Gaystapo corporate intimidation at JP Morgan Chase

Gaystapo
Remember my post of 2½ months ago, on Chase Bank, in a company survey, asking its employees to declare their loyalty to LGBT? (LGBT = lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender)
Each year, JP Morgan Chase sends its employees a survey asking questions related to management and other non-controversial issues. The survey this year included, for the first time, a question asking if the employee is “An ally of the LGBT community, but not personally identifying as LGBT.”
That question is understood by some employees to be a veiled threat because the survey is not anonymous.
Here’s a follow-up that chillingly fleshes out what that survey means. Although the account below does not specifically name JP Morgan Chase, the similarities are too striking to be otherwise.
Rod Dreher writes for The American Conservative, Sept. 9, 2014, that he received a long e-mail from a reader “who works in management at a major corporation.” The email detailed “how the bureaucracy in his company is collecting more and more data on its employees at the same time it’s tightening the screws on the internal culture of diversity,” and that “traditional Christians are going deep into the closet there.”
Dreher then quotes from the reader’s email:

If you don’t sign up to be a member of the LGBT “ally” group, they notice—especially if you are (or are potentially going to be) a manager. LGBT employees need to be supported by their manager. The manager is the front line with such questions as “I need to have off next Friday because my partner is having surgery” or “do my partner and I qualify for corporate adoption benefits?” If you’re in a same-sex relationship and you don’t know if your manager is an ally, this is a very scary conversation to have. People want to know it’s safe to confide in their manager without fear of being judged.

The company needs to know which managers can be trusted to this end and which can’t. No matter how openly supportive you may be of LGBT employees, the company wants to track who identifies as an “ally” openly, and who doesn’t. If they don’t count allies and non-allies, they won’t be able to prove things are “improving” nor will they be able to target managers for further inclusion coaching. So, by making it “safer” for some employee demographics to be open about their personal lives, they’re inadvertently closeting others.

[…] The end game is as Big Brotherish […] People need to be made aware of what’s coming. 

Dreher comments that “It doesn’t take a paranoid to see where this is going. It just takes someone who has worked for a corporation, and who has seen how powerful the phrase ‘hostile work environment’ can be.”
Dreher concludes that he doesn’t think what the “major corporation” (cough, cough, Chase Bank) is doing is “persecution” of Christians, but that “it is something. And it is real.”
The Oxford Dictionary defines “persecution” as:

  1. Hostility and ill-treatment, especially because of race or political or religious beliefs
  2. Persistent annoyance or harassment

I’m not as decorous as Dreher, and I call “PERSECUTION” what this “major corporation” (JP Morgan Chase) is doing to its employees who decline to openly declare their “loyalty” to LGBT.
H/t California Catholic Daily
See also:

~Eowyn

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0 responses to “Gaystapo corporate intimidation at JP Morgan Chase

  1. Advancement of the most politically-correct, just like in the Soviet system.

     
  2. Diversity….
    “You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means.”

     
  3. Sue the bastards… It is the only thing they understand!

     
  4. Did anyone expect any less of a corporation based off morgan, who was a bankster back in the day, whose actions are the sole cause of ruination of Nickola Tesla? The corp was satanic back then, it is just as satanic now. Here’s hoping folks will figure this out and just plain not work for the filthy thing.

     
  5. Thank you Dr. Eowyn for this interesting post. If I worked for them, I’d file a complaint with the Equal Rights Commission for discrimination and persecution of my right to my religious beliefs. I’d make life very hard for them by thoroughly litigating such bigotry.

     

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