Eucharist and Thundersnow

It was a quiet snowy Sunday morning.

As people filtered into our little Episcopal chapel, the whole world looked like a scene from Currier and Ives. It was the mid 1970s, but it looked like we had been transported into the 19th century. Colors were muted, passing vehicle noises were muffled by soft falling snow. There was no wind, and the temperature was not cold, around 32 degrees.

Color began as we stepped out of our soft gray outdoor world into the church lobby bathed in colored light from stained glass windows, and more color was added by the rich beautiful priestly vestments for the Communion service.

Being a Sacramental congregation (high church Episcopal) and on friendly terms with Charismatics, Evangelicals and Pentecostals, our understanding of the nature of the Communion elements was a subject of discussion and friendly debate.

Were the Communion elements Transubstantiation, Consubstantiation, or Symbolic Remembrance? There were a lot of discussions on this subject in the weeks leading up to this Sunday morning. I was puzzled. I think most were, except those who hold to their argued positions like good soldiers (whether or not they were right).

The liturgy began, and we enjoyed stirring hymns and words from the Book of Common Prayer.

We proceeded on to the the Eucharist, the reason for the Sunday worship in a Sacramental congregation.

I don’t remember if it happened when the priest said “This is my body” or when he said “This is my blood.” It was one of the two statements. At that moment, on a quiet, windless muffled snowy morning, the silence was shattered!

BOOM!!! Rumble Rumble Rumble Rumble Rumble… 

In stunned silence we proceed to the Communion rail, and kneeling down, received the Body and the Blood of the Lord Jesus Christ. 

The service drew to a close, and we all exchanged greetings and love, smiles and laughter, as we filtered out again into the soft, quiet snowy morning.

This is my body. This is my blood. 

Let God be true, and every man a liar. 

~ TD

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Dr. Eowyn
Admin
1 year ago

There are accounts of Eucharistic miracles — of the host turning into human tissue or blood. One such site is Lanciano, Italy, which FOTM‘s Joan and I visited some years ago.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Miracle_of_Lanciano

Dr. Eowyn
Admin
1 year ago
Reply to  TrailDust

“The Lord shut my mouth that morning.”

?

Kept in a glass cabinet in the Chapel of San Francesco (St. Francis) in Lanciano is a very old-looking, brownish piece of tissue, said to be human heart tissue.

Lophatt
Lophatt
1 year ago
Reply to  Dr. Eowyn

Amen. I have no doubt. This is a very real obstacle to reunification. Properly understood it shouldn’t be. We just had a reading Sunday that deals with this. What was Christ doing on the shore? How did He identify Himself? I used to teach an adult class in sacramental theology. For me what was important to remember about the Eucharist and Mass in general, was that it occurs in Kairos, not in Chronos time. So every Mass is THE Mass. It isn’t a “reenactment”. When we did ecumenical retreats I would always listen to the discussions between the Catholic priests… Read more »

Lophatt
Lophatt
1 year ago
Reply to  TrailDust

That’s exactly as I see it. It is comforting to me as well. “John” writes in Kairos. To be more accurate, the “School of John”.

God sees everything as “the eternal now”. This is the source of much human discomfort. We see “eternity” as encapsulated in our lives. We are but a spark in time.

When I receive I truly feel the presence of the whole Communion of Saints and Christ at its head. What an honor. Having this in our lives makes most other things pale by comparison.

pigpen51
pigpen51
1 year ago

My son is a Navy sailor. He signed up for a 6 year enlistment, since his job required 2 years of training. His ship was due to leave the 1st of April, and he was due to get out in the middle of April. He has a wife and a 7 year old daughter, but he extended his term by 6 months in order to not leave his ship with a new person on a job which can be difficult at times. He is a sonar tech, the one who fixes the sonar equipment if it fails. He saved the… Read more »

Steven Broiles
1 year ago

I am a Catholic, and I know I am a poor excuse for one, but I believe in the Real Presence in the Eucharist. I believe that transubstantiation occurs when validly performed by a Catholic priest. Three things are needed for transubstantiation to occur: First, the proper “elements” must be used—unleavened bread and real wine. Second, the priest must use the right wording as prescribed by the Church. Third, the priest must have the intention that Christ Had when He performed this miracle for the first time at the Last Supper. There has been much argument back and forth regarding… Read more »

Alma
Alma
1 year ago

All elements must be in conjunction for the Holy Spirit tu manifest itself in the most amazing ways, are we able to to know it?