Category Archives: Saints

Sunday Devotional: Season of Lent begins

Genesis 2:7-9, 3:1-7

The LORD God formed man out of the clay of the ground
and blew into his nostrils the breath of life,
and so man became a living being.

Then the LORD God planted a garden in Eden, in the east,
and placed there the man whom he had formed.
Out of the ground the LORD God made various trees grow
that were delightful to look at and good for food,
with the tree of life in the middle of the garden
and the tree of the knowledge of good and evil.

Now the serpent was the most cunning of all the animals
that the LORD God had made.
The serpent asked the woman,
“Did God really tell you not to eat
from any of the trees in the garden?”
The woman answered the serpent:
“We may eat of the fruit of the trees in the garden;
it is only about the fruit of the tree
in the middle of the garden that God said,
‘You shall not eat it or even touch it, lest you die.'”
But the serpent said to the woman:
“You certainly will not die!
No, God knows well that the moment you eat of it
your eyes will be opened and you will be like gods
who know what is good and what is evil.”
The woman saw that the tree was good for food,
pleasing to the eyes, and desirable for gaining wisdom.
So she took some of its fruit and ate it;
and she also gave some to her husband, who was with her,
and he ate it.
Then the eyes of both of them were opened,
and they realized that they were naked;
so they sewed fig leaves together
and made loincloths for themselves.

Michelangelo's Temptation and Fall

The Fall of Adam and Eve is a mystery wrapped in a conundrum. For, having everything in that bucolic first garden, including and especially the unimaginably sublime gift of seeing and conversing with the Creator (Then the man and his wife heard the sound of the Lord God as he was walking in the garden in the cool of the day” –Genesis 3:8), they still chose disobedience and betrayal.

All because of the sin of grandiose narcissism — of wanting to be “like gods,” who will determine for themselves “what is good and what is evil” although they already knew right from wrong for, as the Book of Jeremiah 31:33 says, when God created humans, He placed His law within each of us, written in our very hearts.

But our first parents wanted to be their own gods, that is, with their own conception of right and wrong. And that is nothing other than a contravention of the First Commandment (“You shall have no other gods before me.” –Exodus 20:3). Another way to say “wanting to be their own gods” is “Do as thou wilt” — the motto of satanist Aleister Crowley and the church of Satan, and the zeitgeist of our time.

That first sin by our first parents was so cataclysmic that it fundamentally changed the natural order of the world.

A door was opened to chaos; henceforth a price must be paid for being human. Where once was joy and ease, there would be banishment, toil, pain, hardship, sickness, disease, and eventual death (“with painful labor you will give birth to children“; “by the sweat of your brow”; “for dust you are and to dust you will return”). Humankind’s relation with other creatures and the physical environment turned askew as “visible creation has become alien and hostile to man.” 

So cataclysmic is the breach that human nature itself became perverted. Henceforth, all of Adam’s progeny would be born “tinder for sin” (fomes peccati) with the stain of Original Sin, an inclination to evil. As St. Anselm lamented¹:

“I fell before my mother conceived me. Truly, in darkness I was conceived, and in the cover of darkness I was born. Truly, in him we all fell, in whom we all sinned. In him we all lost.”

¹St. Anselm: Basic Writings, translated by S. N. Deane (La Salle, Illinois: Open Court, 1961), p. 24.

So immense was our first parents’ Fall that only God Himself, in the person of the Son, could make amends — by becoming incarnate, only to be tortured, to suffer, and to die on a cross.

Jesus loves us this much

And so we come to Lent.

Since Jesus prepared Himself for His public ministry in 40 days, Christians imitate Him with prayer and fasting during this time of Lent to prepare for Holy Week. In remembrance of how Christ our Lord was tortured, suffered, and died for our sins, we are asked to make a sacrifice during Lent by surrendering something that gives us pleasure, and/or by doing something good that we don’t ordinarily do.

For Lent, I’m giving up chocolates. What are you giving up for Lent?

And may the love and peace of Jesus Christ our Lord be with you, always,

~Éowyn

Advertisements

Tomb of Christ in Church of Holy Sepulchre surrounded by electromagnetic field

Source: Wikipedia

Source: Wikipedia

The Church of the Holy Sepulchre is a church, built in the 4th century, in the Christian Quarter of the Old City of Jerusalem. According to traditions, the church occupies two of the holiest sites of Christianity:

  1. Where Jesus was crucified (“Calvary” or “Golgotha”).
  2. Jesus’s empty tomb, where His Body was placed and resurrected. The tomb is enclosed by an 18th-century shrine called the Edicule.

Within the church proper are the last four (or, by some definitions, five) Stations of the Via Dolorosa, representing the final episodes of Jesus’ Passion. The church has been a major Christian pilgrimage destination since its creation in the fourth century, as the traditional site of the Resurrection of Christ, thus its original Greek name, Church of the Anastasis or Resurrection.

In 2016, restoration works were performed in the Edicule, the shrine that encloses Jesus’ tomb.

For the first time since at least 1555, marble cladding which protected the estimated burial bed of Jesus from vandalism and souvenir takers was removed. On the night of October 28, 2016, the original limestone burial bed was revealed intact. The tomb was resealed shortly thereafter.

The Edicule encasing the Tomb of Christ, in the Church of the Holy Sepulchre

The Edicule encasing the Tomb of Christ, in the Church of the Holy Sepulchre

What that’s received very little publicity are two discoveries of the scientists who undertook the restoration work on the Edicule.

As recounted by Sylvain Dorient for Aleteia, Nov. 15, 2016:

On October 26, 27 and 28, 2016, the marble slab that covers the tomb of Christ was removed. As the group of scientists and religious authorities had access to the place, rumors immediately began to run around. Some rumors claimed it was possible to perceive a “sweet aroma” emanating from the tomb, reminiscent of the olfactory manifestations commonly associated with both Marian and saintly apparitions. Secondly, it was alleged that some of the measuring instruments used by scientists were altered by electromagnetic disturbances. As soon as they were placed vertically on the stone in which Christ’s body rested, the devices either malfunctioned or ceased to work at all. […]

The [electromagnetic] phenomenon was confirmed by one of the scientists authorized to access the tomb. Later, one of the heads of the building and construction team, Antonia Moropoulou, indicated that it is really hard to imagine that someone would be willing to put in danger his or her reputation just because of a “publicity stunt.”

Antonia Moropoulou is the Vice Rector of Academic Affairs of the National Technical University of Athens (NTUA), and a Chemical Engineer, Dr., and Professor at NTUA’s School of Chemical Engineering.

Dorient noted that during the last partial opening of the Edicule made by the architect Nikolaos Komnenos in 1809, the chronicler also made mention of a “sweet aroma” — the “scent of sanctity” that often accompanies Marian apparitions and the tombs of some saints.

On the electromagnetic disturbance experienced by the scientists, uCatholic writes:

The observation of these unusual electromagnetic anomalies at the tomb of Jesus may lend credence to a scientific hypothesis on the creation of the ghostly image on the Shroud of Turin. Italy’s National Agency for New Technologies, Energy and Sustainable Economic Development [ENEA] concluded during a five-year-long study that the Shroud of Turin could not be a ‘medieval fake’. The findings of ENEA study hypothesized that the image may have been created by an intense source of light, stronger than could be created by any technology currently available to man. The results of ENEA “show that a short and intense burst of VUV directional radiation can color a linen cloth so as to reproduce many of the peculiar characteristics of the body image on the Shroud of Turin, including shades of color, the surface color of the fibrils of the outer linen fabric, and the absence of fluorescence”. . . . But “the total power of VUV radiations required to instantly color the surface of linen that corresponds to a human of average height, body surface area equal to = 2000 MW/cm2 17000 cm2 = 34 thousand billion watts makes it impractical today to reproduce the entire Shroud image using a single laser excimer, since this power cannot be produced by any VUV light source built to date (the most powerful available on the market come to several billion watts )”.

“An intense source of light, stronger than could be created by any technology currently available to man” . . . “a short and intense burst of VUV directional radiation” . . . .

VUV is vacuum ultra-violet, a type of electromagnetic radiation.

Imagine how powerful the radiation burst of the Resurrection must have been to leave electromagnetic traces after more than 2,000 years — traces that were detected by those scientists restoring the Edicule in the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in the Year of Our Lord 2016.

~Eowyn

82-year-old bisexual trolls Tinder for sex

Tinder is a mobile app that facilitates communication between mutually interested users, allowing matched users to chat. The app is most commonly used as a dating app or for hookups — casual sex without relationships. That, in turn, has led to an uptick of sexually transmitted diseases (STD) from use of Tinder and similar apps.

See DCG’s post of January 23, 2016, “Tinder adds health section after AIDS charity put up billboards linking dating app to chlamydia and gonorrhea“.

Yesterday was Valentine’s Day, which is named after Saint Valentine — a priest who, in the second half of the 3rd century, was arrested and killed by the Roman Emperor Claudius for secretly marrying Christian couples during a time of persecution in the Church. Legend has it that while he was imprisoned and waiting for his martyrdom, he sent letters to his fellow Christians signing them, “From Your Valentine.” (See “St. Valentine“ and “Valentine’s Day and the meaning of true love“)

New York Post chose to celebrate Valentine’s Day with a revolting article on an 82-year-old New York woman who calls herself an actress/singer/songwriter named D’yan Forest (almost certainly a stage name), and uses Tinder to look for casual sex with men and women.

dyan-forest

Alexandra Klausner reports for New York Post, Feb. 14, 2017, that the 82-year-old singer-songwriter from New York City “is looking for a good time.”

D’yan Forest says that while many of her friends have given up on sex, she’ll never stop craving “intimacy”. She told The Post with a chuckle, “It ain’t over ’til the fat lady’s dead”.

The octogenarian, who identifies as bisexual, sings about checking out the boys and girls on Tinder with song lyrics like, “I like a schlong that’s hard, or a snatch that’s ginger.”

She says her desire to date is greater than ever: “My friends who sit home with their old husbands or whatever, and watch television, they don’t want sex anymore. And I think it’s because they’re bored to death! The older men my age don’t really interest me. They don’t think a woman is equal.” It’s younger men who excite her but the sex-crazed octogenarian laments she’s too old to attract them: “It’s rough and I would love to have sex. I’m not giving up hope. I’m just as vibrant emotionally, intellectually, sexually as I was in my 20s and 30s.”

Forest says she plans to go to meetups so that she can meet new people who share her interests, “I sometimes go out in the evenings, to a bar or a local place, where you sit around and talk.”

Forest was married soon after graduating from Middlebury College, where she was the only Jewish student, and stayed with her husband for four years. She told Lilith: “I was a stupid virgin when I met him. If I had fooled around before marriage, I would have known not to marry him.”

dyan-forest2

~Eowyn

Valentine’s Day and the meaning of true love

Today is Valentine’s Day — the day when TV commercials nag men to buy roses, candy, and jewelry for their wives or girl friends.

But did you know that the day is named after a real person, St. Valentine?

At least three different Saint Valentines, all of them martyrs, are mentioned in the early martyrologies under the date of February 14th. But the man for whom Valentine’s Day is named most likely was a priest at Rome who, in the second half of the 3rd century, was arrested and killed by the Emperor Claudius for secretly marrying Christian couples during a time of persecution in the Church. Legend has it that while he was imprisoned and waiting for his martyrdom, he sent letters to his fellow Christians signing them, “From Your Valentine.” (See joandarc’s post, “St. Valentine“)

The popular customs associated with Valentine’s Day probably came from a conventional belief in England and France during the Middle Ages, that on 14 February, i.e. half way through the second month of the year, the birds began to pair. Thus in Chaucer’s Parliament of Foules we read:

For this was sent on Seynt Valentyne’s day
Whan every foul cometh ther to choose his mate.

For this reason the day was looked upon as specially consecrated to lovers and as a proper occasion for writing love letters and sending lovers’ tokens. [Source: Catholic Encyclopedia]

So what is love?

I can find no better definition and description of true love than the words of St. Paul:

1 Corinthians 13:4-7

Love is patient, love is kind.
It is not jealous, it is not pompous,
It is not inflated, it is not rude,
it does not seek its own interests,
it is not quick-tempered,
it does not brood over injury,

it does not rejoice over wrongdoing
but rejoices with the truth.
It bears all things, believes all things,
hopes all things, endures all things.

And here’s the true meaning of Valentine’s Day:

God's Valentine to us John 3-16

The Greatest Commandment of all is to love God with your whole heart, your whole mind, your whole soul, and with all your strength; and to love your neighbor as you love yourself.

May the love of our Lord Jesus Christ be with you today!

~Eowyn

St. Valentine

St Valentine

Did you know that there is indeed a history to the celebration of Valentine’s Day?  From the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops website (usccb.org):

“Today is the feast day of St. Valentine.  Did you know St. Valentine was a real person?  Well, actually there are at least 2 St. Valentines in the ancient martyrology of the Church.  While very little is known about Valentine of Rome and Valentine of Terni, we do know that Pope Gelasius declared February 14th his feast day in 496.  He is the patron saint of happy marriages, engaged couples and young people….

It is believed that Valentine was a priest arrested by the Emperor Claudius for marrying Christian couples secretly during a time of persecution in the Church.  Legend has it that while he was imprisoned and waiting for his martyrdom, he sent letters to his fellow Christians signing them, “From Your Valentine.”

Matthew Bunson, an apologist at EWTN (Eternal Word Television Network), tells us that not only was St. Valentine a Roman priest and martyr, executed on February 14th, but that he was also a physician, that he was probably flogged and/or beheaded and that he was buried on the Via Flaminia, with a basilica erected on the spot where he was buried in the year 350.  However, there is mention of another Valentine who was the bishop of Terni near Riome, although these two Valentines may be the same individual.

Going back to the tradition of sending missives, the Catholic Encyclopedia provides us with a history of this practice:

“The popular customs associated with Saint Valentine’s Day undoubtedly had their origin in a conventional belief generally received in England and France during the Middle Ages, that on 14 February, i.e. half way through the second month of the year, the birds began to pair.  Thus, in Chaucer’s Parliament of Foules we read: ‘For this was sent on Seynt Valentyne’s day whan every foul cometh ther to choose his mate.’  For this reason the day was looked upon as specially consecrated to lovers and as a proper occasion for writing love letters and sending lovers’ tokens.  Both the French and English literatures of the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries contain allusions to the practice.”

We know for sure that St. Valentine was a martyr and that he gave his life for Jesus with great love and loyalty.  Could we be that brave as to give our lives for our Faith, for Jesus?  I have asked myself that question and I believe that because I am such a determined and stubborn individual, and because I love Jesus so much, that I would be able to do so, although I would need unending help from Him.  Accordingly, it is most appropriate to concentrate on the Gospel today from St. Luke 9:22-25:

Jesus said to His disciples:

“The Son of Man must suffer greatly and be rejected by the elders, the chief priests, and the scribes, and be killed and on the third day be raised.”

Then he said to all, “If anyone wishes to come after me, he must deny himself and take up his cross daily and follow me.  For whoever wishes to save his life will lose it, but whoever loses his life for my sake will save it.  What profit is there for one to gain the whole world yet lose or forfeit himself?”

Happy St. Valentine’s Day!

With love and respect,

Joan

Sources:

Usccb.org (United States Conference of Catholic Bishops); ewtn.com (Eternal Word Television Network)

St. Thomas Aquinas disapproved of illegal immigration and expected all immigrants to assimilate

January 28 was the feast day of St. Thomas Aquinas, whose nickname was “the dumb Sicilian ox,” because he was stout in body and slow in manner.

But the mind of St. Thomas was nothing but slow. Not only was he a superb theologian, but — without exaggeration — Aquinas is one of the greatest minds in human history. Just read a piece of his writings, and you’ll see how he reasoned with step-by-step unassailable logic.

That is why the Catholic Church not only honors him as a Doctor of the Church, but considers Thomas to be the Church’s greatest theologian and philosopher. The Church should remember that as so many of its clerics in the United States (and Pope Francis too) weigh in — on the wrong side — on the issue of illegal immigration. See “U.S. bishops oppose President Trump on border wall and illegal immigrants”.

Here are some quotes from St. Thomas on the subject of immigration, which show that St. Thomas respected a country’s laws governing immigration and so would gravely disapprove of illegal “immigrants,” much less their brazen demands for special treatment in the U.S. today.

Even in the case of legal immigrants, St. Thomas expected them to fully assimilate themselves into the country’s culture. So prudent and concerned was he for the wellbeing for the host country that he recommended that even legal immigrants be granted citizenship only after 2 or 3 generations:

“Man’s relations with foreigners are twofold: peaceful, and hostile: and in directing both kinds of relation the Law contained suitable precepts.”

“…when any foreigners wished to be admitted entirely to their fellowship and mode of worship. With regard to these a certain order was observed. For they were not at once admitted to citizenship: just as it was law with some nations that no one was deemed a citizen except after two or three generations, as the Philosopher says (Polit. iii, 1).”

“The reason for this was that if foreigners were allowed to meddle with the affairs of a nation as soon as they settled down in its midst, many dangers might occur, since the foreigners not yet having the common good firmly at heart might attempt something hurtful to the people.

Read more about St. Thomas Aquinas on the subject of immigration, here.

Below is joandarc’s original post on St. Thomas, which she published several years ago.

~Eowyn

St. Thomas Aquinas

Today, January 28th, we celebrate one of the most illustrious and influential Saints of the Catholic Church, St. Thomas Aquinas.

Thomas Aquinas is by far, the spokesman of the Catholic tradition of reason and divine revelation, being one of the greatest teachers of the Catholic Church, which is why he is named a Doctor of the Church and the Angelic Doctor.

Thomas was born in or about 1225, the youngest of four sons, in the castle of Rocca Secca, to Landulf, a knight, and to Theodora, his mother of Norman descent. At the age of five, his parents took him to the Benedictine Monastery at Monte Cassino, hoping that he would join this Order and rise to the position of abbot. In 1239, he went to the University of Naples in Italy, to study the arts and sciences, and it was through this experience that he became interested in Aristotle.

In or about 1243, Thomas joined the Dominicans, which was against his family’s desires. In fact, his mother ordered that his brothers capture Thomas. Accordingly, they did so and he actually remained at his home, wherein his family hoped to change his mind. You might say that he was put under “house arrest” because of his defiance. While he was imprisoned, he studied the Sentences of Peter Lombard and learned by heart a great portion of the Bible.

After two years, his family gave up and allowed Thomas to go back to his Order of the Dominicans. Thomas then went to Cologne, finishing his studies under St. Albert the Great. Thomas, being reserved and a humble man, was not very well liked by his colleagues. He was a large man, receiving the nickname of “the dumb Sicilian ox.” However, St. Albert, his professor, said this of Thomas, “We call Brother Thomas the ‘dumb ox’; but I tell you that he will yet make his lowing heard to the uttermost parts of the earth.” Thomas’ brilliance was exceeded by his piety, and after he had been ordained a priest, he became so very close and united with God.

In or about 1252, St. Albert and Cardinal Hugh of Saint-Cher insisted that Thomas go to the University of Paris to teach. Four years thereafter, he became a master and received his doctors chair. His duties included lecturing and preaching.

In or about 1259 to 1268, he was made Preacher General in Italy and taught in the school of selected scholars attached to the papal court, teaching also in other towns and cities in Italy.

His writings created harmony between faith and reason, between divine revelation and natural human knowledge. But Thomas was so in-depth a thinker and lover of God, that he was able to merge the two in his writings, seeing the whole natural order as coming from God, the Creator, and seeing reason as a gift from God to be used for His honor and glory. He wrote the Summa contra Gentiles, a textbook for missionaries, a defense of natural theology against the Arabians, and the Summa theologiae, setting forth Catholic theology with faith and reason. And he wrote about the Angels of God using logic, wisdom and the Bible, which is why he is called, “the Angelic Doctor.”

In 1269, he went back to Paris, wherein St. Louis IX consulted him regularly with regard to important matters of state, as the king so respected Thomas. But the university referred an issue to him, a question upon which they were divided, whether in the Blessed Sacrament of the altar the accidents remained really or only in appearance. St. Thomas prayed fervently and with great love asked for direction from God. He wrote a treatise and laid it upon the altar before he submitted his answer publicly. Our Lord then appeared to St. Thomas saying to him, “Thou has written well of the Sacrament of My Body,” asking Thomas what He could give him as a reward. Thomas said, “I want only You, Lord, only You.” Oftentimes during Mass, especially during the Consecration of the bread and wine into the Body and Blood of Jesus, Thomas would cry, sobbing, being so touched of his role as a priest, and of the precious love of Jesus, knowing that he was in the Real Presence of the Second Person of the Blessed Trinity.

In or about 1272, Thomas was called back to Italy, being appointed regent of the study house at Naples. On the Feast of St. Nicholas the following year, he was celebrating Holy Mass, wherein he received a revelation that affected him so, that he did not write or dictate anymore, leaving the magnificent work of the Summa theologiae, unfinished. Thomas told Brother Reginald, “The end of my labors is come. All that I have written appears to be as so much straw after the things that have been revealed to me.”

Pope Gregory bid Thomas, although ill, to attend the general council at Lyons for the reunion of the Greek and Latin churches and to bring with him his work, “Against the Errors of the Greeks.” He became worse during his journey and was consequently taken to the Cistercian abbey of Fossa Nuova. He was lodged in the abbot’s room and the monks attended to him. After Thomas made his last confession receiving the Holy Eucharist from the abbot, he stated these famous words:

“I am receiving thee, Price of my soul’s redemption: all my studies, my vigils and my labors have been for love of thee. I have taught much and written much of the most sacred body of Jesus Christ; I have taught and written in the faith of Jesus Christ and of the holy Roman Church, to whose judgment I offer and submit everything.” Two days later, March 7, 1274, being about 50 years of age, he died. St. Albert who was in Cologne, burst into tears in front of his community and said, “Brother Thomas Aquinas, my son in Christ, the light of the Church, is dead. God has revealed it to me.”

St. Thomas was canonized in 1323, wherein his body lies in the cathedral of Saint-Sernin. St. Pius V conferred upon him the title of Doctor of the Church, and in 1880, Leo XIII declared him the patron saint of universities, colleges and schools.

Thomas’ theological and philosophical writings fill twenty thick volumes and he was the first to comment on Aristotle, whose teaching he utilized in order to build up a complete system of Christian philosophy. Indeed, his most important work was the Summa theologiae, the most thorough and full exposition of theological teaching ever given to the world. This work was one of the three reference works used at the Council of Trent, the other two being the Bible and Pontifical Decrees.

His achievements were not just attributed to his incredible writings. When Pope Urban IV, influenced by the visions of Blessed Juliana of Liege, decided to institute the Feast of Corpus Christi, he deferred to St. Thomas to compose the liturgical office and the Mass for the day, wherein Thomas showed his remarkable expression, known for doctrinal accuracy as for their tenderness of thought. Famous hymns, Pange lingua, O salutaris and Tantum ergo, written by Thomas, are regularly sung at Benediction.

In spite of his greatness, he thought the best of others, thinking they were better than him, being extremely modest whilst he stated his opinion. He did not lose his temper in an argument and was extremely poised.

St. Thomas Aquinas has always been one of my favorite saints. Whilst I was in high school studying philosophy, I would take books home containing his writings. I was drawn to these books, so I did not go out with my friends because I would rather stay home with St. Thomas and read what he said in my cozy bedroom. In fact, though they were kidding, my friends called me a “wallflower” because of my devotion to St. Thomas. I would laugh and tell them that they did not know what they were missing, and that at some point, they might understand. . .

It is my childlike vision in my mind’s eye that sees a great celebration in Heaven today for our dear and great St. Thomas Aquinas! We love and respect you! We hope to some day be with you in Our Lord’s heaven, and maybe you can teach us there too! God be praised for this great and holy man!

With respect and love,

Joan

Sources:

  • One Hundred Saints, Bulfinch Press.
  • Saint of the Day, Edited by Leonard Foley, O.F.M.
  • Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church, Edited by F.L. Cross.
  • Read more about St. Thomas Aquinas on Wikipedia.

Sunday Devotional: Giving thanks for the election

Isaiah 8:6-7, 10, 23; 9:1-3

Because this people has rejected
the waters of Shiloah that flow gently…
Therefore the Lord is bringing up against them
the waters of the River, great and mighty….
Form a plan, it shall be thwarted;
make a resolve, it shall not be carried out,
for “With us is God!”….

Anguish has taken wing, dispelled is darkness:
for there is no gloom where but now there was distress.
The people who walked in darkness
have seen a great light;
upon those who dwelt in the land of gloom
a light has shone.
You have brought them abundant joy
and great rejoicing,
as they rejoice before you as at the harvest,
as people make merry when dividing spoils.
For the yoke that burdened them,
the pole on their shoulder,
and the rod of their taskmaster
you have smashed….

When the tides turned in the evening and early morning hours of last November 8-9, it became clear that Donald John Trump had defeated Hillary Clinton, despite the many polls predicting she would win. Everyone was surprised — not just her supporters, but also the millions who had voted for Trump. Several TV talking heads who are not Trump supporters used the word “miracle”.

St. Paul wrote in his letter to the Ephesians 6:12:

“For our struggle is not with flesh and blood
but with the principalities, with the powers,
with the world rulers of this present darkness,
with the evil spirits in the heavens.”

The 2016 presidential election was not just a political contest “with flesh and blood”. It was and remains a struggle “with the powers, with the world rulers of this present darkness, with the evil spirits in the heavens.”

If you doubt that, just look at these pics of the protesters in Washington, D.C., on the day of Trump’s presidential inauguration (source PJ Media):

demonic-inaugural-protesters2demonic-inaugural-protesters3demonic-inaugural-protesters

See also “Evidence that Hillary Clinton and her associates are satanists” and “Satanists endorse Bernie Sanders for President”.

Did you know that Trump’s inauguration set the record for most prayers at inaugural ceremonies?

Trump started the day at St. John’s Church for a service at 8:30 a.m. The inauguration ceremony had six religious prayers, three invocations and three benedictions.

Trump was sworn in using both his own Bible, gifted to him by his mother, and the Bible used to swear in President Abraham Lincoln. (McClatchy DC)

Inauguration Of Donald Trump As 45th President Of The United States

Trump began the day after his inauguration also with prayers, by attending an interfaith National Prayer Service at Washington National Cathedral. Prayers asking for divine help for Trump were offered by Christian (Catholic, Baptist, Episcopal), Jewish, Muslim, Hindu, Sikh, and Navajo clergy.  (Daily Mail)

It is reported that today, the 44th anniversary of Roe v. Wade, Trump will ban U.S. taxpayers’ funding of overseas pro-abortion groups by re-instituting the pro-life “Mexico City Policy”. (LifeSiteNews)

Thank you, God the Father, Son and the Holy Spirit.

Thank you for sending your mighty angels, led by the Archangel Michael, to help us.

And may the peace and joy and love of Jesus Christ our Lord be with you!

~Eowyn