Seattle weighs rules (regulations) for work schedules

Seattle officials began discussing this issue back in February – see my post about this here. The council members spearheading this are concerned with employees having what they call a “livable schedule.” Liberals love the term “livable”, especially when they can use it to force private businesses to meet their “progressive” demands.
government solve all problems
From the Seattle Times: Jerry Cole has a landscaping business. Four years ago, in order to make ends meet, he took on a second job as a courtesy clerk at the Rainier Beach Safeway. But the scheduling demands of the second job — including erratic hours and a schedule that isn’t posted until three days before the workweek starts — makes it difficult to do his first job.
“It’s hard to schedule my landscaping business with clients on a regular basis because I’m having to juggle my landscaping around when I have to be at Safeway week to week,” he said.
Stories from workers such as Cole are spurring some Seattle City Council members and Mayor Ed Murray to devise a scheduling law that could affect thousands of workers and many retailers in the city.
Worker and employer representatives are meeting — in separate groups — to pin down what they want, or at least what they can live with.
Business groups, including the Washington Restaurant Association, seem to accept that some kind of scheduling regulations are coming down the pike, and are quietly striving for rules that won’t be too onerous or inflexible.
But behind the scenes some heated words are already flying. “I now am questioning if you are trying to help people or just penalize businesses for being in business,” retired Starbucks President Howard Behar wrote in an email, addressed to Councilmember M. Lorena González and copied to other members, on the scheduling issue. “I am disgusted with this city government.”

Councilmember Lorena González

Councilmember Lorena González


In the two official working groups, ideas on the table from the workers’ representatives include:

  • Two weeks’ advance notice of schedules
  • A minimum of 11 hours’ rest between shifts, except when workers voluntarily choose to work with less rest
  • An hour of additional “predictability pay” when an employer changes a worker’s posted schedule
  • Up to four hours’ pay for workers who are assigned shifts that are either canceled, or reduced to less than four hours, with less than 24 hours’ notice
  • Offers of additional hours must go to existing part-time employees before new employees can be hired

Some business representatives have suggested more limited measures, including:

  • One week advance notice of schedules
  • 10 hours’ rest between shifts
  • An hour of additional “predictability pay” only for changes to the posted schedule initiated by employers

The business group is still discussing the remaining issues proposed by the worker representatives: pay for workers whose shifts are canceled or reduced, and giving part-time workers preference if more work hours are available.
Both groups are reportedly leaning toward having the law apply to large retailers and franchises, although specifics of what constitutes “large” and whether local restaurants should be included are still being hammered out.
An online survey of both workers and managers is under way to get a better idea of scheduling practices around the city and how those practices affect workers’ lives.
lisa herbold
González, who, along with Councilmember Lisa Herbold is spearheading the scheduling issue on the council, anticipates bringing legislation to the full council in August.
The goal, González said, is to “recognize the needs of business to be nimble in their scheduling practices, but also provide maximum protection to the most number of workers so we’re delivering on the promise of economic security to hourly workers.”
Read the rest of the story here, including Starbuck’s stance on this proposal (Starbuck’s is not participating in Seattle’s employer group talks yet they are answering questions for the city council).
DCG

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lynnmccrann
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lynnmccrann

​Jerry Cole must be a lousy landscaper if he cannot make ends meet.

MomOfIV
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MomOfIV

sounds like seattle has created its own unofficial union and they are using elected representatives to do the collective bargaining without allowing businesses any bargaining chips or negotiations….in other words, seattle will force businesses to close or simply relocate elsewhere

SapphireSunday
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SapphireSunday

At least the Swiss wisely and soundly defeated a proposal to give every citizen, and even foreign legal residents, a check for about $2500 per month just for existing. https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/worldviews/wp/2016/06/05/free-money-no-thanks-say-swiss-voters/
I wouldn’t count on such a referendum failing in Seattle or any other progressive enclave in the U.S.

Auntie Lulu
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Auntie Lulu

With all the edicts we see coming out of Seattle, I am left wondering . . . is there an increased degree of depression and anxiety in that area of the country? I would just think that the heavy load of government getting into everyone’s business that it must be stressful for individual people having to contend with the on-going heaps of regulations. I should imagine that as many people who feasibly can would exit this city and move elsewhere, just to preserve their sanity.

truckjunkie
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truckjunkie

SHHhhhhh!! Don’t give ’em any ideas!!

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Glenn47
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Glenn47

I think all the pine trees up there have sucked all the oxygen out of the air. We haven’t heard an intelligent thing come out of Seattle in a long time.

Joe
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Joe

No wonder Seattle has become a major factor in The Gigantic Left Wing Freak Show!