Category Archives: Donald Trump

Michael Flynn cleared by FBI of illicit ties to Russia

This news is from January 2017, but I don’t remember seeing or hearing about this. Do you?

Grr . . . .

Lt. Gen. (ret.) Michael Flynn

On January 24, 2017, Joe Tacopino reports for the New York Post:

The FBI has reviewed intercepted phone calls between national security adviser Michael Flynn and the Russian ambassador to the US and has found no evidence of wrongdoing, it was revealed Monday.

The calls were made in late December and picked up as part of routine electronic surveillance of Russian officials. They did not reveal any illicit ties between Flynn and Russia, according to the Washington Post.

The review of the calls was part of a wider probe into Russia’s interference in the presidential election and hacking of the Democratic National Committee.

See also:

~Eowyn

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Of course: Hillary Clinton compares herself to Wonder Woman

At some Hollyweird event where the seals applauded and cheered.

DCG

TV Producers Discuss Ripple Effects of “Traumatic” Trump Election

GIF-Giraffe-eating-Popcorn

Gonna be a loooooooong four years for libtards.

From Hollywood Reporter:  It was only fitting that the Television in a Trumped Up America panel Friday at the ATX Festival started out with a reading of the President’s latest tweet, centered on former FBI director James Comey’s testimony Thursday.

TV writer-producers including Liz Tigelaar (Casual), Javier Grillo-Marxuach (The Middleman), Paul Garnes (Queen Sugar), Michael Rauch (Royal Pains), Julie Plec (The Vampire Diaries) and Beau Willimon (House of Cards), gathered to dive deep into the impact of the presidential election, and specifically Donald Trump’s rise from Celebrity Apprentice host to the 45th President of the United States (as if Trump didn’t absolutely nothing else in his life).

Looking back on Nov. 8th, Plec recalled the ” absolute horror and depression” felt in her writers’ room the day after, while Tigelaar remembered that “we didn’t know whether to cancel the room, we didn’t know whether to keep working” at Hulu’s Casual, which was early into breaking its third season.

It ultimately found it’s [sic] way into the scripts. “We all had this call to action,” she said. “We were at this point of still being able to decide our season arcs and it definitely impacted our younger character, Laura’s story, on the show. We decided with her we were going to go a more political route. … We were able to create this different backdrop for her story that I don’t think would have occurred to us to do.”

On Underground, Garnes discussed how the election inspired co-creator Misha Green’s writing of one of the final episodes of the WGN America’s second season, despite the fact that it centered on Harriet Tubman and took place more than a century ago. “The election influenced Misha’s tone in that monologue. It ended with this amazing call to action almost directed to the audience: ‘Are you a citizen or a soldier?‘” he said.

Plec said the election influenced her outlook on feminist issues, and even caused her to break up a central romance on one of her series because the male character had beaten up the female character. “We all decided on that day, those two can’t be together anymore and we killed the love story that day,” she said of the script, which came in the day after the election. “That’s a really weird feeling to know that narratively you’ve been going down this path but your conscious can’t advocate that kind of violence and lean into that.”

That push towards more feminist-friendly storytelling was also felt by Tigelaar in terms of the projects she’s looking to develop. “What I’ve been attracted to lately is about women who are refusing to play the game and put themselves in a box,” she said.

Willimon, now working on the Hulu space drama The First, said the impact of the election reaches far beyond just political storylines. “We’re hyper-aware,” he said. “There are political implications to every story choice you make.”

While Trump’s presidency, and the many issues that have stemmed from his time in office thus far, has greatly impacted television writing, the producers discussed the difficulty in finding a way to stay informed with the news cycle while also getting work done. “There’s a lot of stress-eating involved,” Grillo-Marxuach said. “More than anything else, the torrent of news and information is more about the stuff you do to mitigate your stress.”

Willimon, who returned to the political roots from his earlier days in the immediate aftermath of the election, admitted it was tough to return to TV writing. “For the first couple months after the election, it was really hard to focus on anything else it felt as thought [sic] the whole country had been slapped across the face by a two-by-four,” he said. “It’s become a negotiation to balance one’s time between what you’re able to do as an artist creatively in terms of holding a mirror up to society reflecting.”

“That’s a new reality for people that want to be involved. It’s been an interesting balance to strike,” he continued. “But the resistance is strong. We’re seeing that everyday and I maintain hope.”

Willimon’s new series is set 15-20 years in the future, which has made him contemplate the long-term impact of the Trump presidency. “You have to speculate and imagine what the world will look like 20 years from now on, prior to November 8, 2016, what the world looked like was a lot different,” he said. “Whether you support Trump or not… it’s still a traumatic event for the country one way or another in terms of the schism and the divisiveness and the polarization and we will be contending with those consequences and ripple effects for decades to come.”

DCG

James Comey: ‘I’ve had a lot of conversations with humans’

Yesterday, during his appearance before the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, former FBI Director James Comey was grilled by a very confusing-sounding Sen. John McCain (R-AZ) on what McCain called Comey’s “double standard” — in the FBI ending its investigation of Hillary Clinton’s private unsecure email server vs. the agency’s ongoing investigation of Donald Trump’s connections, if any, with Russia.

Beginning at the 6:04 mark of the video clip above, McCain and Comey had a rather incoherent exchange:

McCain: “Then when the President said to you you talked about the April 11th phone call and he said, ‘Because I’ve been very loyal to you, very loyal, we had that thing, you know.’ Did that arouse your curiosity as to what ‘that thing’ was?”

Comey: “Yes.”

McCain: “Why didn’t you ask him.”

Comey: “It didn’t seem to me to be important for the conversation we were having to understand it. I took it to some, um, effort to, to, erh, communicate to me that there is a relationship between us, where I’ve been good to you, you should be good to me.”

McCain: “Yea, but I think it would intensely arouse my curiosity if the President of the United States said we had that thing, you know. I’d like to know what the hell that thing is, particularly if I’m the director of the FBI.”

Comey: “Yeah, I get that, senator. Honestly, I’ll tell you what, this is speculation, but what I concluded at the time is in his [Trump’s] memory, he was searching back to our encounter at the dinner and was preparing himself to say ‘I offer loyalty to you, you promise loyalty to me,’ and all of a sudden, his memory showed him that did not happen, and I think he pulled up short. That’s just a guess. But I, I’ve had a lot of conversations with humans over the years.

Now why would Comey say that?

“I’ve had a lot of conversations with humans over the years” implies that Comey also had conversations with non-humans.

Like this?

A reptilian Secret Service agent at the 2012 AIPAC conference

Or McCain? LOL

I took the above 2 screenshots from a video of an interview McCain did with Larry King some time during the Obama administration.

See also:

H/t FOTM‘s bongiornoc

~Eowyn

No ‘gotcha Trump’ bombshells in former FBI director Comey’s statement to Senate Committee

This afternoon, former FBI Director James Comey released his prepared statement ahead of his much-anticipated appearance tomorrow before the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence.

His 7-page “Statement for the Record – Senate Select Committee on Intelligence – June 8, 2017” can be read here.

Comey’s statement is sure to disappoint those on the Left who have been salivating, having convinced themselves that the statement would be a “gotcha” on President Trump.

As summarized by ZeroHedge, the key highlights of Comey’s statement include:

(1) As President Trump has said, Comey had assured him he is not personally under investigation by the FBI:

“…prior to the January 6 meeting, I discussed with the FBI’s leadership team whether I should be prepared to assure President-Elect Trump that we were not investigating him personally. That was true; we did not have an open counter-intelligence case on him. We agreed I should do so if circumstances warranted. During our one-on-one meeting at Trump Tower, based on President-Elect Trump’s reaction to the briefing and without him directly asking the question, I offered that assurance.”

In fact, Comey cautioned Trump not to request the FBI to investigate the totally untrue “Russian hooker dossier” that former British spy Chris Steele had concocted on Trump, for the express reason that such an investigation would “create a narrative” that the FBI was investigating Trump personally:

“The President and I had dinner on Friday, January 27 at 6:30 pm in the Green Room at the White House…. During the dinner, the President returned to the salacious material I had briefed him about on January 6, and, as he had done previously, expressed his disgust for the allegations and strongly denied them. He said he was considering ordering me to investigate the alleged incident to prove it didn’t happen. I replied that he should give that careful thought because it might create a narrative that we were investigating him personally, which we weren’t, and because it was very difficult to prove a negative. He said he would think about it and asked me to think about it.”

(2) Comey documented his conversations with Trump in memos, which he did not do with Obama:

“I felt compelled to document my first conversation with the President-Elect in a memo. To ensure accuracy, I began to type it on a laptop in an FBI vehicle outside Trump Tower the moment I walked out of the meeting. Creating written records immediately after one-on-one conversations with Mr. Trump was my practice from that point forward. This had not been my practice in the past…. As was my practice for conversations with President Trump, I wrote a detailed memo about the dinner immediately afterwards and shared it with the senior leadership team of the FBI….

I spoke alone with President Obama twice in person (and never on the phone) – once in 2015 to discuss law enforcement policy issues and a second time, briefly, for him to say goodbye in late 2016. In neither of those circumstances did I memorialize the discussions. I can recall nine one-on-one conversations with President Trump in four months – three in person and six on the phone.”

(3) On Mike Flynn:

“On February 14, I went to the Oval Office for a scheduled counter- terrorism briefing of the President.

When the door by the grandfather clock closed, and we were alone, the President began by saying, ‘I want to talk about Mike Flynn.’ Flynn had resigned the previous day. The President began by saying Flynn hadn’t done anything wrong in speaking with the Russians, but he had to let him go because he had misled the Vice President. He added that he had other concerns about Flynn, which he did not then specify.

The President then returned to the topic of Mike Flynn, saying, ”He is a good guy and has been through a lot.’ He repeated that Flynn hadn’t done anything wrong on his calls with the Russians, but had misled the Vice President. He then said, ‘I hope you can see your way clear to letting this go, to letting Flynn go. He is a good guy. I hope you can let this go.’ I replied only that ‘he is a good guy.’ (In fact, I had a positive experience dealing with Mike Flynn when he was a colleague as Director of the Defense Intelligence Agency at the beginning of my term at FBI.) I did not say I would ‘let this go.’

The President then returned briefly to the problem of leaks. I then got up and left out the door by the grandfather clock, making my way through the large group of people waiting there, including Mr. Priebus and the Vice President.

I immediately prepared an unclassified memo of the conversation about Flynn and discussed the matter with senior FBI leadership.”

(4) On loyalty:

“The President and I had dinner on Friday, January 27 at 6:30 pm in the Green Room at the White House…. I added that I was not ‘reliable’ in the way politicians use that word, but he could always count on me to tell him the truth. I added that I was not on anybody’s side politically and could not be counted on in the traditional political sense, a stance I said was in his best interest as the President.

A few moments later, the President said, ‘I need loyalty, I expect loyalty.’ I didn’t move, speak, or change my facial expression in any way during the awkward silence that followed. We simply looked at each other in silence. The conversation then moved on, but he returned to the subject near the end of our dinner.

At one point, I explained why it was so important that the FBI and the Department of Justice be independent of the White House. I said it was a paradox: Throughout history, some Presidents have
decided that because ‘problems’ come from [Department of] Justice, they should try to hold the Department close. But blurring those boundaries ultimately makes the problems worse by undermining public trust in the institutions and their work.
Near the end of our dinner, the President returned to the subject of my job, saying he was very glad I wanted to stay, adding that he had heard great things about me from Jim Mattis, Jeff Sessions, and many others. He then said, ‘I need loyalty.’ I replied, ‘You will always get honesty from me.’ He paused and then said, ‘That’s what I want, honest loyalty.’ I paused, and then said, ‘You will get that from me.’ As I wrote in the memo I created immediately after the dinner, it is possible we understood the phrase ‘honest loyalty’  differently, but I decided it wouldn’t be productive to push it further. The term – honest loyalty – had helped end a very awkward conversation and my explanations had made clear what he should expect.”

(5) The “cloud” and the last conversation:

“On the morning of March 30, the President called me at the FBI. He described the Russia investigation as ‘a cloud’ that was impairing his ability to act on behalf of the country. He said he had nothing to do with Russia, had not been involved with hookers in Russia, and had always assumed he was being recorded when in Russia. He asked what we could do to ‘lift the cloud.’ I responded that we were investigating the matter as quickly as we could, and that there would be great benefit, if we didn’t find anything, to our having done the work well. He agreed, but then re-emphasized the problems this was causing him….

On the morning of April 11, the President called me and asked what I had done about his request that I ‘get out’ that he is not personally under investigation. I replied that I had passed his request to the Acting Deputy Attorney General, but I had not heard back. He replied that ‘the cloud’ was getting in the way of his ability to do his job. He said that perhaps he would have his people reach out to the Acting Deputy Attorney General. I said that was the way his request should be handled. I said the White House Counsel should contact the leadership of DOJ to make the request, which was the traditional channel.

He said he would do that and added, ‘Because I have been very loyal to you, very loyal; we had that thing you know.’ I did not reply or ask him what he meant by ‘that thing.’ I said only that the way to handle it was to have the White House Counsel call the Acting Deputy Attorney General. He said that was what he would do and the call ended.

That was the last time I spoke with President Trump.”

From the above, President Trump clearly was disturbed that Comey and the FBI had not made clear to the media that Trump is not being personally investigated for Russia or hookers or anything — which he isn’t. That might have impressed Trump as Comey’s lack of “loyalty”.

In the last analysis, it is the President who appoints and nominates the FBI Director, and it is the President who has the prerogative to fire his FBI Director.

~Eowyn

Fake News: CNN Becky Anderson stages fake Muslim ‘peace protest’ in London

Journalists are supposed to report, not make up, news.

Yesterday morning (June 4, 2017), UK independent journalist Mark @markantro tweeted a video he took of CNN staging a phony demonstration of a Muslim peace group in London. He writes:

CNN creating the narrative

Note the white police officers leaving before the CNN shot & the Asian officers coming in. They then left after they went off air!

The video shows CNN journalist Becky Anderson staging the street theater. See her giving directions to police (or crisis actors) in yellow jackets, and a group of Muslims (a child, men, and women in head scarves), as each lays down flowers to terrorist victims and holds up professionally-printed #TurnToLove #ForLondon signs.

Here’s a GIF of Anderson giving directions, in case YouTube takes down the video:

Anderson then proceeded to report the fake protest she’d just staged as real news. Here’s her tweet:

CNN Anderson’s fake news is being disseminated as real news by other media.

BBC reported it as real news. Scotsman Donald @DonOftheDead tweets:

AP journalist Raphael Satter also reported CNN Anderson’s fakery as real news by posting to his Twitter account a picture of the staged photo-op.

CNN is a habitual purveyor of fake news. See:

See also:

H/t Will Shanley and Gateway Pundit

~Eowyn

Democrats wish Hillary would shut up

Even Democrats can’t stand her.

Amie Parnes reports for The Hill, June 4, 2017, that more than a dozen Democrats, including even staunch Hillary Clinton supporters and her former aides, who were interviewed by The Hill, all say they’d like Hillary to take a cue from Obama and step out of the spotlight.

They say her string of public remarks blaming her loss in November on any and all but herself — especially those blaming the Democratic National Committee (DNC) for her defeat which many took as an indirect criticism of Obama — are hurting the party and making Hillary look bitter.

Although many empathized with Hillary’s anger over former Director James Comey’s handling of the FBI’s probe into her (illegal) private email server, the Democrats unanimously said Hillary needs to rethink her blaming tour, including the recent Recode conference in California on June 1, 2017, in which she complained she had inherited nothing from a “bankrupt” Democratic Party led by Obama for eight years.

The Democrats who wish Hillary would shut up include:

  1. Democratic strategist Brad Bannon, who said this about Hillary: “I’m not sure there is a political strategy here. It sounds to me like more of a personal strategy. Complaining about an outcome and blaming everyone else is not a good political strategy.”
  2. A longtime Hillary aide, after watching her at Recode, exclaimed: “Good God, what is she doing? She’s apparently still really, really angry. I mean, we all are. The election was stolen from her, and that’s how she feels. But to go out there publicly again and again and talk about it? And then blame the DNC? It’s not helpful to Democrats. It’s not helpful to the country, and I don’t think it’s helpful to her.”
  3. A former senior aide to Obama said Hillary’s criticisms of the DNC can make it tougher for new leaders to come forward: “It’s hard to do that when you have the former nominee out there in a newsy, aggressive manner. If she is trying to come across as the leader of the angry movement of what happened in 2016, then she’s achieving it. But part of the problem she had was she didn’t have a vision for the Democratic Party, and she needs to now take a break and let others come to the forefront.”
  4. Jamal Simmons, a Democratic strategist who worked for Al Gore’s failed presidential campaign, acknowledged some frustration among Democrats over Clinton’s remarks: “Some people I know are just frustrated that it’s happening. She is a national hero and a great public servant and has the right to be upset.” But if she’s going to discuss the loss, “it would be nice to hear a little more about the things she did wrong, which I believe mattered more than what she has discussed.” Simmons said, “When Al Gore lost the election, he went to Europe, gained weight and grew a beard. He walked away. And there’s something to that.”

Hillary’s longtime aides and advisers say she will not run for public office again, and that she feels liberated to finally speak her mind. They anticipate that Hillary will keep discussing the election, particularly to promote her upcoming book, which is expected to be published this fall.

And to that I say:

“Keep up the blame game, Hillary, so every American knows what a whiny, sore loser you are. You are ensuring another loss for your party in the 2018 midterm elections.”

Speaking of the 2018 election, Andrew O’Hehir, a Democrat and executive editor of Salon, has some interesting observations and predictions about his party’s prospects. In a recent article on Salon titled, “Wake up, liberals: There will be no 2018 ‘blue wave,’ no Democratic majority and no impeachment,” O’Hehir writes:

“For many people in . . . the left-center quadrant of the American political spectrum . . . what happened in 2016 was a nonsensical aberration . . . maybe there’s a fix right around the corner. . . .

I suspect it’s pointless to list all the things that are wrong with that scenario, because either you agree with me that it’s a delusional fantasy built on seven different varieties of magical thinking or you don’t, and in the latter case I am not likely to convince you….

Democrats have been virtually wiped out at the state and local level in non-coastal, non-metropolitan areas of the country: They had full control of 27 state legislatures in 2010, and partial control in five more; today they control 14 (with three splits)….

I have previously argued that the Democratic Party’s civil war was unavoidable and has been a long time coming…. But right now the Democratic Party has no clear sense of mission and no coherent national message, except that it is not the party of Donald Trump.”

O’Hehir predicts the GOP is “virtually guaranteed” a House majority until the next census and at least the 2022 midterms. As for the Senate, “Of the 33 Senate seats up for election next year, 25 are currently held by Democrats — and 10 of those are in states carried by Donald Trump last year. It’s far more likely that Republicans will gain seats in the Senate, perhaps by knocking off Joe Manchin in West Virginia or Heidi Heitkamp in North Dakota, than lose any at all.”

#MAGA!

~Eowyn