Category Archives: Travel

We have a winner!

. . . for FOTM’s 204th Caption Contest!

This was a quite competitive contest, with three outstanding captions contending for first place.

The writers of FOTM voted for what each considered to be the best (#1) and second-best (#2) captions. Each #1 vote is worth 4 points; a #2 vote is worth 2 points.

And the winner of the 204th FOTM Caption Contest, with two #1 votes and three #2 votes, totaling a whopping 14 points, is . . .

William!

Here is the brilliant winning caption:

Bernie, suddenly aware that he is being photographed, attempts to conceal his copy of The Communist Manifesto.

Cornell and kjf are both in second place, each with two #1 votes and one #2 vote, totaling 10 points each. Here are their captions:

Cornell: “FLY AIR MARXISM!”

kjf: “Why could Mossad not upgrade me to Epstein’s plane?”

Ron W is in 3rd place, with one #1 vote and one #2 vote, totaling 6 points. Here is his caption:

As a quote I’ve seen says, “Socialism is not for the socialist.”

Goldbug is in 4th place, with one #1 vote and 4 points. Here is the caption:

Wow, was she good or what? And only fifty bucks?

Kevin Lankford and Jackie Puppet are in 5th place, each with one #2 vote and 2 points. Here are their captions:

Kevin Lankford: “No!…No!!…I tell ya!…You know I would not lie. I’m sure they told me this was the [W]orst class.”

Jackie Puppet: “Some of us are more equal than others!”

WELL DONE, EVERYONE!

Congratulations, William!

Here is your super-duper Award of Excellence, all ready for framing!

For all the other caption submissions, go here.

Be here tomorrow for our next, very exciting Caption Contest!

~Eowyn

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Top 10 countries with the most U.S. retirees collecting Social Security

The list will surprise you.

From Market Watch, July 26, 2019:

Of course, the above list doesn’t necessarily mean those are the top 10 countries of American retirees because:

  1. Some Americans may be retired abroad and not collecting Social Security.
  2. Others may have their Social Security checks deposited in the U.S. but live abroad.
  3. Others may live abroad just part time.

How to explain the countries in the list:

  • Labor economist Teresa Ghilarducci, an expert in retirement security and a professor of economics at The New School for Social Research, says that people often retire where they have family ties, so the dominance of Canada and Mexico, for example, on the list make sense, as many Americans have family in both countries.
  • Jennifer Stevens, executive editor at International Living, says “The numbers lean toward places where the U.S. has a strong military presence,” which helps explain why Japan and Germany are so high on the list.

Few Americans actually retire abroad. According to Social Security Administration data, about 413,000 retired workers get their Social Security benefits abroad out of the tens of millions who receive these benefits.

For Americans who dream of retiring abroad, Cynthia Staton, who with her husband runs a website that helps people retire abroad, says you should consider these factors:

  1. What is your ideal weather?
  2. How close do you want to be to your family?
  3. What level of health care do you require?
  4. Do you want to live in a city, a town, or off the grid? In the mountains, at the beach, or by a lake?
  5. What are your deal breakers? Do you need a specific medication? Are there mobility issues?

Staton advises you should visit the country and place, or even temporarily live there to test it out: “Don’t make the mistake of superficially choosing a place that reminds you of where you like to vacation. You go on vacation to get away from daily life, not for it to become your 24/7/365.”

~Eowyn

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Man foaming-green-stuff-from-mouth among mysterious deaths of American tourists in Dominican Republic

American tourists in the Dominican Republic are dying suddenly and mysteriously.

The Dominican Republic occupies half of an island in the Caribbean; the other half is Haiti.

One such fatality is an Arizona man, 62-year-old Mark Hulburt Sr., who had “something green” foaming from his mouth following his sudden death.

Jackie Salo and Chris Perez report for the New York Post, June 17, 2010, that Hulburt’s family says he was seemingly healthy prior to the trip, but was found dead by his wife at a hotel in Punta Cana. Although the cause of death was listed as a heart attack, his family now suspects that something else is to blame following the recent reports of other tourists dying under strange circumstances and similar conditions.

Hulbert’s son, Mark Hulburt Jr., told AZ Family: “It was not something that any of us thought was going to happen. It was something that came way out of left field. She [the wife] woke up, and he didn’t. She told me that as she found him that he had something green coming from his mouth. Having known then what I know now I would have fought tooth and nail to have his remains brought back here and had his autopsy done here in America.”

There have been other reports of tourist fatalities in the Dominican Republic in the past month, with some happening recently and others months earlier. They include:

  • In July 2018, David Harrison from Maryland died suddenly at the Hard Rock Hotel & Casino in Punta Cana. His relatives said that before going to bed, Harrison fell ill and died the next day from pulmonary edema and heart attack.
  • In April 2019, Robert Bell Wallace, 67, died from unknown causes also at the Hard Rock Hotel & Casino in Punta Cana. His family said he became unwell after drinking a glass of scotch from the minibar.
  • On May 25, 2019, Miranda Schaup-Werner, 41, of Pennsylvania, died from a heart attack after having a drink from the minibar at the Luxury Bahia Principe Bouganville, a luxury seafront resort in La Romana, 70 miles east of Punta Cana.
  • Weeks later, Staten Island resident Leyla Cox, 53, died from a heart attack while on a trip to the same Luxury Bahia Principe Bouganville. Relatives have asked for her body to be returned to the U.S. for a second autopsy — claiming that country’s toxicology machines were broken when they attempted the first one.
  • The latest fatality is Joseph Allen, 55, of Woodbridge, New Jersey. He was staying at the Terra Linda Resort in Sosúa when he felt hot and sick before he suddenly died over night. His sister, Jamie Reed, told ABC News that she found him on the morning of June 13. Allen’s family released a statement saying they, too, fear he was “the victim of a wrongful death.”

The families of the dead have been asking that their cases be re-examined as more and more information continues to emerge. Hulburt Jr. observes: “Some seemingly quite healthy people seem to be having heart attacks out of the blue. Seeing everybody else that has passed, it’s brought up a lot of the same feelings. It’s been like a scab picked over and over again, all these people with the same causes all dying needlessly.”

There are also cases of American tourists in the Dominican Republic getting very sick.

The New York Post reports, June 17, 2019, that a group of Oklahoma teens’ senior trip to the Dominican Republic was ruined when they fell sick with a mysterious illness.

On June 8, a group of recent Deer Creek High School graduates flew to the Hard Rock Hotel & Casino in Punta Cana, where at least two Americans have died and others have fallen ill.

For the first day, the teens enjoyed themselves hanging out on the beach. But after dining at the resort’s Japanese restaurant, the trip took a turn for the worse. Seven members of the group fell sick and were rushed by ambulance to the hospital, where they received anti-nausea medicine.

One of the teens, Bennet Hill, told KOCO: “I just woke up, and my stomach was cramping and I was sweating. I was freezing. We’ve been hooked up to IVs since we first got here with antibiotics, just getting hydrated.”

Liz McLaughlin, the mother of one of the sick teens, Libby, said they have “no idea what’s going on. We just don’t know what is happening. Is it the water? Is it the ice? Is it the food? Is it the food handling? Is it the pesticides?”

It’s unclear whether the group’s illnesses are linked to the fatal cases recently reported at the resort.

A Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Punta Cana spokesperson said the resort “immediately took corrective action” after the group of students fell ill. “Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Punta Cana is disappointed regarding a recent situation in which a group of guests became ill after dining at one of our twelve venues. As the safety and health of our guests is now, and has always been our highest priority, Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Punta Cana is regretful that we did not achieve the extremely high standards we set for ourselves.”

Blah, blah, blah.

~Eowyn

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ID’s? We don’t need no stinking IDs!

An American citizen who wants to board a commercial airplane must first show a government issued photo identification card to a federal agent, and then undergo a search that includes an X-ray and frequently a hand search of all carry-on items, taking off your shoes and belt, dumping EVERYHHING out of your pockets, and, finally, undergoing a full-body scan, with your hands over your head, by a machine that shows an image of EVERYTHING beneath your clothing as if you had walked through the scanner buck naked. It is the electronic equivalent of a full body strip search.

Oooooh baby!

But, there is one demographic that neither has to show an ID, nor or undergo a security check.

Yes, you guessed it.

Illegal aliens.

Since December 2018, the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) has permitted illegal aliens released from custody to board domestic flights without having any of 15 forms of identification typically required for airline travel, the Washington Examiner reported exclusively on Thursday. The practice has been in place for at least six months and perhaps considerably longer, according to some sources.

A TSA spokesperson told the Washington Examiner that illegal aliens could fly without identification as long as they provided Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Form I-862, the “Notice to Appear” form that is provided to immigrants who have applied for asylum, passed a credible fear assessment, and could wait up to five years for a federal judge to decide their case.

The form can serve as identification because it is only issued after a background check has been conducted on the applicant while in federal custody, the spokesperson noted.

The TSA’s website lists 15 forms of identification acceptable to travel, which are:

•Driver’s licenses or other state photo identity cards issued by Department of Motor Vehicles (or equivalent)
•U.S. passport
•U.S. passport card
•DHS trusted traveler cards (Global Entry, NEXUS, SENTRI, FAST)
•U.S. Department of Defense ID, including IDs issued to dependents
•Permanent resident card
•Border crossing card
•DHS-designated enhanced driver’s license
•Federally recognized, tribal-issued photo ID
•HSPD-12 PIV card
•Foreign government-issued passport
•Canadian provincial driver’s license or Indian and Northern Affairs Canada card
•Transportation worker identification credential
•U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Employment Authorization Card (I-766)
•U.S. Merchant Mariner Credential

However, form I-862 is not listed as an acceptable form of identification, and it isn’t provided until 180 days after approval of a credible fear claim.

A U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) official told the Washington Examiner that Form I-862’s sole purpose is to tell applicants when to appear in court, and it cannot authorize applicants to travel.

“TSA accepts identification documentation issued by other government agencies, which is validated through the issuing agency. All passengers are then subject to appropriate screening measures,” the TSA said in a statement to Washington Examiner.

But, Republican Rep. Steve King tweeted Wednesday, “Illegals enter the U.S. every day with no ID. Until recently, DHS didn’t even finger print those under 14 but has flown illegals of all ages to every state. No way they all have valid ID’s. If they fly commercial, TSA has to be waiving the valid ID requirement.”

Illegal aliens may have used Form I-862s as identification for travel since 2014.

In 2014, Vice President of the National Border Patrol Council Shawn Moran told KFOX14 that border patrol agents had observed TSA agents accepting the I-862 form and allowing the illegals to fly wherever they pleased with no questions asked.

“These documents are easily reproduced on any type of copier or home computer, they have no photographs, so there’s really no way to verify that the person holding them is actually who they say they are,” Moran told KFOX14 at the time. “We’re just concerned that the commercial transportation system could be exploited by somebody claiming to be another person.”

~ Grif

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Saturday funnies, the Nancy Pelosi grounded edition!

DCG

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State Department issues dire travel warning for Mexico

Wed, 23 Aug 2017 13:14:45 +0000

eowyn2

Yesterday, August 22, the U.S. State Department issued a dire-sounding “Mexico Travel Warning” that includes popular and tourist destinations — Acapulco, Cancun, Mazatlan, Puerto Vallarta, Tijuana, Vera Cruz, and Yucatan (Chichen Itza):

The U.S. Department of State warns U.S. citizens about the risk of traveling to certain parts of Mexico due to the activities of criminal organizations in those areas.  U.S. citizens have been the victims of violent crimes, including homicide, kidnapping, carjacking, and robbery in various Mexican states. This Travel Warning replaces the Travel Warning for Mexico issued December 8, 2016.

For information on security conditions in specific regions of Mexico, see our state-by-state assessments below. U.S. government personnel and their families are prohibited from personal travel to all areas to which the Department recommends “defer non-essential travel” in this Travel Warning. As a result of security precautions that U.S. government personnel must take while traveling to parts of Mexico, our response time to emergencies involving U.S. citizens may be hampered or delayed. 

Gun battles between rival criminal organizations or with Mexican authorities have taken place on streets and in public places during broad daylight. The Mexican government dedicates substantial resources to protect visitors to major tourist destinations and has engaged in an extensive effort to counter criminal organizations that engage in narcotics trafficking and other unlawful activities throughout Mexico. There is no evidence that criminal organizations have targeted U.S. citizens based on their nationality. Resort areas and tourist destinations in Mexico generally do not see the level of drug-related violence and crime that are reported in the border region or in areas along major trafficking routes.

U.S. government personnel are prohibited from patronizing adult clubs and gambling establishments in the states of Coahuila, Durango, Zacatecas, Aguascalientes, San Luis Potosi, Nuevo Leon, Tamaulipas, Jalisco, Colima, and Nayarit.

Kidnappings in Mexico take the following forms:

  • Traditional:  victim is physically abducted and held captive until a ransom is paid for release.
  • Express:  victim is abducted for a short time and commonly forced to withdraw money, usually from an ATM, then released.
  • Virtual:  an extortion-by-deception scheme where a victim is contacted by phone and coerced by threats of violence to provide phone numbers of family and friends, and then isolated until the ransom is paid.  Recently, hotel guests have been targets of such “virtual” kidnapping schemes.

U.S. citizens have been murdered in carjackings and highway robberies, most frequently at night and on isolated roads. Carjackers use a variety of techniques, including roadblocks, bumping/moving vehicles to force them to stop, and running vehicles off the road at high speeds. There are indications that criminals target newer and larger vehicles, but drivers of old sedans and buses coming from the United States are also targeted. U.S. government personnel are not permitted to drive from the U.S.-Mexico border to or from the interior parts of Mexico. U.S. government personnel are prohibited from intercity travel after dark in many areas of Mexico. U.S. citizens should use toll roads (cuotas) whenever possible. In remote areas, cell phone coverage is limited or non-existent.

The Mexican government has deployed federal police and military personnel throughout the country as part of its efforts to combat organized criminal groups.  U.S. citizens traveling on Mexican roads and highways by car or bus may encounter government checkpoints, staffed by military or law enforcement personnel. In some places, criminal organizations have erected their own unauthorized checkpoints, at times wearing police and military uniforms, and have killed or abducted motorists who have failed to stop at them. You should cooperate at all checkpoints.

State-by-State Assessment: Below is a state-by-state assessment of security conditions throughout Mexico. Travelers should be mindful that even if no advisories are in effect for a given state, U.S. citizens should exercise caution throughout Mexico as crime and violence can still occur. For general information about travel and other conditions in Mexico, see our Country Specific Information.

Aguascalientes: Intercity travel at night is prohibited for U.S. government personnel.

Baja California (includes Tijuana, Rosarito, Ensenada, Tecate, and Mexicali): Exercise caution in the northern state of Baja California, particularly at night. Criminal activity and violence, including homicide, remain an issue throughout the state. According to the Baja California State Secretariat for Public Security, the state of Baja California experienced an increase in homicide rates compared to the same period in 2016. While most of these homicides appeared to be targeted, criminal organization assassinations, turf battles between criminal groups have resulted in violent crime in areas frequented by U.S. citizens. Shooting incidents injuring innocent bystanders have occurred during daylight hours. Due to poor cellular service and general road conditions, U.S. government personnel are only allowed to travel on “La Rumarosa” between Mexicali-Tijuana on the toll road during daylight hours.

Baja California Sur (includes Los Cabos and La Paz): Criminal activity and violence, including homicide, remain an issue throughout the state. Exercise caution as Baja California Sur continues to experience a high rate of homicides. According to Secretaría de Seguridad Pública del Estado de Baja California and Secretaría de Gobernación statistics, the state of Baja California Sur experienced an increase in homicide rates compared to the same period in 2016. While most of these homicides appeared to be targeted, criminal organization assassinations, turf battles between criminal groups have resulted in violent crime in areas frequented by U.S. citizens. Shooting incidents, in which innocent bystanders have been injured, have occurred during daylight hours.

Campeche: No advisory is in effect.

Chiapas (includes Palenque and San Cristobal de las Casas): U.S. government personnel must remain in tourist areas and are not allowed to use public transportation.

Chihuahua (includes Ciudad Juarez, the city of Chihuahua, Ojinaga, Palomas, Nuevo Casas Grandes and Copper Canyon): Criminal activity and violence remains an issue throughout the state of Chihuahua and its major cities. If you plan to drive in the state of Chihuahua, you should limit travel to daylight hours on major highways and follow the recommendations below.

  • Ciudad Juarez: Exercise caution in all areas. U.S. government personnel are prohibited from traveling after dark west of Eje Juan Gabriel and south of Boulevard Zaragoza. Defer non-essential travel to the areas southeast of Boulevard Independencia and the Valle de Juarez region.
  • Within the city of Chihuahua: Defer non-essential travel to the Morelos, Villa, and Zapata districts, where the travel of U.S. government personnel is restricted.
  • Ojinaga: Travel via U.S. Highway 67 through the Presidio, Texas port-of-entry.
  • Palomas and the Nuevo Casas Grandes/Paquime region: Use U.S. Highway 11 through the Columbus, New Mexico port-of- entry.
  • Nuevo Casas Grandes: U.S. government personnel are prohibited from traveling outside of city limits after dark.
  • Copper Canyon and other areas of the state of Chihuahua: U.S. citizens should defer non-essential travel.

Coahuila: U.S. citizens should defer non-essential travel to Coahuila, with the exception of Saltillo, Bosques de Monterreal, and Parras de la Fuente, because of the high incidence of violent crime, particularly along the highways between Piedras Negras and Nuevo Laredo. State and municipal law enforcement capacity is limited in some parts of Coahuila, particularly in the north. U.S. government personnel are allowed to travel during daylight hours to Saltillo, Bosques de Monterreal, and Parras de la Fuente, using the most direct routes and maximizing the use of toll highways. Between 1 a.m. and 6 a.m., U.S. government personnel must abide by the Embassy-imposed curfew and remain within Saltillo, Bosques de Monterreal, or Parras de la Fuente.

Colima (includes Manzanillo): U.S. government personnel are prohibited from intercity travel at night, from traveling within 12 miles of the Colima-Michoacán border, and from traveling on Route 110 between La Tecomaca and the Jalisco border. U.S. citizens should defer non-essential travel to this border region, including the city of Tecoman.

Durango: Violence and criminal activity along the highways are a continuing security concern. U.S. government personnel may travel outside of the city of Durango only during daylight hours on toll roads. Between 1 a.m. and 6 a.m., U.S. government personnel must abide by the Embassy-imposed curfew and remain within the city of Durango.

Estado de Mexico (includes Toluca and Teotihuacan): U.S. citizens should defer all non-essential travel to the municipalities of Coacalco, Ecatepec, Nezahualcoyotl, La Paz, Valle del Chalco, Solidaridad, Chalco, Ixtapaluca, and Tlatlaya due to high rates of crime and insecurity, unless traveling directly through the areas on major thoroughfares. Avoid traveling on any roads between Huitzilac, Morelos, and Santa Martha, Estado de Mexico, including the Lagunas de Zempoala National Park and surrounding areas.

Guanajuato (includes San Miguel de Allende and Leon): No advisory is in effect.

Guerrero (includes Acapulco, Ixtapa, Taxco, and Zihuatanejo): Personal travel to the entire state of Guerrero, including Acapulco, is prohibited for U.S. government personnel. Self-defense groups operate independently of the government in many areas of Guerrero. Armed members of these groups frequently maintain roadblocks and, although not considered hostile to foreigners or tourists, are suspicious of outsiders and should be considered volatile and unpredictable.

Hidalgo: No advisory is in effect.

Jalisco (includes Guadalajara, Puerto Vallarta, and Lake Chapala): U.S. citizens should defer non-essential travel to areas that border the states of Michoacán and Zacatecas because of continued instability. U.S. government personnel are prohibited from personal travel to areas of Jalisco that border Zacatecas, intercity travel after hours, and from using Highway 80 between Cocula and La Huerta. U.S. government personnel are authorized to use Federal toll road 15D for travel to Mexico City; however, they may not stop in the town of La Barca or Ocotlan for any reason.

Mexico City (formerly known as the Federal District): No advisory is in effect.

Michoacan (includes Morelia): U.S. citizens should defer non-essential travel to the state of Michoacan, except the cities of Morelia and Lazaro Cardenas, and the area north of federal toll road 15D. U.S. government personnel are prohibited from traveling by land in Michoacan except on federal toll road 15D during daylight hours. Flying into Morelia and Lazaro Cardenas is permitted for U.S. government personnel.

Morelos (includes Cuernavaca): U.S. citizens should defer non-essential travel on any roads between Huitzilac in the northwest corner of the state and Santa Martha, Estado de Mexico, including the Lagunas de Zempoala National Park and surrounding areas.

Nayarit (includes the Riviera Nayarit coast, including the cities of Tepic, Xalisco, and San Blas): U.S. government personnel may travel to Riviera Nayarit, San Blas, Santa María del Oro, Tepic, and Xalisco using major highways. Intercity travel at night is prohibited for U.S. government personnel. Defer non-essential travel to other areas of the state.

Nuevo Leon (includes Monterrey): U.S. government personnel may travel outside the city of Monterrey only during daylight hours on toll roads. Between 1 a.m. and 6 a.m., U.S. government personnel must abide by the Embassy-imposed curfew and remain within the municipal boundaries of San Pedro Garza Garcia or Santa Catarina (south of the Santa Catarina river). Travel to and from Monterrey airport is permitted at any time.

Oaxaca (includes Oaxaca, Huatulco, and Puerto Escondido): U.S. government personnel must remain in tourist areas and are not allowed to use public transportation in Oaxaca City. U.S. government personnel are prohibited from traveling on Highway 200 throughout the state, except to transit between the airport in Huatulco to hotels in Puerto Escondido and Huatulco, and they are not permitted to travel to the El Istmo region. The El Istmo region is defined by Highway 185D to the west, Highway 190 to the north, and the Oaxaca/Chiapas border to the east and includes the towns of Juchitan de Zaragoza, Salina Cruz, and San Blas.

Puebla: No advisory is in effect.

Queretaro: No advisory is in effect.

Quintana Roo (includes Cancun, Cozumel, Playa del Carmen, Riviera Maya, and Tulum): U.S. citizens should be aware that according to Government of Mexico statistics, the state of Quintana Roo experienced an increase in homicide rates compared to 2016. While most of these homicides appeared to be targeted criminal organization assassinations, turf battles between criminal groups have resulted in violent crime in areas frequented by U.S. citizens. Shooting incidents, in which innocent bystanders have been injured or killed, have occurred.

San Luis Potosi: U.S. government personnel may travel outside the city of San Luis Potosi only during daylight hours on toll roads. Between 1 a.m. and 6 a.m., U.S. government personnel must abide by the Embassy-imposed curfew and remain within the city of San Luis Potosi.

Sinaloa (includes Mazatlan): One of Mexico’s most powerful criminal organizations is based in the state of Sinaloa, and violent crime rates remain high in many parts of the state. Defer non-essential travel to the state of Sinaloa, except the cities of Mazatlan, Los Mochis, and the Port of Topolobampo. Travel in Mazatlan should be limited to Zona Dorada, the historic town center, as well as direct routes to and from these locations and the airport. Travel in Los Mochis and Topolobampo is restricted to the city and the port, as well as direct routes to/from these locations and the airport.

Sonora (includes Nogales, Puerto Peñasco, Hermosillo, and San Carlos): Sonora is a key region in the international drug and human trafficking trades. U.S. citizens traveling throughout Sonora are encouraged to limit travel to main roads during daylight hours and exercise caution on the Highway 15 corridor from Nogales to Empalme. Puerto Peñasco should be visited using the Lukeville, Arizona/Sonoyta, Sonora border crossing, and limit driving to daylight hours.

Due to illegal activity, U.S. citizens should defer non-essential travel to:

  • The triangular region west of Nogales, east of Sonoyta, and north of Caborca (including the towns of Saric, Tubutama, and Altar).
  • The eastern edge of the state of Sonora, which borders the state of Chihuahua (all points along that border east of Federal Highway 17, the road between Moctezuma and Sahuaripa, and state Highway 20 between Sahuaripa and the intersection with Federal Highway 16).
  • South of Hermosillo, with the exception of the cities of Alamos, Guaymas, and Empalme.  Defer non-essential travel east of Highway 15, within the city of Ciudad Obregon, and south of the city of Navojoa.

Tabasco (includes Villahermosa): No advisory is in effect.

Tamaulipas (includes Matamoros, Nuevo Laredo, Reynosa, and Tampico): U.S. citizens should defer all non-essential travel to the state of Tamaulipas due to violent crime, including homicide, armed robbery, carjacking, kidnapping, extortion, and sexual assault. The number of reported kidnappings in Tamaulipas is among the highest in Mexico. State and municipal law enforcement capacity is limited to nonexistent in many parts of Tamaulipas. Violent criminal activity occurs more frequently along the northern border and organized criminal groups may target public and private passenger buses traveling through Tamaulipas. These groups sometimes take all passengers hostage and demand ransom payments.  U.S. government personnel are subject to movement restrictions and a curfew between midnight and 6 a.m. Matamoros, Reynosa, Nuevo Laredo, and Ciudad Victoria have experienced numerous gun battles and attacks with explosive devices in the past year.

Tlaxcala: No advisory is in effect.

Veracruz: U.S. government personnel must remain in tourist areas and are not allowed to use public transportation. Road travel should be limited to daylight hours only.

Yucatan (includes Merida and Chichen Itza): No advisory is in effect.

Zacatecas: U.S. government personnel may travel outside the city of Zacatecas only during daylight hours on toll roads. Between 1 a.m. and 6 a.m., U.S. government personnel must abide by the Embassy-imposed curfew and remain within the city of Zacatecas.

For further information:

  • See the State Department’s travel website for the Worldwide Caution, Travel Warnings, Travel Alerts, and Country Specific Information for Mexico.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive security messages and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Contact the U.S. Embassy in Mexico, located at Paseo de la Reforma 305, Colonia Cuauhtemoc, at +52-55-5080- 2000 x4440, (5080-2000 for calls in Mexico City, 01-55-5080-2000 for long distance calls in Mexico) 8:30 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Monday through Friday.  After- hours emergency number for U.S. citizens is +52-55-5080-2000.
  • Call 1-888-407-4747 toll-free in the United States and Canada or 1-202-501-4444 from other countries from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Eastern Standard Time, Monday through Friday (except U.S. federal holidays).
  • Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Also note that Acapulco was the 2nd and Tijuana the 22nd most dangerous cities in the world in 2017.

So if you still choose to go to Mexico for “fun,” you are forewarned!

~Eowyn

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Danish State TV burns effigy of President Trump


In 2015, a YouGov poll conducted for the Danish publication Metroxpress found that 1 in 2  or 50% of Danish citizens favored a cap on the number of Muslims permitted to live in Denmark. The poll, which specifically addressed immigration from non-Western countries, also found one in four Danes do not want the country’s population to be more than 5% Muslim. (International Business Times)
Denmark’s total population is less than 6 million, which means 1 in 2 Danes do not want the number of Muslims in Denmark to exceed 300,000.
Danish nationalists want even less.
In July 2016, as reported by the AP (via US News & World Report), officials of Denmark’s second largest political party — the anti-immigrant Danish People’s Party (DPP) — said the 270,000 Muslims in Denmark at the time posed a severe risk of harboring sympathizers to the Islamic State militant group, and that the party’s goal is to see Muslim immigrants in Denmark “as close to zero as possible.” As DPP immigration spokesman Martin Henriksen put it:

“Islam is a belligerent religion. One should not be blind that many who commit terror find inspiration in Islam. That is why there is a connection between the number of Muslims in a country and the general security risk.”

The DPP was condemned by Denmark’s largest party, the Social Democrats, and compared to — HORRORS! — then-presidential candidate Donald Trump. Social Democrat lawmaker Lars Aslan Rasmussen, whose father is Muslim, said the Danish People’s Party’s position is “far out” and amounted to “religious discrimination, religious apartheid.”
Although compared to Sweden (see “Sweden on brink of civil war: 61 no-go Muslim zones; police chief pleads for help“), Denmark has experienced relatively less violence from Islamic migrants, nevertheless in February 2015, a Danish gunman of Palestinian descent killed a filmmaker and a guard at a synagogue and wounded five police officers before being fatally shot himself.
Denmark is also where Muslim migrants torture and kill cats for fun.

But none of that matters. Instead, to the Danish government, it is President Trump who is evil for installing a TEMPORARY travel ban of people from countries that are home to terrorists, i.e., Muslim-majority Middle-East countries.

And so, on June 23, 2017, taxpayer-financed Danish State TV (Danish Broadcasting Corporation) and Danish Radio celebrated Midsummer by burning a life-size effigy of President Trump in a bonfire.
Danish State TV told its viewers that the Trump effigy was burned as a “symbol of all the evil men in the world”. (10News)
When and if Denmark ever appeals to NATO or the United States for help with their Muslim “migrants,” America should turn a deaf ear and remind them of their malicious Trump-effigy burning.
~Eowyn

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You're a Nazi if you stand for free speech


A man peacefully holding a sign that says “The right to openly discuss ideas must be defended,” is verbally assaulted by Leftists, some wearing black masks to conceal their faces, and called “Nazi scum” who should get “off our street”.

Among the attackers are Jeremy Corbyn, leader of the UK’s Labour Pary and a member of Parliament (2:02 mark in video below), and Gary McFarlane, leader of Black Lives Matter UK (3:12 mark).
Corbyn has called for the UK government to bar President Trump from visiting the UK because of his executive order banning visitors from certain majority-Muslim countries from entering the US.

Let me see if I have this right —
People who call themselves “Progressives” act like regressive street thugs, attacking and calling a man “Nazi scum” for holding a sign defending the right to free speech and the open discussion of ideas.
Yet another case of the Left’s psychological projection and rank vileness.
Just imagine what these people would do to you if they attain and wield total power.
~Eowyn

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Two men fight on Southwest plane, as other passengers flee

More “Fly the Nightmare Skies”….
On May 7, 2017, as Southwest flight 2530 was taxiing to a terminal at Hollywood Burbank Airport for a layover, two young black men started punching each other, as other passengers seated nearby flee from the melee, while a woman can be heard screaming: “What’s wrong with you?”.
Flight 2530 to Oakland, CA, had originated in Dallas, Texas.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0zD2OJZr2Zw
The Los Angeles Times reports that according to Burbank Police Department’s Sgt. Derek Green, officers arrested Chaz Cable, a 37-year-old Lancaster man, for misdemeanor battery. Cable is currently being held in lieu of $50,000 bail.
The airline issued a statement that three people were involved in the fight rather than two, and that “We’re grateful to our employees who quickly reacted to break up a fight involving three customers. One customer had minor injuries, but was able to travel onward. We have no other reports of injuries.”
It’s unknown who the other two people involved with the fight are or how it started.

See also:

~Eowyn

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Two men fight in plane; stewardess choked


More fly the nightmare skies.

At around 6 p.m. on May 1, 2017, just before an All Nippon Airways (ANA) flight was about to depart from Narita International Airport to Los Angeles, two men started a brawl as other horrified passengers looked on and a desperate stewardess tried to pull them apart before being “choked” by one of the brawlers.

A passenger, Corey Hour, took this cell phone video of the fight, which appears to show the man in the Hawaiian shirt was the aggressor.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aJfXRdp0i1o

The guy in the Hawaiian shirt yells “I will kill you!,” while someone in the cabin shouts, “Someone help! This guy is crazy,” as two female flight attendants try to break them up. Other passengers can be heard begging the two men to “please stop” as a baby cries in the background.

When Hawaiian shirt man walks away, the man in the black t-shirt shouts, “Get this guy off this plane!”

Just when the brawl appears to have stopped, Hawaiian shirt man charges back down the aisle and resumes throwing punches at the guy in black.

According to Japan Today, Corey Hour, who took the video, told the BBC that “The flight attendants actually got caught up in the mix and that’s when the video ends as I put my phone down and I actually got in the middle of everyone and confronted” Hawaiian shirt guy.

Hawaiian shirt guy is a 44-year-old American whose name has not been released. A member of the airport police told AFP that “The suspect, a U.S. citizen, was drunk and arrested after he injured [choked] an ANA official following the fight.”

The fight, as well as bad weather, forced ANA Flight 6 to delay the departure of the flight by one hour and 40 minutes.

H/t Daily Mail

~Eowyn

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