Here’s a brilliant Halloween costume idea…

Florida campaign promotes ‘hoodie Halloween’ following death of Trayvon Martin

Daily Mail: A campaign in Florida fears one of the scariest Halloween costumes this year may be one already in your closet.

Fuelled by the death of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin who was shot while wearing a hoodie, the Halloween Hoodie Campaign is hoping to encourage a stand against negative stereotypes by donning the same hoods this season.

‘I’m a black man, are you afraid of me now?’ a YouTube video captures men and women of various races, including family of Trayvon, asking the camera as they cover themselves with a hood.

The hoodie is this ubiquitous piece of clothing that everyone wears but when black people wear it, it’s interpreted as a symbol of criminal activity,’ one of the campaign’s creators Gauis Benbow told the Orlando Sentinel.

Mr. Benbow and his partner Rochelle Oliver, both of Miami, hope it’ll inspire discussion, especially in connection to Halloween and what people perceive to be the scariest costumes of today.

‘This isn’t about being pro-Trayvon. It’s about being anti-stereotyping,’ Ms Oliver told the paper. ‘Seeing someone wearing a hoodie on Halloween will hopefully allow people to examine what they are feeling if they are scared or why they may be judging the person as a threat.’

Making a cameo in the short minute-and-a-half film is however Trayvon’s uncle, Ronald Fulton. Confined to a wheelchair as a  quadriplegic, black male, Mr. Fulton says he already has a number of  challenges against him, but when it comes to stereotypes, the list can  go on. People think that because I’m in a wheelchair that I’m stupid or slow but when you get to know me, you’ll realize how wrong that is,’ Mr Fulton told the paper.

‘I think this can lead to constructive dialogue about the issues surrounding my nephew’s death,’ stereotypically he said, without going into the criminal case. ‘I’m still a black man,’ Mr Fulton says in the video while donning a hood. ‘Are you afraid of me now?’

Trayvon Martin wasn’t shot merely because he was wearing a hoodie. But never let an unfounded crisis go to waste.

Seems to me the ones that are perpetuating stereotypes are these folks. A black guy walking on the street wearing a hoodie is automatically considered to be committing a crime? A person in a wheelchair is automatically assumed to be stupid? How insulting to law-abiding black kids and intelligent folks that use wheelchairs.

DCG

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0 responses to “Here’s a brilliant Halloween costume idea…

  1. No matter how much the Left huff and puff, they simply cannot change this REALITY:

    The majority of punks and thugs who rob and steal, esp. convenience stores with security cameras, wear hoodies. Why? To conceal their faces and therefore their identities. Gives new literal meaning to the word: Hoodlum.

    You watch: Soon there’ll be a hue and cry to ban the word because it’s raaaciiiist!

     
  2. I would be hesitant to open my door to a trick or treater wearing a hoodie. I will always associate hoodies with thugish behavior!

     
  3. The black hip-hop culture created this hoodie fear long before Trayvon came along, and now they want to gripe about it? They did it on purpose, to create a climate of fear. They got what they wanted, and now they’re blaming us. This article was printed in 2006.

    “Hip-hop artists popularized the hoodie as a rather sinister garment in the 1970s. According to a 2006 article in The New York Times:
    The sweatshirt hood can work much like a cobra hood, put up to intimidate others. But even more important is its ability to create a shroud of anonymity. This came in handy for at least two types of people operating in hip-hop’s urban breeding ground: graffiti writers and so-called stick-up kids, or muggers. Wearing a hoodie meant you were keeping a low profile, and perhaps up to something illegal.
    By the 1990s, as hip-hop’s popularity spread, big-name clothing designers such as Tommy Hilfiger and Ralph Lauren included the hoodie as a primary component of their collections.
    Campbell says black teens often wear hoodies for two reasons: to remain obscure and undetected, or to project a “don’t mess with me” image.”

     
  4. Oh, and by the way, it’s got nothing to do with race, it has to do with thuggery. See “8 Mile” starring Marshall Mathers, aka Eminem, aka Slim Shady, white as the driven snow hoody-wearing hip-hopper with an arrest record as long as my arm, author of lyrics like “Slut, you think I won’t choke no whore, till the vocal cords don’t work in her throat no more?”. I would be just as afraid to meet him on a dark street.

     
  5. They’ll soon be banning hoodies.

     

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