Father’s Day 2019: 1 in 4 U.S. children live in fatherless homes

Today is Father’s Day.

Happy Father’s Day to all the men who are real dads instead of mere sperm-donors!

For more on the read dads, see the Pew Research Center’s “8 facts about American dads“.

But shame on the mere sperm-donors.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, in 2017, 19.7 million children, more than 1 in 4, live without a father in the home. As fathers.com puts it: “If it were classified as a disease, fatherlessness would be an epidemic worthy of attention as a national emergency.”

The sperm-donors, by their absence in their children’s lives, are responsible for a whole host of their children’s problems and social ills.

In 2013, the worst states are:

  • Mississippi, where 36.2% of children lived in fatherless homes.
  • Louisiana: 34.4%
  • Alabama: 30.7%

Not coincidentally, blacks make up large percentages of the population in those states:

That this is not a coincidence is confirmed by 2012 U.S. Census Bureau statistics:

  • More than half (57.6%) of America’s black children lived absent their biological fathers.
  • 31.2% of Hispanic children and 20.7% of white children lived in fatherless homes.

Just as #BlackLivesMatter are silent on the vast numbers of black babies being aborted and the black-on-black homicides in cities like Chicago and Detroit, they are silent on the epidemic of black men abandoning their children. Instead, #BlackLivesMatter blame whities for blacks’ social ills, and vocal spokesmen like Colin Kaepernick and Spike Lee make showy, grandstanding virtue-signaling.

~Eowyn

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Alma
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Alma

How lucky all that have a Dad. Although He+ is not here I feel my Papa’s presence- He was wisdom, love, caring, strict and a gentleman. Hope we can join Him some place, some time. May all the Dads subscribing to FOTM have a lovely Father’s Day.

William
Member
William

Indeed, shame on the sperm donors who have allowed themselves to be defined almost out of existence. When white men are depicted at all now it is as bumbling inept drones, if they have any purpose at all it is to impregnate women and then disappear. Fatherhood is an anachronism, irrelevant. It’s all women and negroes now, all the time. A drug advert: I asked my doctor and SHE said…We have bring your daughter to work day; forget bringing your son to work dad, he’s been diagnosed with Toxic Masculinity and is too heavily medicated. From my experience kids raised… Read more »

Auntie Lulu
Guest
Auntie Lulu

William . . . . Thank you for sharing with us. I think many of us had fathers who were a mixture of “country bumpkin and scholar.” One thing my Father did for us kids is that we saw him read the newspaper from cover to cover (except for the sports page or Dear Abby.) Among his children, three of us are avid seekers of the truth regarding political matters, and I attribute that to the fact that Dad always knew what was going on politically. God Bless my dear Father.

Freeland_Dave
Guest
Freeland_Dave

While I agree in pat an equal part of the shame belongs to the sperm downer recipient. In the biology class I passed in school I learned it takes a male and a female to create an offspring.

Lophatt
Member
Lophatt

My dad was great. Ultimately I ended up being mostly raised by my father. He had twelve brothers and sisters. One of my aunts lost her husband to a sudden, unexpected heart attack right after her second son was born. My dad stepped in and all through their growing years provided a male figure for them. My youngest grandchildren, six and three, have parents who work weird hours so I take them to Mass every Sunday. It isn’t lost on me how few men I see with children. It’s sad really. When I was little my dad and I had… Read more »

William
Member
William

They sure do, and kudos to you for seeing that your grandkids are churched. My father always brought us to Mass and of course we wore suit jackets and ties. He always tied my tie; I still can’t do it so I keep one tied in case I have to go to a funeral:) My mother had been married and divorced so she was kind of a non-person to the Catholic Church, so she didn’t go with us. She preferred Lutheran. My father was very comfortable with the priests, he spoke Latin and French as well as German. They would… Read more »

Lophatt
Member
Lophatt

Sorry your time with him was cut short. Mine only lived to be 65, died of a heart attack. I remember going with him occasionally to bring donations from his employer to the home for unwed mothers. We’d visit with the sisters and it was an eye opener.

I was raised Protestant and my mother wouldn’t allow him to take me to Mass. Two or three times a year he’d sneak me there. Later, in my thirties, I converted.

Nobody’s ever going to convince me that dad’s aren’t important.

Auntie Lulu
Guest
Auntie Lulu

Most of us who had a Dad in the home are or were lucky. I grieve for these poor children who are born to women who disrespect themselves, and the lives of their unborn, by virtue of the fact that they participate in bringing children into their lives when there will be no father there to help raise these children. It is true that particularly in the black community, these young people have been sold a bill of goods. They think that putting one over on whitey and collecting a welfare check pays the white community back for the ills… Read more »

cwgf
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cwgf

This is why they want government to be their daddy.

Freeland_Dave
Guest
Freeland_Dave

Pertaining to ‘virtue signaling’ who makes that decision? When it comes to virtue none of us are truly virtuous as, according to the Word of God, “All have sinned,” the act of a non-virtuous person, “and come short of the glory of God.”

So you may understand why I am asking who makes that determination.

Jackie Puppet
Member

I also wish women who take on the role of “dad”, a Happy Father’s Day as well.

My daughter once wished me a Happy Mother’s Day cause she said I was more of a mom than her mom was.

By that same token, I rent a house (separate units) with 3 Mexican females, and the mom is about my age – “dad” walked out a long while back. Her oldest daughter, works full-time, and has a side job as well, is the breadwinner of their family.

GRIZZ
Guest
GRIZZ

Thanks for standing in the gap,Gramps GRIZZ.
My shortcomings are not your fault.
My greatest respect to the MEN,that raised their children.
Happy Fathers Day MEN!!!!

Lophatt
Member
Lophatt

If you ask me its all about expectations. “Creating” a child is the easy part. It’s after you’ve done that that it gets interesting. Mainly it is a matter of putting someone you are completely responsible for ahead of yourself. In these days of social engineered change it is important for them to remove any expectations. Even in the black community, especially in the South, the expectation was that children would be raised with two parents. With the move North, away from their native churches and that influence, things took a turn for the worse. Now, with the leftists hyping… Read more »

Auntie Lulu
Guest
Auntie Lulu

Lophatt . . . Thank you for that wonderful dissertation on exactly what got us to where we are today. I certainly do agree, “it is almost impossible to live a quality life without the input of both a Father and a Mother.”

Anonymous
Guest
Anonymous

Thanks. liberals!!

CalGirl
Guest
CalGirl

I owe all that I am as a productive and caring adult to my adoptive Father, my maternal GrandDad (and, his mother, my Great-grandmother). Mom was talented & had many attributes, but suffered depression and prescription drug abuse my entire life with her, which was most sad in my growing up years. She was unable, but these stalwart pillars of my life kept me buoyed/afloat and mentally healthy, with my eyes on a productive future for myself. Meanwhile, they also remained supportive of my mother until, in her later years, she finally overcame many of her demons. Through her last… Read more »

Auntie Lulu
Guest
Auntie Lulu

CalGirl . . . . Thank you so much for sharing the insights of your childhood. Even people who are not our “blood relatives” can often make all the difference in the world.

Watertender
Member
Watertender

My father was an 8th grade dropout that could fix anything. He worked construction for over 50 years and taught many graduate engineers how to make things work. He had his demons and we had a strained relationship at times but he was hard working and honest. When he drank he was a mean drunk but gave it up in his mid 40’s. By that time I was working the engine rooms and boiler rooms of ships and towboats. We were ok with each other but never really close. He always covered for my mother and brother who were drug… Read more »

CalGirl
Guest
CalGirl

Thank you for your Father’s Day story, Water. I was enriched in reading it and see your story in mine, too. Thanks again for sharing on Father’s Day. Sometimes I think I “overshare” on this site, but then, when others do, too, I feel like a part of a community that is unashamed to share backgrounds, situations, feelings, our own humanity…..all to the betterment of our own futures/future decison-making, life-lessons/practices, etc. Thanks again.

Watertender
Member
Watertender

CalGirl I think you and I could compare notes on a lot of things. So many play the victim card and refuse to see the real problem. You are ultimately the master of your own destiny and have to learn to deal with difficulties in life..

I live by these 5 rules.

Nobody ever said life is easy..
Nobody ever said life is fair…
Nobody gets out alive…
Someday is Today…. and..
Life is not a dress rehearsal….

William
Member
William

An 8th grade dropout who could fix anything.. such are the people who make the world run right. I freely confess envy for the nuts and bolts knowledge that you acquired from your father. My father for all intents and purposes lived in the 19th century, he could build rock walls without mortar and take down tress with a two-man crosscut saw but he was mystified by a ball point pen. He was always lost in books, a natural academic, and he passed that on to me. So I’m trained in psychotherapy/psychopathology but going forward for practical purposes,as I said… Read more »

Alexandra
Guest
Alexandra

My husband and I are divorced, sadly…not my choice. Please pray that we will reconcile. Our son misses his dad. Fortunately he sees his dad a lot, as his dad watches him while I work. But he needs a full-time father, not just part-time.

Auntie Lulu
Guest
Auntie Lulu

Alexandra . . . Truly my heart goes out to you in this sad situation. I will gladly pray that either you are reconciled with your husband, or that the Lord imparts to you an acceptance of the situation, and an even better replacement for a Father figure in your son’s life is provided. God Bless you, I know the road you are walking is a weary and terrifying one.

CalGirl
Guest
CalGirl

Blessings dear Alexandra, on you and your son. I will pray that your life goes where God will lead you and that you and your son will traverse your days well and safely.