Every Cloud Has a Silver Lining?

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This story just has “ICK-factor” written all over it.  Nothing like predicting profits from the disaster of others. ~LTG

Japan’s disaster recovery expected to boost U.S. exports

Published 4 August 2011
America’s western sea ports and industries like timber and oil are expected to see an increase in activity as Japan’s reconstruction efforts swing into full gear; the natural disaster leveled large portions of Japan and to rebuild the country will need to import record amounts of logs, timber, and plywood

Japan’s rebuilding will mean increased lumber shipments // Source: cdc.gov

America’s western sea ports and industries like timber and oil are expected to see an increase in activity as Japan’s reconstruction efforts swing into full gear.
Ports in Washington as well as Vancouver, Canada are expected to load more timber onto vessels bound for Japan as it recovers from the $220 billion in damages that the 11 March 9.0 magnitude earthquake and tsunami caused.
According to Wood Resources International LLC., a forest-industry consulting firm, the natural disaster leveled large portions of Japan and to rebuild the country will need to import record amounts of logs, timber, and plywood.
In particular U.S. timber companies like Weyerhaeuser Co. and Rayonier Inc. are expected to see an increase in orders from Japan, a welcome trend as the U.S. housing market has continued to flounder under the weight of the recession.
“Demand will start to pick up in the second half and it will probably last for a year or two,” said Hakan Ekstrom, the president of Wood Resources International. “Weyerhaeuser, since they are a huge company and they have long, long relations with Japanese companies, will benefit.”
Weyerhaeuser is expected to benefit the most from Japanese orders compared to other U.S. logging companies as it exports Douglas fir, the type of timber used by Japanese homebuilders  Full Story Here.
~LTG

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0 responses to “Every Cloud Has a Silver Lining?

  1. Not buying Japanese goods (sorry, Japan) unless I go over them with a geiger counter.

     
  2. lowtechgrannie

    I doubt Japan is exporting very much these days. They’re too busy coping with the aftermath of catastrophe on their own shore.

     

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