Police scanners record location and movement of every car in America

Eye of Sauron

It is not enough that the Obama regime’s National Security Agency (NSA) collects our every email, phone call, credit card purchase, and bank transaction. Our police departments now have records on the location and movement of your cars — all done in the name of protecting us from “terrorists” and criminals.

The images of our cars and license plates are taken by automated scanners affixed to bridges and buildings, or mounted on police cars, like the one below.

Police car with license plate scannerA Police Dept. squad car outfitted with a license plate scanner mounted to the trunkAn Alexandria, VA Police Department squad car outfitted with a license plate scanner mounted to the trunk (photo by Pablo Martinez/AP) 

But it turns out that license plate scanners actually produced only a small fraction of “hits,” or alerts to police that a suspicious vehicle has been found. Which then begs the question of what’s the real reason why our government is recording our cars’ every movement and location.

Anne Flaherty reports for the Associated Press, July 17, 2013, that your local or state police departments have photographs of your car in their files, noting where you were driving on a particular day, even if you never did anything wrong.

According to a study published July 17, 2013, by the American Civil Liberties Union, law enforcement agencies across America, using automated scanners, have amassed millions of digital records on the location and movement of every vehicle with a license plate, Affixed to police cars, bridges or buildings, the scanners capture images of passing or parked vehicles and note their location, uploading that information into police databases. Departments keep the records for weeks or years, sometimes indefinitely.

As the technology becomes cheaper and more ubiquitous, and federal grants focus on aiding local terrorist detection, even small police agencies are able to deploy more sophisticated surveillance systems. While the Supreme Court ruled in 2012 that a judge’s approval is needed to track a car with GPS, networks of plate scanners allow police effectively to track a driver’s location, sometimes several times every day, with few legal restrictions. The ACLU says the scanners assemble what it calls a “single, high-resolution image of our lives.”

“There’s just a fundamental question of whether we’re going to live in a society where these dragnet surveillance systems become routine,” said Catherine Crump, a staff attorney with the ACLU. The civil rights group is proposing that police departments immediately delete any records of cars not linked to a crime.

Law enforcement officials said the scanners can be crucial to tracking suspicious cars, aiding drug busts and finding abducted children. License plate scanners also can be efficient. The state of Maryland told the ACLU that troopers could “maintain a normal patrol stance” while capturing up to 7,000 license plate images in a single eight hour shift.

“At a time of fiscal and budget constraints, we need better assistance for law enforcement,” said Harvey Eisenberg, chief of the national security section and assistant U.S. attorney in Maryland.

Law enforcement officials also point out that the technology is legal in most cases, automating a practice that’s been done for years. The ACLU found that only five states have laws governing license plate readers. New Hampshire, for example, bans the technology except in narrow circumstances, while Maine and Arkansas limit how long plate information can be stored.

“There’s no expectation of privacy” for a vehicle driving on a public road or parked in a public place, said Lt. Bill Hedgpeth, a spokesman for the Mesquite Police Department in Texas, which has records stretching back to 2008, although the city plans next month to begin deleting files older than two years. “It’s just a vehicle. It’s just a license plate.”

In Yonkers, N.Y., just north of the Bronx, police said retaining the information indefinitely helps detectives solve future crimes. In a statement, the department said it uses license plate readers as a “reactive investigative tool” that is only accessed if detectives are looking for a particular vehicle in connection to a crime. “These plate readers are not intended nor used to follow the movements of members of the public.”

But even if law enforcement officials say they don’t want a public location tracking system, the records add up quickly. In Jersey City, N.J., for example, the population is only 250,000 but the city collected more than 2 million plate images on file. Because the city keeps records for five years, the ACLU estimates that it has some 10 million on file, making it possible for police to plot the movements of most residents depending upon the number and location of the scanners, according to the ACLU.

The ACLU study, based on 26,000 pages of responses from 293 police departments and state agencies across the country, also found that license plate scanners produced a small fraction of “hits,” or alerts to police that a suspicious vehicle has been found. In Maryland, for example, the state reported reading about 29 million plates between January and May of last year. Of that amount, about 60,000 — or roughly 1 in every 500 license plates — were suspicious. The No. 1 crime? A suspended or revoked registration, or a violation of the state’s emissions inspection program accounted for 97% of all alerts.

Eisenberg, the assistant U.S. attorney, said the numbers “fail to show the real qualitative assistance to public safety and law enforcement.” He points to the 132 wanted suspects the program helped track. They were a small fraction of the 29 million plates read, but he said tracking those suspects can be critical to keeping an area safe.

Blah. Blah. Blah.

When will the American people wake up to the realization that, by forfeiting our freedom and our privacy to Big Brother in exchange for the elusive promise of “security,” we have made a Faustian bargain?

~Eowyn

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0 responses to “Police scanners record location and movement of every car in America

  1. It’s actually a lot worse than you know.

     
  2. My vehicle is an extension of my home, yes I do have the right of privacy.

     
  3. Great post Dr. Eowyn,
    What’s funny is that these Barney Fife wannabes will now be so glutted with useless information, it will be worse that knowing nothing at all.

     
  4. This is absolutely incredible! How much of the taxpayers money is wasted on this kind of stuff!

     
  5. the eye was a very nice touch!!!

     
  6. All this surveillance is going nowhere. The system is going broke and all their information will go to waste because noone will be driving very far any longer and there won’t be anything further to talk about on the phone or write about in an email. So, they will go down the drain with their own system. Good riddance.

     
  7. Pingback: Police scanners record location and movement of every car in America | The D.C. Clothesline

  8. Thank you Dr. Eowyn for this wonderful post. Indeed, there is a Faustian bargain on tap here and just the inference of the devil’s involvement should indicate clearly the fraud being perpetrated.

     
  9. I was just seeing how many scanners
    People use to talk to police officers.

     

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