Category Archives: United States

CNN producer admits Trump-Russia story is ‘bullshit’ fake news

Despite the fact that the FBI is not and has never investigated Donald Trump, last night in a unanimous resolution, the Oakland City Council joined other California cities in calling on Congress to investigate and impeach President Trump.

Grandstanding for the TV camera, Councilmember Dan Kalb, a co-sponsor of the resolution, specifically highlighted among the impeachable offenses Trump’s “releasing confidential information to Russia”.

Earth to low-info Dan Kalb:

“The Trump-Russia story is fake news, which a CNN producer admitted on camera is ‘bullshit’.”

On June 26, 2017, a day before Dan Kalb’s grandstanding, James O’Keefe’s Project Veritas released an undercover video of CNN Supervising Producer John Bonifield admitting on hidden camera that there is no proof to CNN’s Russia narrative.

Calling the Russia narrative “mostly bullshit” and that “we don’t have any giant proof,” Bonifield admits “I haven’t seen any good enough evidence to show that the President committed a crime.” He continues:

“I just feel like they don’t really have it but they want to keep digging. And so I think the President is probably right to say, like, look you are witch hunting me. You have no smoking gun, you have no real proof.”

Bonifield also states that the instructions to “bullshit” the Russia-Trump fake news came straight from the top — CNN’s CEO Jeff Zucker:

“Just to give you some context, President Trump pulled out of the climate accords and for a day and a half we covered the climate accords. And the CEO of CNN (Jeff Zucker) said in our internal meeting, he said good job everybody covering the climate accords, but we’re done with that, let’s get back to Russia.

Bonifeld also admits the driving factor at CNN is ratings and business is booming because “Trump is good for business right now,” and that talk of journalistic ethics is just “adorable” propaganda fluff:

“It’s a business, people are like the media has an ethical phssssss… All the nice cutesy little ethics that used to get talked about in journalism school you’re just like, that’s adorable. That’s adorable. This is a business.”

In fact, at last week’s Cannes Lions festival in France, lying Jeff Zucker crowed that viewers trust CNN “more than ever”.

Project Veritas’ founder James O’Keefe, 32, points out what should be obvious, but evidently is not to liberal so-called journalists:

“To report not on facts, but instead on narratives that yield high ratings, is exactly the definition of fake news. We said we are going after the media, and there is a lot more to come.”

If you have even just a dollar to spare, please consider donating to Project Veritas, a very worthwhile cause. Go here.

See also:

H/t FOTM‘s MCA and Will Shanley

~Eowyn

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The fleeing antifa Caption Contest

This is the 153rd world-famous FOTM Caption Contest!

Here’s the pic:

About the pic: A patriot gives chase to an Antifa thug at a MAGA (Make America Great Again) rally in Southern California, March 25, 2017.

You know the drill:

  • Enter the contest by submitting your caption as a comment on this thread (scroll down until you see the “LEAVE A REPLY” box), not via email or on Facebook.
  • The winner of the Caption Contest will get a gorgeous Award Certificate of Excellence and a year’s free subscription to FOTM:D
  • FOTM writers will vote for the winner.
  • Any captions proffered by FOTM writers, no matter how brilliant (ha ha), will not be considered. :(

This contest will be closed in a week, at the end of next Tuesday, July 4, 2017.

To get the contest going, here’s my caption:

Rats and demons flee from the light.

For the winner of our last Caption Contest, go here.

~Eowyn

Thousands of illegal immigrants who fled to Canada in fear of Trump are trapped in legal limbo

justin trudeau welcomes immigrants

Good luck Canadian taxpayers. Enjoy paying for their hotel stays and gym visits.

From Daily Mail: Thousands of people who fled to Canada to escape President Donald Trump‘s crackdown on illegal migrants have become trapped in legal limbo because of an overburdened refugee system, struggling to find work, permanent housing or enroll their children in schools.

Refugee claims are taking longer to be completed than at any time in the past five years, according to previously unpublished Immigration and Refugee Board (IRB) data provided to Reuters.  Those wait times are set to grow longer after the IRB in April allocated ‘up to half’ of its 127 tribunal members to focus on old cases.

The number of delayed hearings more than doubled from 2015 to 2016 and is on track to increase again this year.

Hearings are crucial to establishing a claimant´s legal status in Canada. Without that status, they struggle to convince employers to hire them or landlords to rent to them.  Claimants cannot access loans or student financial aid, or update academic or professional credentials to meet Canadian standards.

Canada’s refugee system was struggling to process thousands of applications even before 3,500 asylum seekers began crossing the U.S. border on foot in January. It lacks the manpower to complete security screenings for claimants and hear cases in a timely manner.

Often there are not enough tribunal members to decide cases or interpreters to attend hearings, the IRB said. More than 4,500 hearings scheduled in the first four months of 2017 were cancelled, according to the IRB data.

The government is now focused on clearing a backlog of about 24,000 claimants, including people who filed claims in 2012 or earlier.

That means more than 15,000 people who have filed claims so far this year, including the new arrivals from the United States, will have to wait even longer for their cases to be heard.

Asylum cases are already taking longer to finalize, on average, than at any time since Canada introduced a statutory two-month time limit in 2012. This year, it has been taking 5.6 months on average, compared to 3.6 months in 2013.

Mohamed Daud, 36, left his family and a pending refugee claim in the United States and walked into Canada in February after hearing rumors of U.S. immigration raids.

Daud, originally from Somalia, had been living and working legally in Nebraska but feared he would be detained and then deported at an upcoming check-in with immigration officials. His May 8 hearing with a Canadian refugee tribunal was cancelled three days beforehand. He has not been given a new date.

‘I don´t know when they will call me. I can´t work. It isn’t easy,’ said Daud. While waiting for a work permit, he gets approximately C$600 ($453) a month in government social assistance and shares a room in an apartment with six other asylum seekers.

Still, Daud doesn’t regret abandoning his life in the United States. ‘The worry, the fear is the same,’ he said.

To try to speed cases through, Canada’s refugee tribunal has put people from certain war-torn countries such as Syria and Yemen on an expedited track that requires no hearings.

Border agents are working overtime to address the backlog in security screenings, said Scott Bardsley, spokesman for Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale, who oversees the Canada Border Services Agency.

Asylum claimants are eligible for work permits while awaiting hearings, but employers are often reluctant to employ people with temporary social insurance numbers whose future is uncertain, refugee lawyers told Reuters. ‘How do you establish yourself when your status is unknown?’ said Toronto-based lawyer Aadil Mangalji.

This year is on track to be the highest year for refugee claims since at least 2011, according to government statistics.

The stresses on the Canadian system mirror those of other countries with an open door policy. In Sweden, rising financial strains involved in resettlement were partly behind a move to introduce tough asylum laws.

Honduran Raul Contreras, 19, who walked across the Quebec border in March and whose hearing has been postponed indefinitely, is staying in a government-subsidized Toronto hotel with his mother, step-father and uncle.

Contreras, who spends his days at a local library or working out in the hotel gym, says he has been repeatedly rejected by landlords. ‘They just said that they didn’t rent places to refugee claimants,’ he said. ‘(They) said that refugees don’t have jobs and probably wouldn’t pay.’

DCG

Shocker, not: UW study finds Seattle’s minimum wage is costing jobs

shocked face

From Seattle Times: Seattle’s minimum-wage law is boosting wages for a range of low-paid workers, but the law is causing those workers as a group to lose hours, and it’s also costing jobs, according to the latest study on the measure passed by the City Council in 2014.

The report, by members of the University of Washington team studying the law’s impacts for the city of Seattle, is being published Monday by a nonprofit think tank, the National Bureau of Economic Research.

That law raises Seattle’s minimum wage gradually until it reaches $15 for all by 2021.

The UW team published its first report last July on the impact of the first jump in Seattle’s minimum wage, which went in April 2015 from $9.47 to $10 or $11 an hour, depending on business size, benefits and tips.

This latest study from the UW team looks at the effects of both the first and second jumps. The second jump, in January 2016, raised the minimum wage to $10.50 to $13. (The minimum wage has since gone up again, to the current $11 to $15. It goes up again in January to $11.50 to $15.)

The team concluded that the second jump had a far greater impact, boosting pay in low-wage jobs by about 3 percent since 2014 but also resulting in a 9 percent reduction in hours worked in such jobs. That resulted in a 6 percent drop in what employers collectively pay — and what workers earn — for those low-wage jobs.

For an average low-wage worker in Seattle, that translates into a loss of about $125 per month per job.

“If you’re a low-skilled worker with one of those jobs, $125 a month is a sizable amount of money,” said Mark Long, a UW public-policy professor and one of the authors of the report. “It can be the difference between being able to pay your rent and not being able to pay your rent.”

The report also estimated that there are about 5,000 fewer low-wage jobs in the city than there would have been without the law.

The researchers focused on “low wage” jobs — those paying under $19 an hour — and not just “minimum wage” jobs, to account for the spillover effect of employers raising the pay of those making more than minimum wage.

For instance, an employer who raised the pay of the lowest -aid workers to $13 from $11 may have then given those making $14 a boost to $14.50. (The team had also tested lower- and higher-wage thresholds for the study, and the results did not change, members said.)

To try to isolate the effects of the minimum-wage law from other factors, the UW team built a “synthetic” Seattle statistical model, aggregating areas outside King County but within the state that had previously shown numbers and trends similar to Seattle’s labor market.

The researchers then compared what happened in the real Seattle from June 2014 through September 2016 to what happened in the synthetic Seattle.

In addition to earnings, the report analyzes data on work hours— relatively rare in minimum-wage studies, the researchers said, since Washington is one of only four states that collects quarterly data on both hours and earnings.

Other studies on minimum wage have typically used lower-wage industries, such as the restaurant sector, or lower-paid groups such as teenagers, as proxies to get at employment, they said.

That was the case with a University of California, Berkeley study released last week that found Seattle’s minimum-wage law led to higher pay for restaurant workers without costing jobs in 2015 and 2016.

The UW team’s study actually corroborates the Berkeley conclusion, finding zero impact from the minimum-wage law on restaurant employment — when taking into account jobs at all wage levels within the restaurant industry.

But the UW researchers did conclude that, for low-wage restaurant workers, the law cost them work hours. (Specifically, though the actual number of hours worked by low-wage restaurant workers in Seattle increased a slight 0.1 percent from the second quarters of 2014 to 2016, the researchers’ “synthetic Seattle” model showed that if the minimum wage law hadn’t been in effect, there would have been an 11.1 percent increase in hours for those workers.)

Michael Reich, a UC Berkeley economics professor who was lead author on the Berkeley report, said he found the UW team’s report not credible for a number of reasons.

He said the UW researchers’ “synthetic” Seattle model draws only from areas in Washington that are nothing like Seattle, and the report excludes multisite businesses, which employ a large percentage of Seattle’s low-paid workforce. The latter fact was also problematic, he said, because that meant workers who left single-site businesses to work at multisite businesses were counted as job losses, not job gains in the UW study.

Reich also thought the $19 threshold was too low, and he said the UW researchers’ report “finds an unprecedented impact of wage increases on jobs, ten times more than in hundreds of minimum wage and non-minimum wage studies. … “There is no reason,” he said, that Seattle’s employers of low-paid workers “should be so much more sensitive to wage increases.”

Jacob Vigdor, a UW public policy professor and one of the authors of the UW report, stood by the team’s findings.

“When we perform the exact same analysis as the Berkeley team, we match their results, which is inconsistent with the notion that our methods create bias,” he said.

He acknowledged, and the report also says, that the study excludes multisite businesses, which include large corporations and restaurants and retail stores that own their branches directly. Single-site businesses, though — which are counted in the report — could include franchise locations that are owned separately from their corporate headquarters. Vigdor said multisite businesses were actually more likely to report staff cutbacks.

As to the substantial impact on jobs that the UW researchers found, Vigdor said: “We are concerned that it is flaws in prior studies … that have masked these responses. The fact that we find zero employment effects when using methods common in prior studies — just as those studies do — amplifies these concerns.”

He added that “Seattle’s substantial minimum-wage increase — a 37 percent rise over nine months on top of what was then the nation’s highest state minimum wage — may have induced a stronger response than the events studied in prior research.”

As to how the UW team’s findings jibe with the Seattle area’s very low unemployment rate, tight labor market, and anecdotes from hospitality employers desperately seeking low-wage workers, Vigdor said that, based on data and what he’s hearing from employers, businesses are looking to hire those with more experience.

“Traditionally, a high proportion of workers in the low-wage market are not experienced at all: teens with their first jobs, immigrants with their first jobs here,” he said. “Data is pointing to: Since we have to pay more, employers are looking for people with experience who can do the job from Day 1.”

DCG

Actors in Caesar-as-Trump assassination play in tears and fear

File this under:

The Left can give it, but not take it.

New York Public Theater’s Shakespeare in the [Central] Park this summer staged a modern “re-imagining” of the Bard’s classic Julius Caesar play, in which Caesar is stabbed to death by conspirators in the Roman Senate, but with Caesar portrayed by a Donald Trump lookalike, sporting reddish-blonde hair, wearing a suit and a tie that hangs a few inches below his belt.

To make the allusion to Trump unmistakable, Caesar’s wife, Calpurnia – who begs “Caesar” not to attend the Senate because she had a premonition about his murder — is a Melania Trump lookalike, complete with a Slavic accent. (See DCG’s post on the play here.)

In other words, the Shakespeare’s play, which ended on June 18, was “re-imagined” by Leftists into an assassinate President Trump porn.

One of the changes that became clear in the 2016 presidential election is that America’s Right really have had enough. Thus, the birth of the New or Alternative Right, who are distinguished from the traditional Right or Conservatives in that the AltRight champion American nationalism and populism, and refuse to be passive, but instead are assertive, even combative if need be.

On June 16, AltRight activists disrupted the Caesar-Trump assassination play. Laura Loomer dashed onto the stage, shouting, “This is political violence against the right!”

When Loomer was escorted by security from the stage, AltRight journalist Jack Posobiec, DC Bureau Chief of Rebel Media, who filmed the disruption from the audience, stood up and told the crowd: “You are all Nazis, like Joseph Goebbels. You are inciting terrorists. The blood of Steve Scalise is on your hands. Goebbels would be proud. You are Nazis.”

Posobiec was also escorted out by security.

During a subsequent performance of the assassinate Trump play, another AltRight protester, a man, rushed the stage shouting, “Liberal hate kills!” Indeed it does, as seen in Bernie Sanders supporter James Hodgkinson’s shooting of Congressman Steve Scalise and three others at a Republican baseball practice on June 14, 2017. (See “Pedogate and the attempted assassination of Rep. Steve Scalise”)

Police charged Loomer, Javanni Valle of Brooklyn, and Long Island man Salvatore Cipolla with trespassing.

By that time, Delta Airlines and Bank of America had withdrawn their funding of the play. Even the liberal National Endowment for the Arts distanced itself with a statement saying that no federal taxpayer dollars had been used in the production of the play.

In a June 24, 2017 article for The Guardian, decidedly nonobjective reporter Oliver Milman who calls Posobiec “a rightwing conspiracy theorist” as if there are no real conspiracies (see “Operation Northwoods: A true U.S. government conspiracy for those who mock conspiracy theories“), writes that Corey Stoll, the actor who played assassin Marcus Brutus in the Caesar-Trump play, said the protests made him “sob” and the cast “exhausted and nervous”.

BooHoo. Poor babies.

Corey Stoll, one of the Tribe, has acted in the Netflix series House of Cards and the Marvel film Ant-Man. In an essay for Vulture, Stoll moaned that the Caesar play “had become the target of hecklers and online vitriol”. Despite those evil Trump supporters, the actors pushed bravely on:

“The protesters never shut us down, but we had to fight each night to make sure they did not distort the story we were telling. At that moment, watching my castmates hold their performances together, it occurred to me that this is resistance.

When I signed on to play the reluctant assassin Marcus Brutus in this production, I didn’t know Caesar would be an explicit avatar for President Trump. I suspected that an American audience in 2017 might see aspects of him in the character, a democratically elected leader with autocratic tendencies.”

While acknowledging that Caesar was “an explicit avatar for President Trump” and that “A nontrivial percentage of our liberal audience had fantasized about undemocratic regime change in Washington,” Stoll nevertheless disingenuously proclaims that he “had little fear of offending people” and did not think anyone would see the play “as an endorsement of violence against” a duly-elected sitting President.

Really?

Stoll continues:

“The Wednesday after our opening night, a gunman opened fire on the Republican baseball team, injuring four, including Representative Steve Scalise. Of the more than 150 mass shootings so far this year, this was the first that appeared to be aimed at a politician. Like most Americans, I was saddened and horrified, but when the president’s son and others blamed us for the violence, I became scared. [,,,]

Our final show. Exhausted and nervous, we took our places. Before I could make an entrance, someone started screaming and was led off, as the audience angrily turned against him. [,,,] During the assassination, another person sprinted to the stage, yelling, ‘I’m sick of your bullshit!’ He was tackled almost immediately. Forty-five minutes later, we finished the show, and our run, as scheduled. Backstage, I exhaled and sobbed.”

Everyone and altogether, say:

~Eowyn

From the masters of fake news, CNN’s latest hit piece: ‘Trumpcare’ would send California couple to Mexico for birth control

hyperbole

CNN doing what they do best: fake news.

From CNN: All Ariana and Kevin Gonzalez want is birth control.  As far as health care needs go, that’s pretty simple. But the California couple says that if the Republican alternative to Obamacare becomes law, they’ll be driving over the border to Mexico to get it.

It’s not that the Gonzalezes don’t have insurance; they have very good insurance through Ariana’s job as a high school teacher.

The problem is that “Trumpcare,” as Ariana calls it, would probably run her health clinic out of town. It’s Planned Parenthood, which the Republican health care proposal defunds because it performs abortions.

The Gonzalezes live in the Imperial Valley, an agricultural area two hours east of San Diego, with a severe doctor shortage. On average in California, there’s one primary care physician for every 1,341 people. In the Imperial Valley, there’s one physician for every 4,170 people, according to the University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute.

For Ariana, that means it takes well over a month to get an appointment with her gynecologist and then four or five hours in the waiting room to see him, which means she has to take the day off work. At Planned Parenthood, she gets an appointment the next day and is in and out in about 30 minutes.

If the Republican plan passes and Planned Parenthood leaves town, Ariana says, her best option would be to cross the border, where she can see a gynecologist immediately. It’s an option she doesn’t want to take but will if she has to.

Ariana has a message for senators as they contemplate whether to pass the law, also known as the American Health Care Act. “If (Planned Parenthood’s) doors are shut, you’ll be driving your own constituents to an entirely different country in search of health care, and that’s not America,” she said. “I don’t think that’s who we are as a country.”

Ariana, 23, knows what life would be like without Planned Parenthood in her town because she’s lived it.  Before Planned Parenthood opened in the Imperial Valley two years ago, she became pregnant when she didn’t want to, and then later she couldn’t get pregnant when she did want to.

Without easy access to birth control, Ariana became pregnant at 15. A doctor tried to convince her to have an abortion, saying she was one of countless teen moms he’d seen just that week. “He said it would be better for me, and we could have it done in 10 minutes if I just said the word,” she remembers. But Ariana, now 23, says her “maternal instinct kicked in,” and she never considered termination.

In the summer of 2011, when her son, Oliver, was 18 months old and she was 18 years old, Ariana met her future husband.  She wasn’t looking for love — in fact, she’d shunned dating to focus on caring for Oliver and preparing to study at San Diego State University in the fall.

But one day, she was visiting a friend when Kevin and his brother showed up to visit. They were hanging out in the front yard, and she excused herself to go inside and check on her napping son. “I was expecting ‘you have a child?!’ “she remembers. “But he just said, ‘OK, no problem.’ He didn’t blink an eye.”

Kevin proposed a few months later and adopted Oliver. They tried to have another child so Oliver would have a sibling close in age, but Ariana suffered three miscarriages, including one with twins. Then, an ectopic pregnancy permanently damaged one of her fallopian tubes, and she was unable to get pregnant for nearly two years.

With each medical failure, Ariana sought advice from her gynecologist, and each time, the wait for an appointment was about six weeks. The Gonzalezes’ hope for another child seemed to be stuck in an endless cycle of complications and long waits to see the doctor.

They say they wish Planned Parenthood had been in their town then, as the clinic, unlike her gynecologist’s office, treats infertility without long waits.

Finally, after nearly four years of miscarriages and infertility, Ariana’s doctor prescribed steroids, and she became pregnant with their daughter, Bailey. She wanted to see her obstetrician immediately, but again she faced a six-week wait. “We needed to make sure that this pregnancy was going to stick and it was going to be healthy, and in order to do that, off to Mexico we went,” she said.

Read the rest of the story here.

h/t Twitchy

DCG

Unintended consequences: California’s travel ban may trip up intercollegiate athletic teams

unintended consequences

Way to punish the athletes and guarantee diminishing alumni donations. Brilliant move California…

From SF Gate: California’s newly expanded ban on state-funded travel to states that discriminate against LGBT people could trip up intercollegiate athletic teams in the coming years — not only by restricting where they may play, but how they tap new recruits.

As of Thursday, state employees — including those at the University of California and California State University — are banned from traveling on the public dime to eight states. The shunned states often appear on college teams’ travel schedules. They are: Alabama, Texas, Kansas, North Carolina, Tennessee, Kentucky, Mississippi and South Dakota.

“In terms of recruiting, under current California law our coaches would be restricted from using state funds to travel to affected states,” says a statement issued Friday by the Cal Athletics Department.

On Friday, a day after state Attorney General Xavier Becerra expanded the list from four to eight states, his office told The Chronicle it had received a request for a legal opinion on whether the ban applies to “athletic team staffs” at UC and CSU. His office did not respond when asked who had made the request.

Each of the states in the ban has enacted a discriminatory law since June 26, 2015, according to Becerra, such as preventing adoptions and foster care by lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender people (South Dakota and Alabama) or allowing school clubs to restrict membership on that basis (Kentucky). In Texas, a law that passed June 15 prohibits the state from “taking adverse action” against religious caregivers, which critics say gives them too much power over the welfare of LGBT children.

California’s travel ban took effect in January and specifically includes the two university systems. But it also exempts them from the ban to fulfill any athletic contracts they entered into with schools in the affected states before Jan. 1. That helps many major college athletic teams — for now — because they set their travel schedules with other schools sometimes years in advance.

But the exemption does not apply to collegiate postseason contests, where teams that do well could find they are headed for one of the states in question.

Eight sports are scheduled to have their top-tier NCAA regionals or championships in states affected by the travel ban within a year: Texas, Alabama, Kentucky and North Carolina. The most notable is the men’s Final Four basketball championship, to be held in San Antonio.

The others are men’s and women’s cross country, women’s gymnastics, men’s and women’s tennis, and men’s and women’s indoor track. Championships for lower-tier schools, including many in the CSU system, also are scheduled for some of the states included in the ban.

When California’s ban took effect in January, the Cal athletic department issued a statement saying: “Our intent is to support our student-athletes in their right to participate in NCAA postseason competition should they be assigned to a restricted state.”

But it’s not clear how they could do that, short of raising private donations to support not only travel costs, but also salaries for coaches and staff, and potentially insurance.

Meanwhile, Cal had been in preliminary talks for a men’s basketball series with the University of Kansas in January, when the travel ban that included Kansas took effect. “Cal got back to us and told us the state ban would prevent it,” said Jim Marchiony, a spokesman for KU athletics.

On Friday, Cal issued a new statement affirming its support of “equity, diversity and inclusion,” adding: “We have an obligation and firm commitment to remain compliant with California law.” The statement also said Cal will fulfill any contracts it signed with affected states before January.

Cal’s baseball team is signed on to play in the Frisco College Baseball Classic in March in Texas. The contract for the event, which features Texas A&M, Baylor and Louisiana Tech, was signed two years ago, former Bears head coach David Esquer said.

At California State University, several campuses have major sports teams, including Cal State Fullerton, San Diego State, Long Beach State, Fresno State and San Jose State.

The news that Texas is now included in the travel ban has made some sports fans nervous at San Jose State, and Lawrence Fan, spokesman for campus athletics, has been fielding questions — mostly about whether the San Jose Spartans will be able to play its scheduled football game at the University of Texas in September. Fan tells them not to worry. The contract was signed in September.

Nevertheless, CSU is taking a close look at the expanded travel ban and will consult with the attorney general if needed, said Toni Molle, spokeswoman for systemwide Chancellor Timothy White. However, she said, “The CSU fully intends to comply with the law, and we will not be using any state funds to pay for travel expenses to any of the banned states.”

Ricardo Vazquez, a spokesman for UC, agreed. But he said, “There have been instances where UC sports teams or researchers attending conferences have used nonstate funds to travel to the states on the list.”

Vazquez did not reply when asked for examples.

At UCLA, spokeswoman Liza David said the Department of Intercollegiate Athletics receives no state funding, but said that UCLA is “committed to promoting and protecting equity, diversity and inclusion.”

DCG