Parents upset over ‘personal’ survey offered at school

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Fox59.com: Some parents in Noblesville (Ind.) aren’t happy about a survey their middle schoolers filled out at school. They want to know who’s behind the optional survey that they said got way too personal.

“They crossed the line when they entered the home,” said Michelle Bracewell. Bracewell said some of the questions her seventh grade daughter answered were invasive. Her daughter took the survey on her iPad at Noblesville West Middle School.

The survey asked about drug and alcohol use, which Bracewell said was understandable, but she became bothered when she found out what other statements the survey solicited.

It asked for student responses to statements like, “People in my family have serious arguments,” and, “People in my family often insult or yell at each other.” “Those are personal questions, and if I want people to know what’s going on inside my home, I’ll let them know,” said Bracewell.

Bracewell said her child’s instructor told the class the survey was optional.

Other parents were concerned, too. Comments popped up on Facebook, with some parents saying they are very upset over an “issue of rights,” and others calling the survey “data mining, and a 100% violation of privacy and trust.”

Ruth Gassman

Ruth Gassman

“We ask these questions for purposes of public health,” said Ruth Gassman, Executive Director of the Indiana Prevention Resource Center. Gassman says 150 school corporations across the state voluntarily agree to the Indiana Youth Survey, which has been offered across the state for more than twenty years. The survey’s offered in sixth through twelfth grades, and Gassman said each school decides which grades in which they’ll distribute the survey.

The data is used to tailor drug and alcohol awareness programs, some of the questions are used to probe risk factors in the home. “These items are referred to ask risk and protective factors for alcohol, tobacco, and drug use,” said Gassman.

But this year, in a pilot program, the IPRC asked students for their birthdate and initials, still optional, but parents claim that’s an invasion of privacy, too. “It’d be very easy to go back and look at a birthdate and initials and see who the child was,” said Bracewell.

Gassman said that initial and birthdate information is not stored, instead it’s used to assign a generic numerical identification number to track students’ responses over a course of years.

A spokesperson for Noblesville Schools said the survey was made optionally available to middle school students.

FOX59 wanted to know if any teachers forced their classes to complete the survey. A spokesperson did not return our email or answer any of our follow up questions.

Click here to be directed to a sample copy of the sixth grade, and seventh through twelfth grade surveys. Rules from the IPRC state that students must be informed their participation is voluntary.

Here’s some questions from the surveys:

  • During any time in your life, has either of your parents or guardians been sent to Iraq, Afghanistan, or other combat zone because they are in the military? (Military includes Army, Navy, Marines, Air Force, National Guard, and Reserves.)
  • During the past 12 months, how often have you bet/gambled for money or valuables in the following ways? Gambling can be done in a variety of settings, including with family and friends. (Some answers include bingo, March Madness and lottery.)
  • Would your parents know if you did not come home on time?
  • How often do your parents tell you they’re proud of you for something you’ve done?
  • In the past year (12 months), how many of your best friends have regularly attended religious services?
  • If a kid carried a handgun in your neighborhood, would he or she be caught by the police?

I’m surprised they didn’t ask about any firearms in the home.

DCG

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0 responses to “Parents upset over ‘personal’ survey offered at school

  1. That’s survey sounds more like the twisted government mining for information and using our public schools to do so. It’s creepy and so common in the Obamination government of which we now are treated as subjects rather than citizens.

     
  2. The public needs to prepare questionaires regarding the motives, plans, behaviors, and more of those serving us.

     
  3. Parents ought to teach their children this acronym in the these cases : N.O.Y.G.D.B.

     
  4. What was the purpose of asking . . . in the last 12 months how many of your close friends have attended religious services? This seems most curious? It doesn’t ask if “you” have attended religious services . . . .

     
  5. If I had a child in this school, this is how they would have answered these questions:
    During any time in your life, has either of your parents or guardians been sent to Iraq, Afghanistan, or other combat zone because they are in the military? (Military includes Army, Navy, Marines, Air Force, National Guard, and Reserves.)
    Yes – my dad is a SEAL sniper.
    During the past 12 months, how often have you bet/gambled for money or valuables in the following ways? Gambling can be done in a variety of settings, including with family and friends. (Some answers include bingo, March Madness and lottery.)
    During the last election, I bet my brother $20 that I could torch every democrat campaign sign in our subdivision without being caught. I won.
    Would your parents know if you did not come home on time?
    You mean in the event I was kept after school and forced against my will to attend a sensitivity training class?
    How often do your parents tell you they’re proud of you for something you’ve done?
    All the time – especially when I routinely beat the crap out of the crunchy liberal kid that lives down the street.
    In the past year (12 months), how many of your best friends have regularly attended religious services?
    They all have perfect attendance at the same Mosque.
    If a kid carried a handgun in your neighborhood, would he or she be caught by the police?
    Beats me. Ask the cops.
    -Dave

     
  6. This should be blatently obvious, its the state interrogating kids about things the parents may not be as likely to answer to profile homes and communities, profiling is illegal, by the way.
    For example: the asking about friends attending religious services is a roundabout way of building a religious profile of the students, since students in the same class or grade will likely have other friends in the same class or grade, this is basically a “rat out your friend to the state” question, since initials and birthdates can be compiled with teacher notes, etc. to extrapolate who the children are friends with this data can then be compiled into a bigger picture, without necessarily asking for names and affiliations directly. It can also be used to generate a religious profile of the parents as well (and likely will). Since the federal government sees Christianity as a “terrorist threat” this is nothing short of trying to build a database of “potential terrorists” a la “pre-crime” stuff which is becoming popular (a la predpol).
    The question about a kid carrying a hand gun is designed to probe neighborhood/community connectedness, that is, how much neighbors will support their neighbors in such an event, and whether or not they will talk to police (thus also indicating whether cops are viewed as helpful or hurtful, demonstrating whether the community’s loyalties are with the state or with their neighbors).
    Other questions relating to gambling and other abuses give away the stability of the kid’s environment, something that a school doesn’t need to know, but rather that a child who is believed to be in danger should tell to a good Christian person, be it their family pastor, psychiatrist, or medical doctor. This is basically the state probing the home environment and “looking for an excuse” to kick in the door. Although there is a possibility that it could be further used to find vulnerabilities in the child’s nature to exploit for other and more vile purposes (Such as if the corrupt and pedophile/pedosadist-supplying CPS can “lawfully” kidnap the children or not, and make them “wards of the state” and subject to all manner of further horrors.)
    All things considered, this “optional survey” may look relatively banal, but it really is intended to data mine and profile students, their parents and their neighborhoods/communities.

     
  7. If you wanna see real profiling go and ask an IB PYP student about the enless personal attitude surveys they are forced to complete every year as part of the International Baccalaureate indoctrination program. Those guys keep student profiles and attitudes on a central server in IBO Switzerland, not accessible to parents or carers. That’s creepy!

     
  8. This NWO info trolling of children has been going on for along time post WWII. I was in grade/middle school during the 50’s and in our schools we were given a “voluntary” survey to fill out. Those who agreed to the survey got a day off and field trip to a science museum. Those who refused had a regular school day, pop quiz and got to clean erasers.
    I still remember some of the questions like:
    If you had to chose 1, would you burn the flag? or the Bible?
    If you heard your parents saying bad things about the government would you turn them into the authorities?
    Do you believe in a god?
    Does you family attend church on a regular basis?
    Does anyone in your family drink alcohol or use drugs?
    There were a lot of other questions many related to being good party members
    MY parents went ape when I told them the test we took, they showed up at my school demanding an explanation. Dad always spoke about commies covertly taking over the country.

     
  9. Teachers should be given a similar survey:
    Have you ever smoked pot?
    Have you ever drank an alcoholic beverage?
    Have you ever participated in any form of gambling including Super Bowl pools or March Madness?
    Any answer in the affirmative would be grounds for immediate dismissal. The data could be used to tailor drug and alcohol awareness programs, some of the questions used to probe risk factors in the classroom.

     

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