Give us a break, plead Seattle’s maligned millennials

millenials vs other generations

Don’t blame millennials…they have it much tougher


From Seattle Times: Give it a rest, boomers and Xers. Millennials have heard plenty by now about how they’re just the worst generation ever.
If their detractors are to be believed, they’re entitled, narcissistic, selfie-taking, self-absorbed, “everyone gets a trophy” brats, and they’re to blame for the demise of everything from cereal, paper napkins and bar soap to chain restaurants, the diamond industry and even democracy.
So stop, please, say some Seattleites who were born between 1977 and 2004 — that’s the Millennial Generation, depending on which definition you’re using.
“It’s completely unfair,” said Ashley Krzeszowski, 24, of West Seattle. “We’ve been handed a broken system and we’re just doing the best we can.”
Krzeszowski just graduated from the University of Washington with degrees in cellular, molecular and developmental biology and applied mathematics. She has a job at the same lab she’s been working at for the last few years and yet she is still living with her parents.
No need to judge, she said; it makes “prudent financial sense” for her to do so at this time and with the cost of housing in Seattle as high as it is. “As a group, we work hard and try hard,” she said. “But when my parents bought their house, it was two times their annual income and now houses are 10 times most people’s annual salaries.”
“Give us a break,” she said. “All we’re really asking for is enough pay for our phones, treat ourselves to a cup of coffee every once in a while and buy a dress off the sale rack. Is that really too much?”
Cheryl Kaiser, a professor of psychology at the University of Washington, admires the Millennial Generation and finds her recent crops of students a “joy to teach.”
They’re creative, unrestrained by convention and willing to take risks, she said. In addition they’ve grown up in tough times and have had to be a little more scrappy than their parents. They ought not take the criticism to heart. “Each generation tends to see the new generation as not as good as their own,” she said. “You see it all the time.”
The generation we belong to is part of who we are; we share norms, values and ideologies with our age mates, she explained. “If our generation does something in a specific way or holds specific values, we come to think of those as the right way, the good way and if one generation sees another doing something different, it can feel threatening, as if there’s something wrong with their way.”
“It’s easier to blame the other group and say they’re doing it wrong than it is to question how we’re doing it,” Kaiser said.
Tim Miller, a 52-year-old musician who plays music at Westlake Park with his friend, Paul Vegors, 24, said he knows that tendency well. “It’s silly, but it’s human nature really,” Miller said. “When you are threatened or in pain, you’re going to look around for someone to blame because someone else has to be responsible.”
In a piece written for The Center for Generational Kinetics, Curt Steinhorst writes that people in his generation do not like the phrase “millennial” as it brings with it connotations of laziness and entitlement. In downtown Seattle, a dozen or so young adults who were asked about their generation seemed to confirm that.
Many flinched when asked if they were millennials and then explained why they felt they were really a bit on the young side to be held accountable for such a litany of woes: the death of golf, vacations, the 9-5 workweek and the lowly cork.
“We’re just growing up, and it’s not all our fault,” said Sandra Quiroz, 19, who works near Westlake Center.
“Don’t they know that a lot of things that are going on are not really under our control?” said Pinkeo Phongsa, a 15-year-old visitor from California who believes she is in the much-maligned generation.
“I really think that everyone is just kind of looking for a scapegoat for a lot of things,” said Angela Olson, 24. “There are things about the way society is going that seem wrong, but it’s not all millennials’ fault. We can’t really take the blame as we were made this way.”
“They don’t want to blame themselves, so they blame us,” said 25-year-old William Co, who works at a tech firm near downtown Seattle. “Every generation blames the next one,” said Rian Ellis, 27. “Given enough time we’ll be complaining about the next generation as well.”
But maybe not. Perhaps age really does bring with it a little chance for wisdom, or at least a little charity.
“You can’t really blame them,” said 69-year-old Tim Micek. “They’ve got it much tougher than we did. They get nothing but my sympathy.”


Shortly after I scheduled this post, I came across this on the Daily Mail:
Millennials aren’t ready for the ‘reality of life’ and suffer from panic attacks and anxiety problems, research finds: Millennials aren’t ready for the ‘reality of life’ and suffer from panic attacks and anxiety problems, new research has revealed.
A study of 2,000 young people preparing to start university found that many aren’t ready for the challenges of living independently. 
The research found that more than half of prospective students don’t know how to pay a bill and that many believe that nights out cost more than paying rent. Researchers said that many would-be students have been left worried and confused by the prospect of leaving home to start higher education.
The study found 61 per cent of millennials are anxious about the prospect of starting university, while 58 per cent are having trouble sleeping and 27 per cent are having panic attacks.
Millennials…just doing the best they can.
DCG

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daveyone1
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David
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David

Boo-Hoo-Hoo, It’s unfair. Don’t pick on me. I live with my parents because it is financially better for “ME” while living cost is to high!. If I had to pay my own rent and utilities I could not afford a new electronic toy ever few month when a newer version comes out!!! It doesn’t matter that my parents got out on their own, ate beans and rice for years to survive and save so I would be brought up better than they were. Why should have to pay them rent, chip in on food money. Mom should spend her water… Read more »

Auntie Lulu
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Auntie Lulu

David . . . you nailed it!

Alma
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Alma

SATELLITES [from Seattle?] millennials are nothing but spoiled brats, voltures, living off their parents and finding excuses for not stepping out and making it on their own -it’s all been handed to them on a silver platter. If they inherited a broken system, why wait for others to fix it -make your contribution instead go and make it better for those less fortunate. Fight for your country and not let the Bernie Sanders inject their socialism you have been taught in class.

Anonymous
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Anonymous

comment image

Anonymous
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Anonymous

Concur…
“Millennials might as well be ‘Generation Hopeless’,” by Shannon Molloy, news.com.au via New York Post, 4 Jul 2017
https://nypost.com/2017/07/04/millennials-might-as-well-be-generation-hopeless/

Jurist
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Jurist

Please read my long reply below and tell me: why they should be hopeful?

D-FensDogG
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D-FensDogG

First of all… >>… “Pinkeo Phongsa, a 15-year-old visitor from California who believes she is in the much-maligned generation.” Pinkeo, eh? California, huh? Need I say more? >>… “Give us a break,” she said. “All we’re really asking for is enough pay for our phones, treat ourselves to a cup of coffee every once in a while and buy a dress off the sale rack. Is that really too much?” No, give ME a break! Sell your phone and buy some good books with the money. I can recommend many good books, none of which your teachers would approve of.… Read more »

Auntie Lulu
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Auntie Lulu

For Heck sakes . . . you don’t even have to buy books . . . visit your county library, get a library card, utilize the library, somebody paid the property taxes out of which the library system (at least in Portland, OR is financed through.) I could not agree more regarding the $8.00 designer cups of coffee. Nobody “needs” designer coffee . . . I think many people purchase Starbucks because they feel they have “arrived, they are part of the in-crowd who can afford to purchase” this absurdly priced coffee. Since we now have a generation of poor… Read more »

EddieBG..
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EddieBG..

Gi = GO… Look no further than the Govn’t Controled – NEA-Union run De-Education System of America for the past 40+ years.. The “Dumbing Down” of America is now feeding on itself & has become self-perpetuating.. i-e = The already dumbed down educators are now training our children from their own already “dumb-down” levels & perspectives. Put another way = “The Dumb are teaching – the Gonna be even Dumber.

Anonymous
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Anonymous
Jurist
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Jurist

What do the Boomers of FOTM think about: the claim that homes are now 10X annual income instead of 2X? True or false? That even with a $200,000 college degree, Millenials cannot find a job that pays enough that they can afford to raise a traditional, single-income family? That unlike in the 70s, there are today virtually no unskilled jobs that pay well enough that even with both parents working a family has a chance at a middle class life? That the Greatest Generation (Boomers’ parents) was the one that voted in the traitors who opened the floodgates to mass… Read more »

Jurist
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Jurist

A little more context: a $200K student loan, if paid back in the standard 10 years, will entail a monthly AFTER TAXES payment of about $1,350.

Jurist
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Jurist

A little more context. I live in a major metropolis known to be one of the most affordable big cities in America. Rent for a one-bedroom apartment in a non-seedy part of town: $1100 plus utilities. Cost of owning, maintaining, insuring, and fueling a very modest car: $500 Mandatory health insurance that doesn’t cover the first $6500 per year of medical bills: $150-$500 Groceries, not including any eating out: $300 Clothing, household goods, and sundries: $50 Coin-operated laundry: $30 Tenant’s insurance: $10-$20 Various vision and dental needs (assuming no cavities or major work needed): $20 Phone: $100 Total bills each… Read more »

Jurist
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Jurist

I know LAWYERS in the town I described above, who work in what can best be described as sweatshops (they don’t even get cubicles, let alone offices) for $19 per hour, no benefits, no overtime, and no guarantee that they won’t be laid off at a moment’s notice. Most of them are in their 40s and 50s,with spouses and children. Many are still paying off student loans, they require 2 or 3 bedrooms instead of 1, and their other bills are all higher, especially medical, and just to keep their law licenses current is another $100 per month. Lawyers. They… Read more »

Dr. Eowyn
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Long ago, I had advised students who said they wanted to be lawyers, that it is not a good idea because the U.S. already has a surfeit of lawyers.
https://www.wisegeek.org/what-percent-of-the-us-population-do-lawyers-comprise.htm
“According to the American Bar Association there are currently 1,116,967 lawyers practicing in the United States. That is approximately one for every 300 people, or approximately 0.36% of the total population. These statistics relate only to those currently practicing and maintaining their licenses. There are far more with inactive or retired status.”

Dr. Eowyn
Admin

P.S. The plight Jurist described is certain to worsen. Robots not only are taking over unskilled jobs, such as the fast food industry, they will also begin to make inroads into even skilled occupations, such as law and medicine. In truth, the high salaries commanded by many attorneys are high because the legal profession is in effect a trade guild. Once robots break into the monopolistic guild, those sky-high salaries will tumble.

Jurist
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Jurist

A few years ago (2013?) Forbes magazine made a list of the best and the worst jobs in America. The #1 worst job was Associate Attorney.
If I could do it all over again I might have gotten into robotics heheh.

Dr. Eowyn
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A couple of months ago, I saw the latest list with journalists as the #1 worst job. LOL

chemtrailssuck
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Worst job is cashier- at walmart! Or maybe bus driver, but cashier pays the worst.

Jurist
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Jurist

Whoops, I forgot to add utilities to my above calculations. Add another $150 per month for gas, electricity, and water. That’s another $1800 per year before taxes, or an extra $1.75 per hour before taxes that the person must make.
Re-totaled wage requirements for a person to live in a safe neighborhood but not enjoy a single luxury:
$16.75 to $19.75 per hour, full time. On a high school diploma.

truckjunkie
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truckjunkie

There ya go-try THAT on $1050.00 per Month,then try getting work with a liveable wage when you’re 62 years along. Even my knowledge of the Tire service industry is worthless these days;Tire shops don’t WANT their kids (Yeah-they average 18-30 years old.) to know how to do things RIGHT-they want them to do things FAST,and quality matters not a bit.

truckjunkie
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truckjunkie

I’d be GLAD to give ’em a break-just as soon as they can show they have brains and common sense……

chemtrailssuck
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They don’t teach that in public schools…. 😉

Lophatt
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Lophatt

I suppose that its good that some of them may be reevaluating their future. I can attest to the fact that where I am in life now is not where I thought I’d be back when. In my generation the thought was that, if you worked hard, you could retire at a reasonable age and enjoy the rest of your life. I’ve retired twice now. If there’s a lesson in that I’d say that its never trust the advertising. While I could clearly see the changes that resulted in workers being worse off then their parents, nobody seemed to want… Read more »

Jurist
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Jurist

Well said!

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chemtrailssuck
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As Eric Blair (George Orwell) once said, “Every generation imagines itself to be more intelligent than the one that went before it, and wiser than the one that comes after it.” This is all planned by the Wreck a fellow Global Company. They are the reason this is happening. Wages are not what they once were. In the 70’s even, my DH said that his neighbor worked at Kroeger’s in the bakery department and made 28 bucks an hour! And this was in the 70’s!! Manufacturing was destroyed thanks to Rockefellers and their ilk. Think ‘Global trade’, NAFTA and all… Read more »