Category Archives: Catholic Church

Vatican threatens to excommunicate priest for criticizing Pope Francis

About two weeks ago, I posted about Cardinal Gerhard Müller sounding the alarm that there is a “pervading sense of fear” in Pope Francis’ Curia — the administrative body of the Holy See in Vatican City, Rome. Müller had served five years as prefect of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith until this July, when Pope Francis decided not to renew his term for reasons Müller said had never been explained to him.

Müller wasn’t exaggerating or being a false alarmist. Nearly two years ago, I’d posted about the sorry situation of the Catholic Church under Pope Francis, wherein critics are censored and threatened with excommunication.

Pope Francis hides the Crucifix meeting Israeli rabbis

Alessandro Maria Minutella, 44, is a priest in Sicily nationally known for his open criticism of Pope Francis’ controversial Amoris Laetitia “apostalic exhortation” and what Minutella calls “the false Church of modernism”.

Because of his outspoken defense of the traditional Catholic faith, Minutella was officially removed from his parish and forbidden to celebrate Mass, administer the Sacraments, or preach. He was ordered to remain silent for nine months, which he obeyed, although he was attacked and vilified by the Italian media, especially by the satirical TV show, The Hyenas.

After observing silence for 9 months, Minutella was threatened by the Curia that he would receive a “double excommunication” (whatever that means) if he did not make two public acts of fidelity to Pope Francis on social networks. Never mind the fact that pedophile and openly homosexual priests are not excommunicated. (See Pope Francis’ Vatican: a cesspool of pedophiles and homosexuals“)

On November 9, 2017, sitting at a desk with a statue of St. Michael the Archangel, Alessandro Minutella recorded this video as his impassioned response, which was broadcast on Radio Domina Nostra.

Some excerpts of Minutella’s speech:

“Since when on last June 26, 2017, my bishop, Corrado Lorefice, removed me from my role as parish priest, with immediate execution, I didn’t even have the chance to say goodbye to my parishioners and substantially was suspended . . . even though they continue to say ‘This is not a suspension! This is not a suspension!,’ when in fact it substantially is.”

Note: Corrado Lorefice was appointed Archbishop of Palermo, Sicily, by Pope Francis in October 2015. In June 2017 Lorefice donated a chapel to serve as a synagogue for the Jewish community of Naples. He has written favorably about the neo-Marxist liberation theology.

Minutella continues:

“Last March, I was obliged to remain silent on all social networks . . . for having spoken the truth on the false church. I have known moral persecution and have been practically reduced to being an exile” — his priesthood “unjustly scorned” and his reputation “ruined” and “derided”.

Minutella vows that he will continue “to raise my voice in defense of the Catholic faith which today is being jeopardized like never before,” and decries Pope Francis’ so-called “Church of Mercy” that “runs to all the Italian ports to welcome the poor immigrants, but then brings to the guillotine those who don’t adhere to its single line of thought of dictatorial nature. These people are not afraid of me who can easily be eliminated — I have no bodyguards and no defense . . . . Holy mother Church has been occupied, because we are speaking of a true invasion,” which Minutella calls a “heretical deception . . . that reevaluates Martin Luther to the point of considering him a holy reformer”.

Note: Pope Francis had declared 2016 to be a “Holy Year of Mercy”.

On the demand that he must make a public fidelity to Pope Francis on social networks or be “doubly excommunicated,” Minutella explains that in the past, he had expressed his “respect” for the pope’s “intellect” and “will,” but he cannot declare a public fidelity to “the Roman pontiff” because to do so is to go against his soul as “no one is above the Gospel”.

Using apocalyptic language, Minutella all but calls Pope Francis the False Prophet of the end days. He calls on Catholics to “all stand up” in “resistance until the end” because the battle is not “between the progressives who are in government and the ones who are suspended and excommunicated for being faithful to the Magisterium. This is the battle between the woman dressed in the sun and the infernal dragon that has launched its most subtle attack on the Church.”

Full transcript (in English) of Minutella here.

See also:

~Eowyn

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High school students give homeless-friendless veteran a final farewell

Catholic Memorial High School (CMH) is a co-ed Catholic high school in Waukesha, Wisconsin. Established in 1949, CMH opened as a parochial school for St. Joseph’s parish, named for the 23 men of St. Joseph’s who died in World War II. Later, the dedication of the school was extended to include all graduates and former students of CMH who have died in service to their country. With 80 faculty and an enrollment in 2016-2017 of 660, Catholic Memorial is a college preparatory school and a participant in the International Baccalaureate Program.

The school’s motto is “Caritas in Omnibus”, Latin for “charity in all things”.

True to their school’s motto, when Catholic Memorial students learned that a homeless U.S. Army veteran, known only as John, had died on the streets with neither family nor friends, the students decided to give John a final send-off that he deserves.

Bill Shields reports for CBS Boston that on Nov. 15, 2017, John was buried with full military honors.

But before an Army hearse took his flag-covered casket away, there was a memorial Mass in Catholic Memorial’s chapel, presided by Rev. Chris Palladino, who volunteered his services and the eulogy.

After the memorial Mass, a contingent of Catholic Memorial High School seniors carried John’s flag-draped coffin to the waiting hearse, accompanied by the playing of taps.

CMH President Peter Folan explained:

“For us paying homage to a veteran, to bring him to our campus, to provide the burial rights he deserves, and to honor his legacy and to help our boys realize we have to stand with those who are marginalized.”

CMH senior class president Will Padden said:

“We have a lot of veterans in my own family so I know the sacrifice he made for the country and I know the service he committed in the years he committed to serving our country. John in this case needed a family and we were there to be John’s family.”

In life, John didn’t have any family. But in death he found a huge family at Catholic Memorial High.

~Eowyn

Cardinal Müller: ‘Pervading sense of fear’ in Pope Francis’ Curia

The Curia of the Roman Catholic Church is the administrative body of the Holy See in Vatican City, Rome, through which the pope conducts the business of the Church as a whole.

On Sept. 13, 2017, the premier English-language Vatican journalist Edward Pentin had a sit-down interview with Cardinal Gerhard Müller, who had served five years as prefect of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith until this July, when Pope Francis decided not to renew his term for reasons Müller said were never explained to him.

The Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith (CDF) is the oldest among the nine congregations of the Roman Curia. It was founded to defend the church from heresy; today, it is the body responsible for promulgating and defending Catholic doctrine. There are reports that since the 2013 election of Jorge Bergoglio to the papacy, the Congregation has been less stringent in taking action against dissident theologians.

Edward Pentin reports for the National Catholic Register, Sept. 28, 2017, that in the extensive interview, Cardinal Müller:

  • Criticizes what he describes as careerists and opportunists who he says are sowing discord in the Roman Curia and besmirched his name.
  • Discusses the dangers of the CDF being ignored, particularly in the drafting process of pontifical documents such as the Pope’s very controversial apostolic exhortation on the family, Amoris Laetitia (The Joy of Love), especially the highly disputed chapter 8 on allowing Holy Communion for remarried divorcees.
  • Asserts that a pervading sense of fear is preventing more people, particularly priests, seminarians and professors, from daring to openly criticize Francis’ pontificate.

Below are excerpts of what Cardinal Müller said:

(1) On close advisers to Pope Francis:

“I heard that the Pope is close to certain theologians, but they cannot claim to be authoritative interpreters of the Pope. If Archbishop Fernandez makes a declaration, for instance, that’s only private. It has no more weight than the statements of other bishops — and certainly for the whole Church, he has no magisterial authority — and so it holds no more authority for me than any other theological voice.”

(2) On being dismissed as prefect of the CDF:

[N]o explanation was offered to me. The Pope only saw me at a routine private audience, at the end of my term, to discuss the work of the congregation, and said, ‘That is all.’ All other explanations in the mass media are speculations. It is true that some time ago the Pope told me that some of his ‘friends’ had been saying that ‘Müller is an enemy of the Pope.’ I suppose these were anonymous accusations, and the anonymity of the accusers suggests that they were not prepared to have their arguments exposed to the light of honest and open discussion. The use of such underhanded tactics is always detrimental to the life of the Church and to the functioning of the Curia . . . . For the good of the Curia and the Church, there should be open dialogue. I must refute any calumnies that have originated in certain parts of the press, or from certain ultramontanist circles and Vaticanisti, and this anonymous group of false ‘friends’ around the Holy Father who have questioned my loyalty. All my life as a priest, theologian and bishop, I’ve worked for the Kingdom of God and his Holy Church. And to present me as an enemy of the Successor of St. Peter is completely crazy and unjust . . . . The biggest danger to the Pope these days are these opportunists, careerists and false friends who are concerned not for the good of the Church, but for their own financial interests and self-advancement . . . . But I firmly maintain my fidelity to Pope Francis, to whom I devoted myself as a loyal cooperator.”

(3) On Great Fear in the Curia:

“Careerists and opportunists should not be promoted, and other people who are competent collaborators not excluded without any reason or expelled from the Curia. It’s not good. I heard it from some houses here, that people working in the Curia are living in great fear: If they say one small or harmless critical word, some spies will pass the comments directly to the Holy Father, and the falsely accused people don’t have any chance to defend themselves. These people, who are speaking bad words and lies against other persons, are disturbing and disrupting the good faith, the good name of others whom they are calling their brothers.

The Gospel and the words of Jesus are very strong against those who denounce their brothers and who are creating this bad atmosphere of suspicion. I’ve heard that nobody speaks; everyone is a little afraid because they can be snitched on. It’s not the behavior of adult people, but that of a boarding school.

It’s the same in some theological faculties — if anybody has any remarks or questions about Amoris Laetitia, they will be expelled, and so on. That is not maturity. A certain interpretation of the document’s Footnote 351 cannot be criteria for becoming a bishop. A future bishop must be a witness to the Gospel, a successor of the apostles, and not only someone who repeats some words of a single pastoral document of the Pope without a mature theological understanding.”

“It is a very big danger for the Church that some ideological groups present themselves as the exclusive guardians of the only true interpretation of Amoris Laetitia. They feel they have the right to condemn all people of another standpoint as stupid, rigid, old-fashioned, medieval, etc.”

(4) On “Progressive” Catholics:

“All my life, after the Second Vatican Council, I’ve noticed that those who support so-called progressivism never have theological arguments. The only method they have is to discredit other persons, calling them ‘conservative’” — and this changes the real point, which is the reality of the faith, and not in your personal subjective, psychological disposition. By ‘conservative,’ what do they mean? Someone loves the ways of the 1950s, or old Hollywood films of the 1930s? Was the bloody persecution of Catholics during the French Revolution by the Jacobins progressive or conservative? Or is the denial of the divinity of Christ by the Arians of the fourth century liberal or traditional? Theologically it’s not possible to be conservative or progressive. These are absurd categories: Neither conservatism nor progressivism is anything to do with the Catholic faith. They’re political, polemical, rhetorical forms. The only sense of these categories is discrediting other persons.

We have Holy Scripture, we have eschatological revelation in Jesus Christ, the irreversibility of Jesus Christ, the Incarnation, the salvation of the cross, the Resurrection, the Second Coming of Jesus Christ for the end of the world. … The responsibility of the Pope and the bishops is to overcome the polarization. Therefore, it’s very dangerous for the Church to divide bishops into friends and enemies of the Pope regarding a footnote in an apostolic exhortation. I am sure that anybody will denounce me also for this interview, but I hope that the Holy Father will read my complete interview here and not only some headlines, which cannot give a complete impression of what I said.”

(5) On Limits to the Pope’s Authority:

“We must distinguish between what is official doctrine of the Church, the role of the Pope, and what he is saying in private conversations. Those private opinions of the Pope need to be respected because they are opinions and words of the Holy Father, but nobody is obliged to accept uncritically everything that he’s saying, for example, about political or scientific questions. That’s his personal opinion, but nothing to do with our Catholic faith, by which we are justified in the grace of God.”

“The Successor of St. Peter deserves full respect for his person and divine mandate, and, on the other hand, his honest critics deserve a convincing answer . . . [concerning] controversial interpretation of some statements in Chapter 8 of Amoris Laetitia.

The Pope is only assisted by the Holy Spirit for the authentic interpretation of the revelation of God in Christ. He and the bishops are human cooperators in transmitting Revelation, which is completely given in Jesus Christ, the incarnate Word of God, but they don’t get any other revelation.

“In the Incarnate Word of God, in the Son of God, Jesus Christ, to us is given all the grace and truth. The Holy Spirit actualizes the full revelation in the doctrine, the sacraments of the Church. The Holy Father plays here a very important role in the apostolic Tradition, but not the only one. His teaching is regulated by the word of God in the Bible and the dogmatic Tradition of the Church. The magisterium and all the believers are supported by the Holy Spirit in the actualization of the full and complete revelation, but they do not receive any new public revelation . . . .

Nobody can demand of a Catholic to believe a doctrine which is in an obvious contradiction to the Holy Scripture, apostolic Tradition and the dogmatic definitions of the Popes and ecumenical councils in the matter of faith and morals. What is needed is a religious obedience, but not a blind faith, to the Pope and the bishops, and nothing at all to private friends and advisers . . . . We do not just believe things because a Pope teaches them, but because these truths are included in Revelation.”

Below is a video of Edward Pentin’s speech at the recently concluded Catholic Identity Conference 2017 on a climate of fear in Rome and the crisis in the Catholic Church during the reign of Pope Francis.

The Catholic Identity Conference 2017 was an extraordinary weekend conference, October 27-29 in Weirton, WV, of serious Catholics, including bishops, priests and journalists, to defend the Catholic Church suffering her worst assault in history.

See also:

~Eowyn

Sunday Devotional: Whoever exalts himself will be humbled

Matthew 23:1-12

Jesus spoke to the crowds and to his disciples, saying,
“The scribes and the Pharisees
have taken their seat on the chair of Moses.
Therefore, do and observe all things whatsoever they tell you,
but do not follow their example.
For they preach but they do not practice.
They tie up heavy burdens hard to carry
and lay them on people’s shoulders,
but they will not lift a finger to move them.
All their works are performed to be seen.
They widen their phylacteries* and lengthen their tassels.
They love places of honor at banquets, seats of honor in synagogues,
greetings in marketplaces, and the salutation ‘Rabbi.’
As for you, do not be called ‘Rabbi.’
You have but one teacher, and you are all brothers.
Call no one on earth your father;
you have but one Father in heaven.
Do not be called ‘Master’;
you have but one master, the Christ.
The greatest among you must be your servant.
Whoever exalts himself will be humbled;
but whoever humbles himself will be exalted.”

*Phylactery (definition): A small leather box containing Hebrew texts on vellum, worn by Jewish men at morning prayer as a reminder to keep the law.

What a stunning rebuke this passage from Matthew 23 is!

Try this:

In the place of “scribes”, “Pharisees”, “synagogues” and “Rabbi”, insert the words “priests”, “ministers”, “churches” and “pastor/bishop/archbishop/cardinal/pope” — and Matthew 23 is as timely today as then, as a rebuke of hypocritical, uncaring and pretentious church clergy, with their pomp and ceremony and bureaucratic titles.

Matthew 23 is also a rebuke to us, when we exalt ourselves by pretending to possess knowledge of God over others. For we are all the same — brothers and sisters in Christ, who have but “one Father in heaven” and “one master, the Christ.”

May the love and peace of our Lord Jesus Christ be with you,

~Eowyn

U.S. bishops oppose federal enforcement of immigration laws

Matthew 22:15-21

The Pharisees went off
and plotted how they might entrap Jesus in speech.
They sent their disciples to him, with the Herodians, saying,
“…Is it lawful to pay the census tax to Caesar or not?”
Knowing their malice, Jesus said,
“Why are you testing me, you hypocrites?
Show me the coin that pays the census tax.”
Then they handed him the Roman coin.
He said to them, “Whose image is this and whose inscription?”
They replied, “Caesar’s.”
At that he said to them,
“Then give to Caesar what belongs to Caesar
and to God what belongs to God.”

“Sanctuary” is a name given to a city, county, or state that shelters illegal immigrants in violation and defiance of federal immigration laws.

While there is no universal legal definition of a sanctuary jurisdiction, those that describe themselves as sanctuary have some public policies of leniency regarding enforcement of federal immigration laws. Typically, a sanctuary city/county/state forbids its police or other government employees (such as schools and community health care centers) to inquire about an individual’s immigration status.

On January 25, 2017, five days after his inauguration, President Trump signed an executive order vowing to strip some federal funds from sanctuary jurisdictions that “willfully violate federal law in an attempt to shield aliens from removal from the United States,” because sanctuary cities “have caused immeasurable harm to the American people and to the very fabric of our republic.” (Source: whitehouse.gov)

The Trump administration and opponents of illegal immigration say that sanctuary cities make it easy for violent individuals and gang members, who are not supposed to be in the country to begin with, to evade detection by federal immigration authorities. The critics point to several highly publicized incidents where illegal aliens have committed horrific crimes of murder, rape, shootings, armed robberies and assaults, including the murder of Kate Steinle by illegal alien Jose Zarate in San Francisco, a sanctuary city since 2008.

Kate Steinle: Killed by an illegal alien.

President Trump followed his executive order with a Feb. 16 news conference in which he:

  • Vowed to launch a “crackdown on sanctuary cities,” announcing that a “nationwide effort to remove criminal aliens” had begun.
  • Ordered an end to the “catch-and-release policy” that allows apprehended illegal aliens to go free while awaiting a court hearing;
  • Announced the creation of “a new office in Homeland Security dedicated to the forgotten American victims of illegal immigrant violence, of which there are many.”

According to the Center for Immigration Studies, there are 4 sanctuary states (California, Colorado, Connecticut, New Mexico) and 165 sanctuary cities and counties across America, mainly clustered in the Northeast, the Midwest and the West Coast.

A considerable part of the sanctuary movement is occurring in California, which became a sanctuary state on October 5, 2017, despite being warned by the Trump Department of Justice that it could lose more than $18 million in federal funding. A snapshot of the scope of the California situation was provided in a brief released in late April by the Education Trust-West advocacy group:

  • 1 in 13 California residents is an illegal alien, comprising 20% of all undocumented persons in the U.S.
  • About 12% (or 750,000 students) of all students in California’s K-12 schools have an undocumented parent.

Brian Faga reports for National Catholic Register, May 11, 2017, that U.S. bishops have spoken out against President Trump’s plan to reduce sanctuary cities/states’ federal funding.

Even before President Trump’s executive order, the Catholic Church in the United States, as represented by the U. S. Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB), already had made clear their refusal to support the federal government’s enforcement of immigration laws. As an August 2013 document posted on the USCCB’s website puts it, “The United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB) opposes ‘enforcement only’ immigration policies and supports comprehensive immigration reform.”

President Trump’s executive order drew sharp rebukes from Church leaders, including:

  • Bishop Joe Vásquez of Austin, Texas, the chairman of the USCCB’s Committee on Migration, released a Jan. 26 statement where he said the President’s executive order risked injuring local relationships between migrant communities and law enforcement and would force local jurisdictions to accept a “one-size-fits-all” approach to immigration policy. “I have enormous respect for and value our federal law enforcement agents who risk their lives every day to enforce our immigration laws. I also recognize that there may well be situations where local governments feel they need to foster a relationship with their communities by working with the victims of or witnesses to crime without instilling a fear that, by coming forward, they or their family members will be handed over to immigration authorities.”
  • Bishop Joseph Kopacz of Jackson, Mississippi, issued a statement on Feb. 15 opposing a bill that would prohibit cities and universities from declaring themselves as sanctuaries for immigrants without legal documents. Kopacz calls the bill “flawed and not needed.”
  • The Texas Conference of Catholic Bishops condemned a new Texas law passed in late April that punishes local police officers if they do not cooperate with detainer requests issued by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), as well as enables local police to inquire into the legal status of anyone arrested or detained.
  • Cardinal Daniel DiNardo of Galveston-Houston, who is also President of the USCCB, called the Texas law inhumane: “Immigration law should be enforced in a way that is targeted, proportional and humane. This bill does not meet the standard.”
  • Ned Dolejsi, executive director of the California Catholic Conference, said California bishops support S.B. 54, a state bill that would prohibit local and state law enforcement agencies from using their resources to help federal immigration enforcement. Dolejsi said, “From the Catholic Conference’s standpoint, we want the undocumented people [i.e, criminals] protected. We don’t want mass deportations to occur here. We’re trying to accompany people and provide legal services, support and encouragement to folks. At the same time, we recognize that it’s important to remove serious violent felons and the need for some type of relationship between local law enforcement and ICE. How we get there is going to be an interesting struggle.”
  • Lorena Melgarejo, an immigration advocate for the Archdiocese of San Francisco, said that “undocumented immigrants” are feeling more anxious than ever that they or their loved ones will soon be rounded up and deported, although she admitted to not having seen any actual signs of stepped-up immigration enforcement by the federal government. “The only thing we can do from a pastoral standpoint is to walk with people in this moment, provide information, connect them to resources and take that as an opportunity to engage and encounter people in dialogue, not just with immigrants, but also with other Catholics who are asking themselves: What is their role in a moment when our communities feel targeted?”
  • Christy Williams, an advocacy attorney with Catholic Legal Immigration Network Inc., said, “If [illegal] immigrants know there is a standing policy that local leaders have taken time to implement, a policy to respect their civil rights, to promote practices that treat them in a humane manner and with dignity, I think they tend to feel welcome, and I think that’s the most important thing.

Marguerite Telford, a Catholic and a spokeswoman for the Center for Immigration Studies, a Washington, D.C.-based think tank that supports a stricter national immigration policy, told the National Catholic Register she does not agree with the approach of bishops and other Church officials who emphasize assisting illegals over border security, national sovereignty and public-safety concerns. She said:

“I care about the victims [of illegal alien criminals], and I’ve met a lot of the victims of these crimes, and I almost never hear my church talk about the victims of criminal aliens — almost never. I don’t understand why the bishops don’t have a heart for those impacted by the United States having open borders, with no vetting, and allowing people to be in this country whom we know nothing about.”

This is the US Conference of Catholic Bishops’ explanation of Matthew 22:21:

“Repay to Caesar what belongs to Caesar: those who willingly use the coin that is Caesar’s should repay him in kind.”

St. Thomas Aquinas, a Doctor of the Church considered by the Catholic Church to be the greatest theologian and philosopher, respected a country’s laws governing immigration and would gravely disapprove of illegal “immigrants”, much less their brazen demands for special treatment in the U.S. today. So prudent and concerned was he for the well being of the host country that St. Thomas recommended that even legal immigrants be granted citizenship only after 2 or 3 generations. (See “St. Thomas Aquinas disapproved of illegal immigration and expected all immigrants to assimilate“)

In their opposition to the U.S. government’s enforcement of immigration laws approved by Congress, U.S. bishops precisely go against not only what St. Thomas had recommended, but also what Jesus Himself had instructed — that we who “willingly use the coin” that is the federal government’s should “repay in kind” by observing the government’s laws.

And since the bishops are picking and choosing which federal government law to oppose and ignore, does that mean we get to pick and choose which of God’s commandments or church law/doctrine to ignore as well?

See also:

~Eowyn

‘Deliver Us’ documentary on Italian exorcists

Premiering on October 26 in the UK and Europe, Deliver Us is a documentary  on exorcists in Italy trying to keep up with an increasing global demand for church-sanctioned exorcism.

The Telegraph‘s movie reviewer Rachel Ray gave Deliver Us 4 out of 5 stars. She writes:

While the Catholic Church keeps no central database for the number of people asking for exorcism or the number of times it is performed, Italians are reported to seek the Rite on a more regular basis than dental appointments….

In Rome and Milan, the number of church appointed priest-exorcists has grown from six to 12, and the Church has set up an emergency call centre. In the US, over the past decade, the number of priest-exorcists has more than quadrupled from 12 to 50. As noted American exorcist, Father Vincent Lampert of the Archdiocese of Indianapolis points out, it is not the Church that is increasing the demand for exorcists, it is people.

Father Lampert would be supported in that opinion by this film, which shows people travelling from across Sicily to [80-year-old Franciscan] Father Cataldo [Migliazzo]’s mass of liberation in Palermo every Tuesday, and for private sessions with the exorcist.  But Father Cataldo will only admit so many people into the church on a given day and many are turned away.

During the service, people scream, moan, and cry. A young man writhes on the floor spitting. An elderly woman who is led out of the church seems to be speaking in tongues. Another woman screams: “I’ll take her to Hell!”

The dilemma that any exorcist faces is deciding whether a person’s condition is the result of psychological problems or demonic activity. This is discernment, the first step in the Rite of Exorcism and in the US at least might involve examination reports from a team of psychologists or psychiatrists. This grey area of mental versus spiritual is clearly what interests the film’s director, Federica Di Giacomo. She observes: “My first aim was to find stories for a film about obsessions, a sort of a journey through mental addictions.”  Perhaps unbeknown to Miss Di Giacomo when she began the project was that obsession can be a form of demonic affliction.

The demonic-weary Father Cataldo conducts discernment in his own way. To the parents of a boy who spits at his teachers and makes fun of his father, the priest says he’s a good boy, calm, take him back to the psychologist. But for a woman who becomes increasingly agitated by the recitation of prayer, Father Cataldo tries to deliver her from Satan as she is held to the floor growling and screaming.

Another woman seems to be suffering from depression. And the priest listens patiently to a young man who believes his life-threatening bike accident may have been the result of his lapsed spiritual state. Regardless of what the exorcist thinks though, all of these sufferers seem to believe that church intervention can cure what ails them.

So many people want Father Cataldo’s services that he even conducts deliverance via mobile phone. But the documentary is not shallow.  Miss Di Giacomo gives us a more in-depth look into cases that may be possession, attachment, vexation, or oppression – all varying degrees of demonic influence. A number of the film’s subjects have been having exorcisms on a routine basis over a period of years for their conditions.

A young woman, Giulia, dabbles in the occult and consults mediums. She has great difficulty being in a church without screaming and acting out. As Father Cataldo prays with her, her eyes roll back, exposing the whites. She writhes on the church floor and screams at the priest “you’ll burn in hell with me”. But even after the exorcism seems to change her looks and demeanor, by the end of the film she still cannot give up the mediums and resists returning for more sessions in the church where she is visibly uncomfortable.

Two sisters relate a history of molestation and abuse from their mother’s boyfriend. Now, in middle age, one of the sisters cannot function normally and her marriage is failing. She growls and crawls under tables in the church as the exorcism proceeds. Like Giulia, her case is unresolved. An attractive middle-aged woman loses control of her limbs, falling down, when she enters a church. She can find no psychological or physical explanation from physicians after years of trying. And countless MRIs and other tests.

And perhaps one of the saddest cases is a young man in Palermo, addicted to cocaine, who is shunned by his family, and fears he will be committed to an institution without Father Cataldo’s help. Filmed in the nightspots of Palermo, he laments: “Society doesn’t let you get better or run away from certain things.”

One cannot help but be in sturdy, hard-working Father Cataldo’s corner in this spiritual fight. “Being an exorcist is an exhausting job,” he notes with resignation. Exorcist-priests are appointed by their Bishops often with little choice in whether to take on the job. And for viewers who have no spiritual beliefs, the question might be asked why these sufferers, in increasing numbers, are seeking relief from the Church.

Here’s a clip from the documentary. Pay special attention at the 0:42 mark.

See also:

~Eowyn

Evidence that immigration depresses wages: U.S. & UK

There is a strong correlation between immigration—particularly illegal immigration—and wages.

The reason is simple — the economic principle of supply and demand. In the case of immigration, that means the more supply of workers, the lower the wages.

But liberal economists and proponents of mass immigration see immigration as an absolute economic good, insisting that immigration is necessary for the economy to grow. (Click here for the three reasons why liberals are wrong.)

The empirical evidence does not support the liberal position.

UK:

The Telegraph reports, Sept. 6, 2017, that during an appearance at Prime Minister’s Questions (PMQs) at the UK Parliament, Prime Minister Theresa May said:

“We continue to believe as a government that it’s important to have net migration at sustainable levels, we believe that to be in the tens of thousands, because of the impact, particularly it has, on people at the lower end of the income scale in depressing their wages.”

USA:

National Economics Editorial reports, August 6, 2017:

According to the National Association of Home Builders, more than 56% of America’s developers are reporting labor shortages, which is forcing them to increase wages and improve working conditions to attract new talent.

In fact, according to Ted Wilson of Residential Strategies Inc. construction costs have risen by 30% this year—the majority of which is due to higher wages and increased overtime pay. That is, companies are being forced to hire American workers, and pay wages at fair market value.

The reason, of course, is President Trump’s crackdown on illegal immigration, resulting in fewer “undocumented” workers in the construction and other industries. See:

According to Stan Market, CEO of Texas’ Marek, as many as “half of the workers in construction in Texas are undocumented.” Many of them are leaving Texas, either to Mexico or to foolish and illegal U.S. sanctuary cities and states. See:

And it’s not just the construction industry. In Maine, the mere restriction of temporary work visas earlier this year led to higher wages, better working conditions, and lower unemployment.

All this is good news for American workers, whose real wages (not nominal wages) have not risen since 1973, in part because of the deflationary effects of illegal immigration.

So we should ask why America’s religious leaders officials are so adamant on promoting and protecting illegal immigrants and “refugees”:

~Eowyn