What's so funny about abortion?

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Sun, 29 Jan 2012 11:00:13 +0000

eowyn2

Last Sunday, Jan. 22, 2012, was the 39th anniversary of the Supreme Court’s landmark Roe v Wade decision.

In the name of a woman’s “right to privacy” under the due process clause of the Constitution’s 14th Amendment, the floodgates were opened to legalized abortion. In those 39 years, more than 54 million (54,559,615) tiny human beings were killed.

Have you ever listened to the Roe v Wade arguments?

Sarah Weddington was the young attorney who represented “Jane Roe” (real name Norma McCorvey) before the Supreme Court. The legality of abortion hinges on the unborn not being recognized as a “person” in the U.S. legal system. Not being recognized as “persons” in turn means that the unborn human life has no constitutional right to protection of “life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.”

All of that is curious to say the least, given the Supreme Court’s 2010 ruling that business corporations are “persons” under the law.

During Weddington’s appearance before the Supreme Court in the Roe v Wade hearing, every time when the subject of whether the unborn is a “person” came up, there was laughter in the audience. You can hear the tittering at the 0:33 and 1:00 marks in this audio:

Go to this site for another audio. Laughter can be heard at the 24:00 and 24:10 marks, every time someone said “If it was established that a fetus were a person under the Constitution….”

So my question is:

What is so darn funny about abortion? What is so funny about discussing killing “a fetus” an unborn human being?

Norma McCorvey speaks for pro-life, 2009

In 1994, 21 years after Roe v Wade, “Jane Roe” Norma McCorvey converted to Christianity and expressed remorse for her part in the Supreme Court decision. She began working in the pro-life movement, such as Operation Rescue. In 1998, at age 51, McCorvey was formally received into the Roman Catholic Church. At the same time, she declared she was no longer a lesbian.

Sarah Weddington speaks at pro-abortion rally, 2004

Sarah Weddington enjoyed much professional success after Roe v Wade. She was a legislator in the Texas House of Representatives from 1972 to 1977; General Counsel for the U.S. Department of Agriculture in 1977; and a special White House advisor in the Carter administration, during which time she helped appoint Ruth Bader Ginsburg to a federal judgeship. Weddington is currently an adjunct professor at the University of Texas at Austin. Now 67 years old, she remains unrepentant and continues to advocate abortion. In 2004, she was one of the speakers at a March for Women’s Life in Washington, DC.

~Eowyn

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