Category Archives: robots

TV interviews lifelike robot

This is our present, folks.

Imagine what robots will be in 20 years.

“This Morning With Phillip & Holly” is a British daytime television program broadcast on ITV.

Sophia is a humanoid robot developed by Hong Kong based company Hanson Robotics. Sophia was activated on February 14, 2016, and made her first public appearance at South by Southwest Festival (SXSW) in mid-March 2016 in Austin, Texas, United States. She is able to display more than 50 facial expressions.

Sophia has been covered by media around the globe and has participated in many high-profile interviews. In October 2017, Sophia became the first robot to receive citizenship of any country. In November 2017, Sophia became the first non-human to be given a United Nations title — the UN Development Program’s first ever Innovation Champion. Around January 2018. Sophia was upgraded with functional legs and the ability to walk.

Sophia can follow faces, sustain eye contact, and recognize individuals. Able to answer certain questions and to make simple conversations on predefined topics, Sophia is designed to get smarter over time.

David Hanson modeled Sophia after actress Audrey Hepburn, although to me, the robot more resembles the actress Jennifer Lawrence. Hanson designed Sophia to be a suitable companion for the elderly at nursing homes, or to help crowds at large events or parks. He hopes that the robot can ultimately interact with other humans sufficiently to gain social skills.

Hanson Robotcs also created nine other robot humanoids: Alice, Albert Einstein Hubo, BINA48, Han, Jules, Professor Einstein, Philip K. Dick Android, Zeno, and Joey Chaos.

See also “Dublin brothel offers Dolly the sex robot for $102/hr.

~Eowyn

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Moonbats at Berkeley hold vigil for robot that burst into flames

Vigil for a ROBOT/Photo from Twitter

From SF Gate: This story originally appeared on The Daily Californian.

Describing the robot as a “hero” and a “legend,” UC Berkeley students expressed their grief on Facebook as news of a fallen KiwiBot reached the campus community.

About 2 p.m. Friday, a KiwiBot — one of the more than 100 robots that deliver food throughout the campus and city — caught fire outside the Martin Luther King Jr. Student Union.

According to Sasha Iatsenia, head of product at Kiwi, the company is still working with UCPD to investigate the cause of the fire. Nothing like this has ever happened before, Iatsenia said.

UCPD could not be reached for comment as of press time.

Footage from the scene shows one person putting out the flames with a fire extinguisher. The fire drew a small crowd of curious onlookers, and videos of a slowly blackening KiwiBot were soon thereafter uploaded to Facebook’s Overheard at UC Berkeley page.

Garnering more than 300 reactions and more than 90 comments within an hour of uploading, the video of the robot in flames made waves on the page. Students have called for a moment of silence, suggesting finals week may have finally gotten to the robot as well.

While the KiwiBot may have been scorched, Iatsenia assured The Daily Californian that it was not delivering a meal when it caught fire — no one saw their order lost.

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Nightmare: Factory robot impales worker with steel spikes after malfunction

Horrific.

From The Sun: The 49-year-old, named as Mr. Zhou, was working on the night shift at a porcelain factory in Hunan province when he was struck by a falling robotic arm.

The accident resulted in him being impaled with foot long, half-inch thick metal rods, the People’s Daily reported.

He was first taken to a local hospital before he was transferred to the Xiangya Hospital of Central South University due to the severity of his injuries.

Six steel rods fixed on a steel plate pierced his right shoulder and chest, and four penetrated elsewhere in his body.

During the operation, doctors found that one of the rods missed an artery by just 0.1mm.

The rods also prevented doctors from carrying out X-rays before the operation.

“They were relatively big so there was no means of getting fitting the patient into the X-ray machine while the nails themselves could have caused interference with X-rays,” said Wu Panfeng, an associate professor of hand microsurgery.

Surgeons worked through the night to take out all of the rods in Mr. Zhou’s body.

His condition is now described as stable and he will undergo treatment and physiotherapy to assist his recovery, and he is already able to move his right arm.

Mr. Zhou was lucky not to suffer the same fate as American factory worker Wanda Holbrook. The maintenance technician was killed by rogue robot who had veered into the area she was working in and crushed her head.

The 57-year-old was inspecting machinery in an area where components were assembled when the robot “took Wanda by surprise, entering the section she was working in”, court documents filed at the time said.

In 2015, another car industry worker, this time in Germany, was also killed by a robot. The unnamed 22-year-old man was part of a team that was setting up the stationary robot at a Volkswagen plant when it grabbed and crushed him against a metal plate,

Last year, a construction worker miraculously survived after he was electrocuted, thrown from his workstation and then impaled through the anus by a four-foot steel bar.

DCG

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Actress Jodie Foster is much more comfortable with robots having guns as opposed to "emotional" human beings

jodie foster

Jodie Foster stars in a new movie, Hotel Artemis, which opened June 8. Time for her to make the promotional rounds and say stupid things.
About the movie, from Rotten Tomatoes:
“Set in riot-torn, near-future Los Angeles, HOTEL ARTEMIS is an original, high-octane action-thriller starring Jodie Foster as The Nurse, who runs a secret, members-only hospital for criminals. Jodie Foster is joined by an all-star cast that includes Sterling K. Brown, Sofia Boutella, Jeff Goldblum, Brian Tyree Henry, Jenny Slate, Zachary Quinto, Charlie Day, and Dave Bautista.”
The critics consensus:
“Hotel Artemis has a few flashes of wit and an intriguing cast, but mostly it’s just a serviceable chunk of slightly futuristic violence — which might be all its audience is looking for.”
Jodie is all in on gun control yet her movie contains A LOT of gun violence. Shocker, not.
She recently told IndieWire:
“The institution that’s probably made the most change in terms of gun violence is The Brady [Campaign],” she said, referring to the organization named for James Brady, the White House press secretary shot and paralyzed during the attempted assassination of Ronald Reagan assassination in 1981. (Notably, the convicted shooter John Hinckley, Jr. later said the shooting was an attempt to get Foster’s attention.)
Isn’t it possible that we all have that bit of insanity in us? That’s why I’m for gun control,” she said at the time. “Absolutely. Hunting, I get that – let’s protect hunting. But I don’t believe that people should have access to life-or-death situations at any emotional time in their life. I don’t really believe that a human being who feels [things] should have the option at their fingertips.
“I had a lot of thoughts in terms of the power of the instrument and why it’s so problematic that human beings should have an instrument of death at their fingertips so freely when we are emotional human beings,” Foster said. “I mean, I’d be much more comfortable having robots have them, but we are designed to have emotions that overflow and that are not guided by our heads … To have sentient beings that are completely and entirely guided by their emotions have the power to administer life or death using one kilowatt of energy in a nanosecond is just unfathomable with me.”
What could possibly go wrong with a robot having a gun? Remember the malfunctioning robot from Robocop? (Warning, the link to the video is very graphic and violent.)
Another Hollyweird movie I won’t be seeing.
h/t Breitbart
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Teens aren't meeting their dates in real life anymore

einstein
Well this is sad. Any wonder why more than a quarter of millennials say they would replace a human lover with a DROID?
Via NY Post: Children are happy to have online-only relationships without meeting in real life, a poll shows. One in ten say they keep things strictly digital with a friend and one in five say they would be willing to do so.
A third also spend time making pictures look perfect before posting them online, the Internet Matters survey shows. Almost half said that they always or often post images of themselves having a great time and 34 percent agreed they spent time making their images look perfect before posting.
The survey carried out by Internet Matters to highlight the importance of children building their digital resilience so they can cope independently with the ups and downs of growing up online.
Positively 41 percent of kids said they found it is easier to open up about their feelings online than face to face. And a quarter of children said they find it easier to find love on the internet – and once they do, seven out of 10 said they go online to chat with their boyfriend or girlfriend.
The new toolkits offer parents age-specific tips and an easy-to-follow video guide from psychologist and Internet Matters ambassador Dr. Linda Papadopoulos. Papadopoulos said: “These figures reveal just how much relationships have changed as a result of the internet and social media and how children are continually facing new challenges. First love has always been a minefield – and even more so in the digital age when it’s all about sharing your life online.
“With all the benefits this brings, there will be times that children need to be resilient against the bad stuff that happens.
“By building a child’s digital resilience, parents will not only help keep their child safe online but essentially empower them to navigate digital issues on their own.”
Carolyn Bunting, CEO of Internet Matters, said: “We found that the majority of children see the role the internet plays when they build relationships as a positive thing. The key thing is for parents to talk to their children, and our resources enable them to do more confidently.”
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Roomba will sell interior map of your home to highest bidder


Roomba is the name for disc-shaped robotic vacuum cleaners sold by iRobot beginning in September 2002. The little robot is equipped with sensors enabling it to change direction upon encountering obstacles, and to sense steep drops to keep it from falling down stairs.
Founded in 1990, iRobot actually began building bomb disposal robots for the U.S. Army before launching the world’s first “robovac” in 2002. The company sold off its military unit last year to focus on making Roomba for consumers, which claims as much as 88% of the U.S. robovac market. (Reuters)
Roomba ranges in price from $375 to the $899 WiFi-connected model 980.
To maximize efficiency, Roomba models manufactured in the last couple of years are equipped with mapping technology that measures — and stores — the dimensions of a room as well as distances between sofas, tables, lamps and other home furnishings. Now, iRobot plans to sell that data to smart home device manufacturers, turning the cute robot vacuum into a little spy.

Rhett Jones reports for Gizmodo, July 24, 2017:

“While it may seem like the information that a Roomba could gather is minimal, there’s a lot to be gleaned from the maps it’s constantly updating. It knows the floor plan of your home, the basic shape of everything on your floor, what areas require the most maintenance, and how often you require cleaning cycles, along with many other data points. And, according to Reuters, that data is the future of its business strategy:
“There’s an entire ecosystem of things and services that the smart home can deliver once you have a rich map of the home that the user has allowed to be shared,” said [iRobot CEO Colin] Angle. […]

Angle told Reuters that iRobot, which made Roomba compatible with Amazon’s Alexa voice assistant in March, could reach a deal to sell its maps to one or more of the Big Three in the next couple of years.
If a company like Amazon, for example, wanted to improve its Echo smart speaker, the Roomba’s mapping info could certainly help out. Spatial mapping could improve audio performance by taking advantage of the room’s acoustics. Do you have a large room that’s practically empty? Targeted furniture ads might be quite effective. The laser and camera sensors would paint a nice portrait for lighting needs that would factor into smart lights that adjust in real time. Smart AC units could better control airflow. And additional sensors added in the future would gather even more data from this live-in double agent.
And while Amazon seems like an obvious buyer—the kind that would pay huge money to shut out its competitors—don’t forget that Apple has its Siri speaker coming and it has a lot of catching up to do. The kind of data that iRobot is offering would give any developer a huge opportunity to fine tune the experience.
Maybe that doesn’t unnerve you, but it probably should. This is all part of the larger quest for a few major companies to hoover up every bit of data about you that they can. Now, they want to know all about your living space. Going through the iRobot terms of service, you can see just how much data is already being collected on a daily basis just by clicking like on a Facebook page or visiting a corporate website. And that data will likely be just as insecure tomorrow as it is today.
The question for iRobot and other manufacturers who are working with robovacs that use mapping is: Will users reject their product in favor of cheaper devices that offer more privacy? Angle doesn’t think that will be a problem. He tells Reuters that user data won’t be sold without permission and he thinks most people will want to take advantage of the greater functionality.
The iRobot Home app does clearly inform users that they are capable of turning off the cloud sharing functions on their Roomba. But the actual terms of service document is written in typically convoluted legal language. The privacy policy frames most data collection as something that will just make your device better and improve overall user experience. A section of the policy on sharing personal information with third parties bullet points out the situations in which iRobot could share this data.
At a glance it might seem like there’s only a narrow set of circumstances for third parties to get ahold of your info, but in reality, these guidelines give the company tons of freedom. It can share your data internally, with subsidiaries, third party vendors, and the government upon request. While a section about sharing data with third parties for marketing purposes specifies that the user must give consent, there’s this separate bullet point below that:
[We may share your personal information with] other parties in connection with any company transaction, such as a merger, sale of all or a portion of company assets or shares, reorganization, financing, change of control or acquisition of all or a portion of our business by another company or third party or in the event of bankruptcy or related or similar proceeding.
Depending on a court’s interpretation of that language, it would appear that your consent isn’t necessarily required if iRobot wanted to sell its user data in bulk to Apple. That doesn’t mean it would go forward with such a transaction without notifying users first.
Dyson, a high-end Roomba competitor, does a better job of giving users a quick breakdown of what’s in its privacy policy. But the particulars aren’t all that different than what iRobot sets out in its agreement. Dyson does promise to never “sell your personal information to anyone and only share it as outlined in this privacy policy or when you ask us to.” Of course, there’s still some wiggle room in there and Dyson also has agreements to interact with third party devices like the Amazon Echo.
[…] People will likely click “agree” to whatever terms are put in front of them. Hell, I never considered buying a Roomba until I started writing this article and thought about how much neater my apartment would be if I had one. Convenience trumps privacy every time. Just remember that the Roomba knows what room your child is in, it’s the one where it bumps into all the toys on the floor.

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~Eowyn

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Dublin brothel offers Dolly the sex robot for $102/hr.

Robots are replacing not just low-skilled fast-food workers, and predicted to replace high-skilled professionals like lawyers and doctors, robots are beginning to make inroads into prostitution as well.
Sex dolls have gone beyond inflatable dolls with open mouths, like these displayed, along with an Obama blow-up doll, the Asia Adult Expo on August 22, 2010 in Macau (see below).

Photo by Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images


Instead of the crude facsimiles at the Asia Adult Expo, sex dolls are becoming more and more lifelike — like “Passion Dolly,” a silicone robot sex doll that a brothel in Dublin, Ireland rents out for £80 (about $102) an hour or £40 (about $51) for half an hour.

Megan Hill reports for the UK tabloid The Sun, July 9, 2017, that “Passion Dolly” is lifesize android with blonde hair, massive 32E boobs, an hourglass figure and eerily lifelike facial features of blue eyes and pouty lips. Described as “Ireland’s most realistic sex doll”, Passion Dolly arrived at the Dublin brothel, operated by two East European sex workers, less than a month ago and dozens of men “have already had their way with her.”
An import from the U.S., Dolly weighs 112 lbs., has a metal skeleton covered in silicone which enables it to be bent and twisted, and responds to “vibrations” moving like a human. The brothel’s ad on an adult website reads:

“Are you wasting money paying for sex… or watching porn? Why not have the full pleasure of having sex with the most beautiful girl whenever you want and as many times as you want? Passion Dolly is an ultra-realistic sex doll for your pleasure. She is made of either TPE or medical silicone and has a metal skeleton as internal structure to allow you to bend and twist the doll’s torso, head, arms and legs to pose in any sexual position you please.”

When customers arrive they will find Dolly lying on a bed in a dimly lit room. Condoms and tissues are also provided.
The brothel’s owners said they’ve had “Dolly” for about a month and “have had dozens of visitors, mostly Irish men and ranging in all ages. Some of them are a bit lonely, a few have social problems interacting with women, while others have a fascination with dolls.”
There are currently five makers of sex robots worldwide, with prices ranging from £4,000 ($5,138) to more than £12,000 ($15,415) for a “deluxe” model.
In a recent report, the Foundation for Responsible Robotics said that android sex dolls will become increasingly common over the next 10 years, and that in 50 years, sex dolls will move, talk spontaneously and have facial expressions that look truly human.
Some scientists warn that although “pleasure-bots” could provide help for people who find it hard to have intimate relationships – like those in care homes, and people with dementia or disabilities — there is a danger that the sex robots could lead to a decrease in real human relationships and, by objectifying children and women, encourage abuse, rape and pedophilia. They also urge politicians and the public to consider and resolve the ethical issues that sex robots will pose to society and relationships.
Dr. Noel Sharkey, a professor of artificial intelligence and robotics at the University of Sheffield in England, and Dr. Aimee van Wynsberghe, assistant professor in ethics and technology at a Dutch university, said governments need to introduce legislation to stop abuses of this technology. In particular, Professor Sharkey urges government to take preëmptive action against pedophile sex robots by banning their import into the UK.
A recent U.S. survey of 100 people found that two-thirds of males and a third of women aged 20-61 said they would have sex with a robot.
I wonder if, after they’re done, the men and women who had sex with a robot gaze down at the inanimate object they’d used and feel any shame that they have degraded and dehumanized themselves?
Readers’ comments on The Sun‘s Dolly article certainly confirm the survey’s findings, like the cynical comments by Hyon Kim and Gary Ferraro, which both received 4 “likes”:

“The doll cleans up better than the average girl you meet at the Pub.”
“At least it’s a cheaper date compared to dating a real woman at least 3-5 times before she gives up the honey pot. No mind games, no problems. You’re still not guaranteed any snatch after spending a fortune on an air headed real girl.”

Reader Dave Rankine has the best and wisest comment:

This is why future robots will kill us.


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~Eowyn

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Minimum wage hikes hasten replacement of human workers by robots

Robotics is developing in such leaps and bounds that the replacement of low-skilled human workers by robots is inevitable. But the political , i.e., non-market forces, push for and resultant increases in the minimum wage are hastening that replacement — and it’s already happening.

Demonstrators for minimum-wage increase

Demonstrators for minimum-wage increase


Stephen Frank of California Political Review reports, May 15, 2016:

[T]he fast food industry is going to end the hiring of humans. In California there is a McDonalds that is using a robot to make up to 360 burgers and hour—and kiosks to take orders and payment. Jobs for teens are in danger. Now Wendy’s, in 6,000 stores will fire cashiers and “hire” kiosks to do the job of taking orders and payment. This starts before the end of THIS year—the next step are the robots making the food.

You see, an increase in minimum wage to $15/hour is actually more than that to the employer, when one adds health care coverage, Social Security unemployment insurance, and other costs. That means, according to one calculation I’ve seen, a $15/hour low-skilled (and too often surly) worker like in the fast-food industry actually costs the employer $40,000 a year.
Jessica Haworth reports for the UK Mirror, May 25, 2016, that former McDonald’s CEO Ed Rensi warned that huge job losses are imminent because robots will take over staff jobs at the fast food empire. He said the reason is “common sense” — buying highly skilled robots, while expensive in the short term, is a cheaper alternative than employing people on minimum wage to work in the company’s worldwide restaurants. Rensi explains:

“I was at the National Restaurant Show yesterday and if you look at the robotic devices that are coming into the restaurant industry. It’s cheaper to buy a $35,000…robotic arm than it is to hire an employee who’s inefficient making $15…an hour bagging French fries. It’s nonsense and it’s very destructive and it’s inflationary and it’s going to cause a job loss across this country like you’re not going to believe. It’s not just going to be in the fast food business. Franchising is the best business model in the United States. It’s dependent on people that have low job skills that have to grow. Well if you can’t get people a reasonable wage, you’re going to get machines to do the work. It’s just common sense. It’s going to happen whether you like it or not. And the more you push this it’s going to happen faster.

Predictably, a McDonald’s UK spokesperson denies it: “The suggestion that McDonald’s is planning to replace employees with robots is completely untrue. Our staff are vital to our business and in the UK alone we employ over 110,000 people who serve 3.7m customers every day.”
McDonald’s denial notwithstanding, the fact is that Pizza Hut has already recruited a fleet of walking, talking humanoid robots to take orders and process payments. One of them is Pepper, the humanoid robot made by Japanese technology firm SoftBank, which has already been used by Nestlé to sell coffee machines. Pepper can read and respond to human gestures, expressions and tone of voice, allowing customers to communicate with the robot “just like they would with friends and family”.

Pizza Hut's Pepper robot

Pizza Hut’s Pepper robot


Pizza Hut said that it plans to have Pepper robots working as waiters in its restaurants in Asia by the end of 2016, to take orders and engage with customers. Vipul Chawla, managing director of Pizza Hut Restaurants Asia, said, “We are excited to welcome Pepper to the Pizza Hut family. With an order-and-payment-enabled Pepper, customers can now come to expect personalised ordering at our stores, reduce wait time for takeaways, and have a fun, frictionless user experience.

Note: After a very unpleasant experience with the local branch manager at my husband’s Citibank, with which he has done business for decades, I discovered that I was able to do everything online any way. I will never set foot in that bank again and will begin the process of taking all our money from Citibank and move it elsewhere.

While the low-skill fast-food industry is leading the way of robots replacing humans, this is just the beginning.
A new study, by London Business School professor of management practice Lynda Gratton and futurologist David A. Smith, into the future of human employment is predicting a surge in machine-led work into higher-skilled occupations such as robotic counsellors, body part makers and virtual lawyers. Even lawyers, doctors and accountants may be redundant in 20 years after their jobs are taken over by robots. Gratton and Smith also analyzed work that will be critical for the future — in communications, robotics, space, environment and medicine — and concluded that they will be more efficient and successful if undertaken by machine.
The reason in the case of middle- and high-skilled work is not labor cost, but efficiency: robots are able to produce better results. As futurologist Smith explains: “In fields such as law, accountancy and medicine, machines are likely to produce generally better answers than humans.”
Prof Gratton advises:

“Studies have suggested that a third of jobs in Europe will be replaced by technology over the next two decades. As middle-skilled roles disappear, workers may find that the ‘rung’ above them no longer exists, and that the career ladder may begin to look more like a career web. The ultimate implication is that workers cannot now expect to gain seniority by moving ‘up’, but rather moving sideways by gaining additional complex skills.

What America and other countries will do with the MILLIONS of low-skilled people displaced by robots is anyone’s guess.

robot delivers food in hospital ward

Robot delivers food in hospital ward


H/t FOTM‘s Anonymous
~Eowyn

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Protestors soon to be unemployed: Super-cool robots are taking over jobs

Pretty soon the “Fight for $15” crowd will be fighting just to find a job.

Domino's new trial pizza delivery robot in New Zealand is just under a metre (three foot) high and contains a heated compartment that can hold up to 10 pizzas. (AFP Photo/)

Domino’s new trial pizza delivery robot in New Zealand is just under a metre (three foot) high and contains a heated compartment that can hold up to 10 pizzas. (AFP Photo/)


Via SF Gate: Domino’s announced last Friday it’s testing a pizza deliveryman robot in New Zealand with a four-wheeled, short and squat droid who looks like a cross between a Wall-E and an R2D2. At the same time, Carl’s Jr. CEO Andy Pudzer told Business Insider this week he wants to build a fully-automated restaurant.
What’s more, Google is in the news  for sending a letter to U.S. transportation officials saying it should be legal to market and sell self-driving cars if they can pass standardized federal safety tests. Once this all gets sorted out, Uber, Lyft and taxi car drivers will be out of jobs.
A robot is any machine capable of carrying out a complex series of actions and typically programmable by a computer—and we’re increasingly seeing these high-tech machines replacing jobs once performed by humans. At the airport ticket counter, at the grocery store checkout line and at the bridge tool booth, we’re less frequently looking a human in the eye when we hand over our money. Instead, we’re dealing with a computer.
At the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Washington, D.C., in February, Professor Moshe Vardi said robots will take over most jobs in 30 years, the British Telegraph reported. “We are approaching a time when machines will be able to outperform humans at almost any task,” said Vardi, a professor in computational engineering at Rice University.
He added: “Robots are doing more and more jobs that people used to do. Pharmacists, prison guards, boning chicken, bartending, more and more jobs we’re able to mechanize them.”
The high-tech world is even finding ways to use computers to do jobs that seem as if they’d require a human mind. The LA Times uses what’s known as QuakeBot to quickly write and publish news about recent earthquakes.
Businesses are turning to robots because they can save money.  Carl’s Jr.’s Pudzer said he’s investing in the automated restaurants because minimum wages continue to go up across the country.
“With government driving up the cost of labor, it’s driving down the number of jobs,” he told Business Insider. “You’re going to see automation not just in airports and grocery stores, but in restaurants.”
But as technology advances and swallows up an increasing number of jobs, some question whether the bottom line should only be about money. What about the loss of jobs? And the overall loss of human connection? Research shows that people benefit from social interactions and can happen at the grocery store, at the bank, at the library when there’s an actual person behind the counter or at the cash register.
At the Advancement of Science conference Professor Vardi posted a profound question: “Does the technology we are developing ultimately benefit mankind?”
See the gallery of some super-high-tech robots replacing jobs at the SF Gate web site here.
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