside fired shots, striking him in both legs, police said. The man was taken to Holy Cross Hospital, where his condition was stabilized.

At least 40 other people were wounded in citywide shootings between 4 p.m. Friday and 6 a.m. Monday. At least 24 of those victims were shot between 5 p.m. Saturday and 6 a.m. Easter Sunday.

Last weekend, seven men were killed and at least 28 other people were wounded in shootings across Chicago. More than 900 people have been shot in the city so far this year, according to Chicago Sun-Times data.

DCG

Latest firearm legislation in Washington state focuses on protecting victims

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Brainchild of this bill, Drew Hansen

Victims in Seattle of serious crimes wait for more than an hour for police assistance. Also, Seattle neighborhoods hire their own security because police are a rare sighting in their areas. Color me skeptical that the police (at least in the larger cities) are well equipped and staffed to notify a domestic violence survivor in a timely manner.

From MyNorthwest.com: In 2014, Washington State voters approved universal background checks for gun buyers. But what happens to felons, domestic abusers and others who fail those background checks and illegally try to buy a gun? Not much, as it turns out. However, there’s an effort in Olympia to change that.

The idea behind House Bill 1501 began with a conversation between State Representative Drew Hansen (D-Bainbridge Island) and another lawmaker last year.

“If a criminal tries to buy a firearm from a gun store and fails a background check, does law enforcement get notified? Do domestic violence survivors get notified if criminals are ineligible because of a restraining order? Do cops on the street get notified?” Hansen asked. “The answers to those questions are no, no, and no. Our bill makes the answers to those questions yes, yes, and yes.”

The bill adds teeth to the universal background check law. “We had over 3,000 failed background checks in Washington state last year,” Hansen said. “About half of which were failed because the purchaser was a criminal or fugitive … That is a lot of dangerous people trying to buy firearms.”

“If you walk into a gun store and you know you’re ineligible and you try to buy a firearm anyway and get caught and turned down, there should be an investigation, an arrest, and, in appropriate cases, prison time.”

King County Prosecutor Dan Satterberg agrees. When voters passed universal background check law, there was an implied understanding that there would be consequences for someone who fails a background check, he said.

Hansen says one of the key parts of the legislation is making sure victims, especially domestic violence survivors, are notified when their abuser is trying to arm themselves.

Lying on an application is a felony, and under federal law punishable by up to 10 years in prison. Right now, however, there really isn’t much follow up happening. The legislation would target domestic abusers, felons, people who have been involuntary committed, and people with warrants.

It would also require failed background checks to be reported to local law enforcement. The Washington Association of Sheriffs and Police Chiefs would also maintain a statewide system to handle the notifications for domestic-violence survivors.

State grants would help local police agencies pay for the needed follow-up. Prosecutors and local law-enforcement agencies, including the Seattle Police Department, support the legislation. Hansen says they worked closely with the National Rifle Association to ensure Second Amendment rights were protected.

Hansen says it passed out of the House with overwhelming bipartisan support — so he’s hopeful they’ll get this one on the books this session.

DCG

Bullet-Proof Vests Suggested For Children in Chiraq

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Is this what it takes to protect children in Chicago?

All those gun control laws in Chiraq and gun violence is still out of control. Good job demorats!

From CBS Chicago: After a violent day in the South Shore neighborhood, a longtime resident questioned why there is no the outrage from black activists. “I see them coming out always downtown protesting against the police. But never do I see them inside the black community,” activist Tio Hardiman said.

Hardiman of Violence Interrupters visited the South Shore neighborhood after seven people were killed in three separate shootings less than 12 hours apart on Thursday.

Hardiman said he wasn’t joking when he suggested that “young people in the South and West Sides of Chicago be equipped with helmets and bullet-proof vests.”

Doc. Matt Harrington, CEO of Ammo Coding Systems, was with Hardiman. He’s behind legislation that would require ammunition manufacturers to make bullets traceable. “Bullets just don’t come from a bullet fairy.”

Chicago’s 9-1-1 operators are supporting this legislation. There has been a heavy police presence in this neighborhood.

DCG