Harrowing account of woman, 51, surviving COVID-19 living alone

It is one thing to say that COVID-19 computer models and deaths have been exaggerated (which is true), and that state and local governments’ policy of lockdown should end because of the destruction to the economy (see “End the COVID-19 lockdown! Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp proved right“).

A staggering 52% of American small businesses, if they haven’t already closed, expect to close within six months because of the lockdown. The lockdown directly caused a loss of one-fifth of all U.S. jobs. From mid-March to May 8, 2020, 20.6 million U.S. jobs were lost, including more than a million in health care, resulting in an unemployment rate of 14.7%, a level not seen since the Great Depression in the 1930s.

But it’s another thing entirely to maintain that COVID-19 or whatever one wants to call it, is fake, not real, and does not actually exist.

Recently, I ended a friendship with an online colleague (we came to know each other through our separate work on Sandy Hook) because she insists that SARS 2, aka Wuhan coronavirus, aka COVID-19, is “fake,” i.e. not real.

In emails, I repeatedly asked her what, then, she thinks “it” is — referring to the many many cases of severe respiratory illnesses and deaths. She refused to answer my question, because she couldn’t, and accused me of being difficult.

I then asked outright if she believes this to be an off-the-scale vast, global conspiracy in which every medical personnel (scientists, doctors and nurses) is complicit. She replied “yes.”

When it comes to the empirical world, there are no absolute truths because we simply don’t know everything or 100% of any phenomnon. There are always questions and pieces that don’t seem to fit, and so the proper approach is to look at the preponderance of evidence.

In the case of COVID-19, however, to seize upon the little pieces-that-don’t-fit,  while ignoring the preonderence of evidence, and leap to the conclusion that the virus or disease doesn’t actually exist is not only poor epistemology, it is also intellectually arrogant, thinking oneself smarter than the countless scientists and physicians across the world who are studying and grappling with this pandemic.

Unsolicited and uninvited, my colleague then called me on the phone and tried to browbeat me into submission, despite my saying that I didn’t want to talk to her. If I were in her shoes, I would respect her wishes, say “Well, let’s talk when you feel up to it,” and let her go.

But she persisted and simply refused to honor my wish of not wanting to talk about it. In so doing, not only did she violate my free will, trample across my personal space, she also showed she really isn’t my friend because a friend would respect my boundaries. I actually had to hang up on her.

So for her and all who deny that COVID-19 is real, below is a harrowing first-person account of how Michelle Benvenisti, a woman living alone in New York City, survived COVID-19. The symptoms and duration of her illness far exceed those of the seasonal flu.

Benvenisti, 51, is the senior director of learning and development at WebMD Health Corp. Her essay does not give her age, but I found that information via a people search engine and can confirm she is real. I wanted her age to determine if she’s in the elderly (65+) group particularly vulnerable to COVID-19. She’s not.

Benvenisti is on LinkedIn and Facebook.

Michelle Benvenisti, “I Fought COVID-19 Living Alone. Here’s What Got Me Through,” WebMD, May 18, 2020:

Somewhere in the middle of my battle against COVID-19, I began to think I was going to die. And even worse than that – I thought I was going to die alone. Anyone who lives alone has likely wondered and worried at some point how they would get help if something serious happens to them. COVID-19 turned that fear into a stark and startling potential reality for me.

COVID-19 is an isolating illness. Everyone is left to fight it alone to some degree. People in the ICU are rarely, if ever, allowed visitors. If you live with other people, you have to isolate yourself in a separate room so you don’t give it to others. And when people like me who live alone get it, we must fight the emotional, mental, and physical battle by ourselves. I consider myself to be an independent woman. I live in NYC, have traveled to over 50 countries and take care of myself. But fighting this illness alone in my apartment tested me in ways I could have never imagined. It was the hardest, most terrifying experience of my life.

Day after day I struggled with serious breathing issues. Each breath I took was so shallow I was afraid to go asleep because I feared I wouldn’t wake up. I also had a fever, dizzy spells, shivers, pneumonia, excessive thirst, nausea, mild pink eye, a rash, lack of appetite, loss of smell, and mounting anxiety. My body was the weakest it has ever been. I felt like I was down to just 10% of my usual self, and I didn’t have the security of knowing someone was on the other side of the door to check on me and ensure I was alive.

On one of my worst days, I woke up thinking I was a bit better, so I took a shower – only to get so dizzy that I blacked out, collapsing on the bathroom floor. When I regained consciousness, I realized I had knocked all sorts of things over trying to drag myself to my couch.

At that point I realized that even though I was physically alone, I couldn’t ride this out alone. I had to search for and seek out sources of support to get me through this. Here are 3 things I recommend that helped me triumph over this terrifying illness.
Rely on technology to stay connected
I’m lucky to have an amazing family – two brothers, a sister, and my parents – who were incredible through this. I ended up relying on video chats with them in ways I could never have imagined before getting the coronavirus. Video chats became a literal lifeline for me. This is a slow-moving virus, and I was so sick that I had no sense of perspective about how I was doing day to day. I relied heavily on telemedicine with the doctors and checked in regularly with my family as they monitored my progress, telling me if they were seeing improvements or not.
My sister helped me with breathing exercises through Facetime. And after I passed out in the bathroom, I feared it happening again, so I would call her on my iPhone and leave it in the bathroom while I showered so she could keep tabs on me until I was done.
Sharing my experience through social media was also an extremely beneficial way to feel connected to others. Initially I hesitated to do so, but after several challenging weeks, I posted my experience, along with my offer to help others with COVID-19, on Facebook. The response, support, suggestions, love, and prayers I got in return was astounding. What a gift it was. There is great power in having a sense of community, so even at the depths of my weakness, I forced myself to respond to calls and messages and participate in my city’s daily 7 p.m. clap for frontline workers. I knew I needed to draw in strength and support from any way I could get it.
Accept socially distant help when it’s offeredEven if you feel alone, you are not. Look around. There are likely people who want to help you, so say yes when they offer. Or if you need something – ask. This one was hard for me.
At my age, I never thought I would come to rely so heavily on my parents. I was losing weight rapidly and didn’t have the strength to do anything about it. While they live over 30 minutes away, my 78-year-old mom and 82-year-old dad would drop off matzoh ball soup, nutritious meals my brother made, Gatorade and fruit, leaving it in a bag on a railing outside my building. Going downstairs while following all of the precautions, including wearing a mask, gloves and spraying disinfectant in my wake, was exhausting. I lost 17 pounds, but I truly believe my family’s efforts kept me alive and literally nursed me back to health from afar.

Prioritize mental health – in addition to physical health

This virus is incredibly taxing emotionally, so even while sick, I had to remind myself about taking care of my mental health. Each time I heard or read the news of a devastating COVID-19 story, it added to my anxiety and worsened my breathing. Instead, I streamed live animal and nature programs and forced myself to stay positive with constant reminders from my friends that “you’re okay”, “you will get through this” and “you’re stronger than the virus.” I recall one evening where my anxiety was at its worst, fearing I wouldn’t make it through the night. I spoke with my mother and father (who is a psychologist), expressing that I had been afraid to fall asleep for fear that I wouldn’t wake up. They gave me advice on how to manage my nightly anxiety. This taught me a lesson that while I am incredibly blessed to have that support in my life, we have to lean on people who can be positive and give us strength, especially when we don’t have it.It took me 26 days to finally feel 60% of myself, and I am still working on reconditioning myself back to normal. I kept hearing it takes 14 days to recover, but the reality is that the worse your symptoms are, the longer it will take to improve.

This virus exacerbated my worst fear – dying alone – and I’m still rattled by that. I don’t know how long it will take for me to feel okay about that, so I’m trying to practice patience and nurture myself.

While I was relieved to learn that my second test results showed “negative,” and I’ve been cleared by the doctor to be outside while practicing social distancing, I’m still experiencing the isolation like so many others who live alone. I’ve even experienced some fearing my presence. Through all of this, I still feel that I am one of the lucky ones to have survived it and to be incredibly blessed for my family and friends who continue to be there for me every step of the way. I trust that, in time, this will all be behind us and we will all be able to re-engage with our loved ones again.

A Pew Research Center survey found that more than a quarter of Americans (28%) know someone who’s had COVID-19.

~Eowyn

Drudge Report has gone to the dark side. Check out Whatfinger News, the Internet’s conservative frontpage founded by a military veteran!

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Kelleigh Nelson
Kelleigh Nelson
1 month ago

I would wonder why she didn’t immediately call her physician and ask for hydroxychloroquine, azithromycin and zinc to be delivered to her apt. She probably could have lessened the horror. I have a niece who is a nurse in a rehab center and she contracted this evil virus. She was 4 days in hospital and told us that the worst part was the test as they stuck that thing up her nose until she said it felt like it went in her brain…yeesh! She’s in her early 30s and has 7 children, none got sick. Also, my dear friend JD… Read more »

TrailDust
Admin
1 month ago

Sad for your friend, Kelleigh. And for all the people in the world who have been attacked by this virus.

TrailDust
Admin
1 month ago

What a moving story! We need to seek God to help us show his love to those around us.

Lola
Lola
1 month ago

I have an a friend, not a close friend, but a college friend, who got it. She is a physician in the Air Force, but on extended leave due to long battle with breast cancer. She refused to go on a ventilator and directed her own care, with oxygen, antibiotics and hcq. not sure of all details, but it’s brutal . Her advice is don’t ever go on a ventilator . also know of a young super healthy neighbor who got it and said (to another neighbor) it feels like hot lava in the lungs. He chose to ride it… Read more »

anon
anon
1 month ago
Reply to  Lola

Have family member went thru this, avoided ventilator, used ‘hi flow O2’ machine, non invasive, no intubating compresses O2, also bought ‘O2 bar’ for home use, just in case …

Alexa
Alexa
1 month ago
Reply to  anon

What is an O2 bar?

chemtrailssuck
1 month ago
Reply to  Alexa

It’s like a home oxygenator.

Pearl
Pearl
1 month ago

The range of experience with this illness is really astonishing. Some people we are told, never knew they had it. The experience of this lady is extreme, but I can’t help believing that she would have been better off with loved ones caring for her. I am shocked to find that our modern society actually believes that sick people need to get well on their own strength. And it’s considered selfish and inconsiderate to allow even family to be in your presence and offer real care. This woman is mentally and emotionally warped by our isolationist society. I’m so sorry… Read more »

Kevin J Lankford
Kevin J Lankford
1 month ago

I have to say that for my self, the ‘preponderance of evidence’ appears to be propaganda.Not that I deny the existence of their engineered virus, but that its effects on people does not approach near the dangers claimed and do not justify the extreme irrational restrictions being place on this nation, which I realize you did express. I personally do believe the globalist do have enough of their puppets placed in enough positions of power and presumed trusted positions to pull off a world wide conspiracy, fauci and brix just their current face. Just like in the illegitimate obama presidentcy,… Read more »

Calgirl
Calgirl
1 month ago

If nothing else…the pandemic should teach us that any country screwing around w/viruses in designated experimental labs, without any sort of World watchdog overseeing the reason behind it, is as fatal to Earth life as any rogue country screwing w/nuclear weapons. That includes the USA. My eyes have been opened & I hope the eyes of many, too. It also sent up a red flag that no one, anywhere on Earth, is prepared to face anything like this…now, or in some future struggle with the like. It’s like the Chinese (or similar participant) playing w/fire, but without a fire extinguisher… Read more »

Boomp
Boomp
1 month ago

I suppose it’s out of the question to think this entire article is made up?

chemtrailssuck
1 month ago
Reply to  Dr. Eowyn

I think we should defund all bioweapons labs in the world.

Calgirl
Calgirl
1 month ago
Reply to  Boomp

Tell it to my 7th-grade student who lost his mother, a 40-yr-old vital community member, our PTA President, and activist member of the Soboba Indian Tribe here in So.CA. She died in quarantine while her husband, too was afflicted and quarantined from the rest of the family (he survived.) She was buried on her son’s 13th birthday, with no one but the immediate family present. Tell it to my cousin removed in PA, whose mother died quarantined, alone, in a nursing home. They cremated her and put her on a shelf until such time as the family could get together… Read more »

chemtrailssuck
1 month ago
Reply to  Calgirl

Read “The Holocaust Industry” by Norman Finklestein, or “Architects of Deception” by Juri Lina.

Calgirl
Calgirl
1 month ago
Reply to  chemtrailssuck

Write about it to try and change history, and, in this case the enormity of outcome defeats any attempt at deception or denial, in death or in living memory, i.e., the Democratic Socialist Republic of Germany was far too successful in their goals with mass annihilations to reverse historic review of outcome.   (PS….esp. loved the “Democratic Socialists Republic” rolling off my tongue….a la The Bern, and Alexandria Occasional Cortex, among others…what a “prosperous blueprint” in history to follow….NOT! IF you are a student of history, it all started with “free” health care to all from the previous Weimar Republic,… Read more »

chemtrailssuck
1 month ago
Reply to  Calgirl

And, “The winners write the history books.”
 

chemtrailssuck
1 month ago

It seems to be another virus that was tinkered with in a lab. They have some nasty ones like Ebola. What better way to get everyone to bend over and take a vaccine courtesy of Bill Gates et al than to unleash a man made virus? Not to mention what happens in NYC, they did the WTC attacks to them, all that toxic stuff in the air, then all the people that cleaned up, so many got cancers and died (Geiger counters, anyone?), who knows what they’re doing. Some evidence that wireless 5G helps bacteria become more immune to antibiotics,… Read more »