Father punished for ‘old school’ discipline

messed up

The Garden Island: A Kilauea (Hawaii) man was given probation and a fine Wednesday in 5th Circuit Court for punishing his son by making him walk a mile for not answering his questionsa form of discipline a judge called “old school” and no longer appropriate.

Robert Demond was sentenced to a one-year probation, a $200 fine and to a child parenting class for a misdemeanor charge of second-degree endangering the welfare of a minor.

Demond said he would handle it differently now after going through Family Court, where the case originated on Oct. 17, 2013, and to Circuit Court, where he pleaded no contest to the misdemeanor charge.

Demond told the judge that it was a common form of punishment when he was a kid and that he didn’t see it as morally wrong or criminal. He had picked his son up from school and questioned him about a matter that came to his attention. When his son didn’t respond, he stopped the vehicle and made him walk home to think about his actions.

“How far did you make him walk?” asked Judge Kathleen Watanabe. “About a mile,” Demond said.

These are different times, Watanabe said. It is understandable that you became upset with your son, but it is dangerous for children to walk along the highway, and there are predators out there, she said. The age of the child was not revealed in the course of the hearing (the child was 7 or 8 from what I can tell on the internet) and the Office of the Prosecuting Attorney would not divulge further information.

Defense attorney Margaret Hanson said that Demond has no criminal history and presents no risk to the community. The offense was basically a form of punishment that is no longer considered acceptable by the community.

County Deputy Prosecuting Attorney Gary Nelson said the discipline was not an appropriate way for Demond to correct his son’s behavior. Yet, it was clear that the defendant acted with the intent to teach his child a lesson and did not act out of anger.

The state recommended a child parenting course and supports the defendant’s motion for a deferred acceptance of his no contest plea. It allows him to motion the court to expunge the charge from his record after completing his probation. Watanabe granted the motion.

DCG

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0 responses to “Father punished for ‘old school’ discipline

  1. Reblogged this on Dead Citizen's Rights Society.

     
  2. Sadly, a neighbor saw the little boy walking and picked him up to take him home. She called the police instead of speaking with the father first.
    The father wasn’t physically abusing the child, which is common there

     
  3. Hey ‘judge’ – if there is such a problem with child predators out there, MAYBE you should do something about THEM.

     
  4. Whoa! He made his disrespectful kid walk home…what a brute! Of course with obesity rates as high as they are with children today…maybe walking home isn’t such a bad idea. I think the dad probably should have watched him walk home for his kid’s safety especially when the neighbor showed up, hindsight is always 20/20. Dad would’ve been able to wave her away and the police wouldn’t have been called. To get the courts involved because his kid walked home is a bit much. And this is in his permanent record. Now, the courts get to teach dad how to raise his child in the proper and “enlightened” way. And what did his son learn? That he doesn’t have to respect dad and he is the victim and has the power to get dad in trouble if and when he wants to. Dad could always have his son take the school bus.

     
  5. THIS IS THE PART THAT SCARES me “The offense was basically a form of punishment that is no longer considered acceptable by the…. community.”

    HAWAII’S people voted by more then 87% NO ON GAY MARRIAGE. THAT TELLS ME! “that gay marriage is no longer considered acceptable by the community.”

     
  6. The dad made a mistake. He should have sued the boy in court and let the court decide!

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