Risk of Breast Cancer Among Young Women: Relationship To Induced Abortion

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Below is an abstract from a 1994 study done by the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and University of Washington Dept of Epidemiology in Seattle. The complete study is available from the link.
~LowTechGrannie

Design by BKeyser



Background: Certain events of reproductive life, especially completed pregnancies, have been found to influence a woman’s risk of breast cancer. Prior studies of the relationship between breast cancer and a history of incomplete pregnancies have provided inconsistent results. Most of these studies included women beyond the early part of their reproductive years at the time induced abortion became legal in the United States. Purpose: We conducted a case-control study of breast cancer in young women born recently enough so that some or most of their reproductive years were after the legalization of induced abortion to determine if certain aspects of a woman’s experience with abortion might be associated with risk of breast cancer.
Methods: Female residents of three counties in western Washington State, who were diagnosed with breast cancer (n = 845) from January 1983 through April 1990, and who were born after 1944, were interviewed in detail about their reproductive histories, including the occurrence of induced abortion. Case patients were obtained through our population-based tumor registry (part of the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program of the National Cancer Institute). Similar information was obtained from 961 control women idenified through random digit dialing within these same counties. Logistic regression analysis was used to estimate odds ratios and confidence intervals (CIs).
Results: Among women who had been pregnant at least once, the risk of breast cancer in those who had experienced an induced abortion was 50% higher than among other women (95% CI = 1.2-1.9). While this increased risk did not vary by the number of induced abortions or by the history of a completed pregnancy, it did vary according to the age at which the abortion occurred and the duration of that pregnancy. Highest risks were observed when the abortion was done at ages younger than 18 years—particularly if it took place after 8 weeks’ gestation—or at 30 years of age or older. No increased risk of breast cancer was associated with a spontaneous abortion (RR = 0.9; 95% CI = 0.7-1.2).
Conclusion: Our data support the hypothesis that an induced abortion can adversely influence a woman’s subsequent risk of breast cancer. However, the results across all epidemiologic studies of this premise are inconsistent—both overall and within specific subgroups. The risk of breast cancer should be re-examined in future studies of women who have had legal abortion available to them throughout the majority of their reproductive years, with particular attention to the potential influence of induced abortion early in life. [J NatI Cancer Inst 86:1584-1592, 1994]
http://jnci.oxfordjournals.org/content/86/21/1584.abstract?ijkey=c2ba7197c27b0a06a26cd85d26b079b0aed9bce2&keytype2=tf_ipsecsha

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0 responses to “Risk of Breast Cancer Among Young Women: Relationship To Induced Abortion

  1. Well don’t expect “Planned Parenthood” to make this information available to their “clients”…

     
  2. In addition to abortions, Planned Parenthood also provides cancer screening services and receives funding from Susan G. Komen-Race for the Cure. Susan Komen died from breast cancer at age 33. Was it an undisclosed side effect of a teen abortion?

     
  3. Icons from my 1950s childhood. Any boomer who grew up in Seattle will recognize them!

     
  4. Pingback: Tweets that mention Risk of Breast Cancer Among Young Women: Relationship To Induced Abortion | Fellowship of the Minds -- Topsy.com

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