Category Archives: Christians/Christianity

Sunday Devotional: The children of God will rise from the dead

Luke 20:27, 34-38

Some Sadducees, those who deny that there is a resurrection,
came forward.

Jesus said to them,
“The children of this age marry and remarry;
but those who are deemed worthy to attain to the coming age
and to the resurrection of the dead
neither marry nor are given in marriage.
They can no longer die,
for they are like angels;
and they are the children of God
because they are the ones who will rise.
That the dead will rise
even Moses made known in the passage about the bush,
when he called out ‘Lord, ‘
the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob;
and he is not God of the dead, but of the living,
for to him all are alive.”

The Empty Tomb

Two months ten days ago I lost my husband, whom I have loved since I was 22.

Several years ago, I was told by my guardian angel: “You will miss him when he’s gone.”

I miss him, sorely.

He was my intellectual mentor and my best friend, with whom I shared important beliefs and values — the Christian worldview and morality, and the conservative political ideology.

My loss would be unbearable if I did not believe that though his body is gone, his immortal soul lives and is with God, having received the holy sacrament of the Last Rites before he breathed his last. 

I am familiar with old people, whom I regularly saw, conversed with, and befriended in the assisted living facility where my husband spent his last three years. Most of the elderly in the facility are not Christians. I often wonder how they cope with old age and their impending death without the Christian beliefs that we have souls, which are immortal; that Jesus Christ resurrected from the dead; and that we are promised that as His children, we too will rise from the dead.

How utterly unbearable old age and dying must be for the unbeliever . . . .

Wisdom 2:23-24, 3:1,9

God formed man to be imperishable;
the image of his own nature he made them.
But by the envy of the Devil, death entered the world,
and they who are in his possession experience it.

But the souls of the just are in the hand of God,
and no torment shall touch them….
Those who trust in him shall understand truth,
and the faithful shall abide with him in love:
Because grace and mercy are with his holy ones,
and his care is with his elect.

See also:

May the peace and love of Jesus Christ our Lord be with you,

~Eowyn

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Pope Francis calls Jesus’ sacrifice on the cross a ‘failure’

Jorge Bergoglio, the creature in the Vatican pretending to be Pope, joked about Jesus Christ’s crucifixion, is ashamed of the crucifix and conceals it so as not to offend Jews, and refuses to genuflect at the consecration of bread and wine into His Body and Blood.

Most recently, according to Italian journalist Eugenio Scalfari on October 8, 2019, Pope Francis said that once Jesus Christ became incarnate, he was a “man of exceptional virtues” but “not at all a God.”

Although this happened four years ago, I’ve only just be made aware of this:

On September 24, 2015, Pope Francis was in New York City, where he delivered a homily at evening prayer at St. Patrick’s Cathedral in Manhattan.

Beginning at the 0:34 mark, Pope Francis said, to thunderous and sustained applause:

“we need to remember that we are followers of Jesus Christ and his life, humanly speaking, ended in failure, the failure of the cross.”

Whoa!

The Pope called Jesus’ sacrifice on the cross a “failure”?

Is the “failure of the cross” quote taken out of context?

Here’s the full English-translation transcript of his homily (sources: Washington Post; ABC News). I’ve emboldened and colored red the pertinent paragraph containing the “failure of the cross” quote:

I would like to express two sentiments for my Muslim brothers and sisters: Firstly, my greetings as they celebrate the feast of sacrifice. I would have wished my greeting to be warmer. My sentiments of closeness, my sentiments of closeness in the face of tragedy. The tragedy that they suffered in Mecca.

In this moment, I give assurances of my prayers. I unite myself with you all. A prayer to almighty god, all merciful.

This beautiful cathedral of St. Patrick’s, built over many years through the sacrifices of many men and women is a symbol of the work of generations of American priests and religious and faithful who helped build up the church in the United States.

Many priests and religious in this country that have not only in education but in other areas have had a central role assisting parents in handing down to their children the food that nourishes them for life. Many did so at the cost of extraordinary sacrifice and with heroic charity.

I think, for example, of saint Elizabeth Ann Seton, who founded the first free catholic school for girls in the United States or in saint John Neumann, the founder of the first system of catholic education in this country.

This evening, my brothers and sisters, I have come to join you in prayer that our vocations as priests will continue to build up the great edifice of God’s kingdom in this country.

I know that, as a the presbyterate in the midst of god’s people, you recently have suffered greatly in the not distant past by having to bear the shame of some of your brothers, brothers who have harmed and scandalized the church in the most vulnerable of her members.

In the words of the book of revelation, I know well that you have come forth from the great tribulation and I accompany you at this time of pain and difficulty. And I thank god for your faithful service onto his people, doing so in helping you to preserve on the path of fidelity to Jesus Christ.

And I would like to offer two brief reflections. The first concern is of the spirit of gratitude. The joy of men and women who love god attracts others to him. Priests and religious are called to find and radiate lasting satisfaction in their vocation. Joy springs from a grateful heart.

Truly, we have received much, so many graces, so many blessings. And in this, we rejoice. It will do us good to think back on our lives with the grace of remembrance.

Remembrance of when we were first called, remembrance of the road traveled, remembrance of graces received. And, above all, remembrance of our encounter with Jesus Christ so often along the way.

Remembrance of the amazement which our encounter with Jesus Christ has awakened in our hearts.

Sisters, brothers, priests and religious to seek the grace of remembrance so as to grow in the spirit of gratitude. Perhaps we need to ask ourselves: are we capable of counting our blessings? Or have I forgotten them?

A second area is the spirit of hard work. The grateful heart is spontaneously impelled to serve the lord and to find expression in a life of commitment to our work. Once we realize how much god has given us, we learn that a life of sacrifice, of working for him and for others, becomes a privileged way, a privileged way of responding to his great love.

Yet, if we are honest, we must recognize how easily this spirit of generous self-sacrifice can be dampened. There are a couple of ways that this can happen. And both are examples of the spiritual worldliness which weakens our commitment to serve as dedicated men and women.

And it diminishes the wonder of our first encounter with Christ. We can get caught up in measuring the value of our apostolic works by the standards of efficiency, good management and outward success, which govern the business world.

Not that these things are unimportant, of course. But we have been entrusted with a great responsibility, and this is why god’s people rightly expect accountability from us but the true worth of our apostolate is measured by the value it has in god’s eyes, to see and evaluate things from god’s perspective, calls for constant conversion in the first days and years of our vocation and, need I say, it demands great humility.

The cross shows us a different way of measuring success. Ours is to plant the seeds. God sees to the fruits of our labors. And if at times our efforts and works seem to fail and not produce fruit, we need to remember that we are followers of Jesus Christ and his life, humanly speaking, ended in failure, the failure of the cross.

Another danger — another danger emerges when we become jealous of our free time, when we think that surrounding ourselves with worldly comforts help us to serve better. The problem with this way of reasoning is that it can blunt the power of god’s daily call to conversion, to encounter with him.

Slowly but surely, it diminishes our spirit of sacrifice, our spirit of renunciation and our spirit of hard work. It also alienates people who suffer material poverty and who are forced to make greater sacrifices than those that we make ourselves.

Rest is needed, as are moments of leisure and self-enrichment, but we need to learn to rest in a way that deepens our desire to serve with generosity. Closeness to the poor, the refugee, the immigrant, the sick, the exploited, the elderly living alone, prisoners and all god’s other poor, will teach us a different way of resting, one which is more Christian and generous.

Gratitude and hard work, these are two pillars of the spiritual life which I have wanted to share with you this evening. With you, the priest and religious men and women this afternoon.

I thank you for your prayers and your work and for the daily sacrifices that you make in the various areas of your apostolate. Many of these are known only to god, but they bear rich fruit for the life of the church.

I would especially like to thank and express my esteem and gratitude to the religious women of the United States.

What indeed — what would the church be without you? Women’s strength, fighters, with that spirit of courage which puts you on the front lines in the proclamation of the gospel. To you, religious women, sisters and mothers of this people, I wish to say thank you.

A big thank you and to tell you that I love you very much. I know that many of you are on the front lines in meeting the challenges of adapting to an evolving pastoral landscape, like Saint Peter, I ask you, that regardless of the difficulties and trials that you face, be at peace and respond to them as Christ did. He gave thanks to the father, took up his cross and looked forward.

Dear brothers and sisters, in a few moments, we will sing the Magnificat. Let us commend to our lady the work we have been entrusted to do. Let us join her in thanking god for the great things he has done. And for the great things he will continue to do in us and in those whom we have the privilege to serve.

So are the words “failure of the cross” taken out of context?

No matter the protestations of those who try to defend this pretender to the seat of St. Peter (see the ABC News readers’ comments), note that Pope Francis did not follow the words “failure of the cross” with any explanation or elaboration of what he meant:

  • Pope Francis did not say that Jesus’ death on the cross was salvific — a spiritual victory over sin and evil. By His sacrificial crucifixion, the Second Person of the Triune Godhead freed humanity from the wages of our first parents’ terrible sin, making possible the salvation of our eternal souls.
  • Nor did Pope Francis say that the “human” Jesus triumphed over death with His resurrection, which gives to those who follow Him the promise of eternal life.

This pretender to the seat of St. Peter is an abomination.

So are the Catholic Church’s hierarchy of cardinals, archbishops, bishops and priests who continue to recognize Jorge Bergoglio as their Pope.

H/t Maziel

See also:

~Eowyn

Better than Drudge Report. Check out Whatfinger News, the Internet’s conservative frontpage founded by ex-military!

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Sunday Devotional: ‘Before the Lord the whole universe is as a grain’

Wisdom 11:22-12:2

Before the LORD the whole universe is as a grain from a balance
or a drop of morning dew come down upon the earth.
But you have mercy on all, because you can do all things;
and you overlook people’s sins that they may repent.
For you love all things that are
and loathe nothing that you have made;
for what you hated, you would not have fashioned.
And how could a thing remain, unless you willed it;
or be preserved, had it not been called forth by you?
But you spare all things, because they are yours,
O LORD and lover of souls,
for your imperishable spirit is in all things!
Therefore you rebuke offenders little by little,
warn them and remind them of the sins they are committing,
that they may abandon their wickedness and believe in you, O LORD!

“Before the Lord the whole universe is as a grain….”

Do you want to see how our Earth, that tiny blue marble in our solar system, compares to other bodies in the Universe?

Here are some visual aids (source: BabaMail):

Psalm 19:1

The heavens declare the glory of God;
and the firmament showeth His handiwork.

Try to imagine the truly awesome, mind-boggling Being who created all this — this unimaginably vast Universe that our puny human pea-brain can’t even begin to grasp or comprehend.

And yet atheists declare there is no God and that this Universe happened willy nilly, just by accident. “There is no God” is a categorical universal negative, like the assertion “There is no unicorn,” the truth of which is dependent on the atheist having examined every place, every nook, every cranny in the unimaginably vast Universe to definitively preclude the existence of God. That, of course, is an impossibility, which just goes to show how grandiose, illogical and stupid atheists are.

It is said that when St. Thomas Aquinas (1225-1274), the towering intellect and theologian, was near death, he was given a glimpse of the Godhead. Humbled and awed, he whispered, referring to all of the many and brilliant works he had written in his lifetime: “All is straw.”

No wonder our Lord Jesus the Christ, the Second Person of the Triune Godhead who humbled Himself by incarnating as a flesh-and-blood man, instructed us that:

“I am the way and the truth and the life. No one comes to the Father except through me.” (John 14:16)

And we are alive this morning in this glorious Universe!

May the peace and love of Jesus Christ our Lord be with you,

~Eowyn

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We are all called to be saints!

Revelation 7:9-14

After this I had a vision of a great multitude,
which no one could count,
from every nation, race, people, and tongue.
They stood before the throne and before the Lamb,
wearing white robes and holding palm branches in their hands.
They cried out in a loud voice:

“Salvation comes from our God, who is seated on the throne,
and from the Lamb.”

All the angels stood around the throne
and around the elders and the four living creatures.
They prostrated themselves before the throne,
worshiped God, and exclaimed:

“Amen. Blessing and glory, wisdom and thanksgiving,
honor, power, and might
be to our God forever and ever. Amen.”

Then one of the elders spoke up and said to me,
“Who are these wearing white robes, and where did they come from?”
I said to him, “My lord, you are the one who knows.”
He said to me,
“These are the ones who have survived the time of great distress;
they have washed their robes
and made them white in the Blood of the Lamb.”

Today is All Saints’ Day — the day when we remember and honor the saints.

Do not be intimidated by the word “saint” — it simply means “holy”.

The Oxford Dictionary defines “holy” as a person who is dedicated to God, who is morally and spiritually excellent.

Today is the feast day of all holy persons, among whose ranks may be your family and friends who have passed away, whose numbers are far greater than those formally declared as saints by the Catholic Church.

Among the many things that distress me about the Church today is how rarely, if ever, priests make mention of the saints in their homilies. That puzzles me because the saints are our role models. They were, like us, wholly imperfect human beings. As an example, St. Jerome (331-420) is described as “By nature an irascible man with a sharp tongue” who “made enemies as well as friends” — which goes to show that one doesn’t have to be perfect to be a saint!

1 John 3:1-3

Beloved:
See what love the Father has bestowed on us
that we may be called the children of God.
Yet so we are.
The reason the world does not know us
is that it did not know him.
Beloved, we are God’s children now;
what we shall be has not yet been revealed.
We do know that when it is revealed we shall be like him,
for we shall see him as he is.
Everyone who has this hope based on him makes himself pure,
as he is pure.


God created us so that we eventually will join Him in Heaven for all eternity.

Since saints are holy, and only holy people will see God face to face, that means we are all called to be saints.

This morning, on All Saints’ Day, I’ll say it outright:

I want to be a saint!
And I want all of you to be saints!

Please join me in making the same affirmation. And let us help each other to become saints.

For the lives of some saints, please go to our “Angels & Saints” page.

The Greatest Commandment is to love God with our whole hearts, our whole souls, our whole minds, and with all our strength.

May the peace and joy and love of our Lord Jesus Christ be with you,

~Éowyn

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Inspiring words to begin your day

Romans 8:31, 34-35, 38-39

Brothers and sisters:
If God is for us, who can be against us?…
It is Christ Jesus who died, rather, was raised,
who also is at the right hand of God,
who indeed intercedes for us.
What will separate us from the love of Christ?….
For I am convinced that neither death, nor life,
nor angels, nor principalities,
nor present things, nor future things,
nor powers, nor height, nor depth,
nor any other creature will be able to separate us
from the love of God in Christ Jesus our Lord.

May the Light of the Christ shield and protect you from the evil ones,

~Eowyn

See “19 reasons not to do Halloween, a Satanic ‘holy’ day

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Demonrat Impeachment Vote Scheduled For Halloween!

Witches Unite to Cast ‘Binding Spell’ on Trump and Followers

Spiritual Warfare Allert

BREITBART:
House Democrats to Vote on Impeachment Procedures Thursday

House Democrats will vote on Thursday to establish the procedures for their ongoing impeachment investigation against President Donald Trump, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) announced Monday afternoon…

Read whole article


Are we afraid of them? No.

Is it mere coincidence that the plainly demonic DNC would choose the night of maximum demonic activity to attempt to remove Donald Trump? Trump is the greatest champion of the Church of any president in my lifetime. He is fighting for the cause of the Gospel at every point of conflict.

And again, are we afraid of witches’ spells? No.


Ephesians 6:10-18 New International Version (NIV)

The Armor of God
“Finally, be strong in the Lord and in his mighty power. Put on the full armor of God, so that you can take your stand against the devil’s schemes. For our struggle is not against flesh and blood, but against the rulers, against the authorities, against the powers of this dark world and against the spiritual forces of evil in the heavenly realms. Therefore put on the full armor of God, so that when the day of evil comes, you may be able to stand your ground, and after you have done everything, to stand. Stand firm then, with the belt of truth buckled around your waist, with the breastplate of righteousness in place, 15 and with your feet fitted with the readiness that comes from the gospel of peace. In addition to all this, take up the shield of faith, with which you can extinguish all the flaming arrows of the evil one. Take the helmet of salvation and the sword of the Spirit, which is the word of God.

And pray in the Spirit on all occasions with all kinds of prayers and requests. With this in mind, be alert and always keep on praying for all the Lord’s people.”


Proverbs 21:12 New International Version (NIV)

About Spell Casters
“The Righteous One takes note of
the house of the wicked
and brings the wicked to ruin.”

~ TD

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Sunday Devotional: Be persistent in proclaiming the truth

2 Timothy 4:1-8

I charge you in the presence of God and of Christ Jesus,
who will judge the living and the dead,
and by his appearing and his kingly power:
proclaim the word;
be persistent whether it is convenient or inconvenient;
convince, reprimand,
encourage through all patience and teaching.
For the time will come
when people will not tolerate sound doctrine
but, following their own desires and insatiable curiosity,
will accumulate teachers
and will stop listening to the truth
and will be diverted to myths.
But you, be self-possessed in all circumstances;
put up with hardship;
perform the work of an evangelist;
fulfill your ministry.
For I am already being poured out like a libation,
and the time of my departure is at hand.
I have competed well;
I have finished the race;
I have kept the faith.
From now on the crown of righteousness awaits me,
which the Lord, the just judge,
will award to me on that day,
and not only to me,
but to all who have longed for his appearance.

Sometimes God uses a drastic method to get our attention. That’s what happened to an awful man named Saul.

Born c. AD 5 in the Mediterranean city of Tarsus (in today’s south-central Turkey), Saul was a Hebrew of the tribe of Benjamin, whose father and grandfather were Pharisees.

An approximate contemporary of the twelve Apostles, Saul neither followed nor even saw Jesus preach. Instead, being a zealot for Jewish law and traditions, he saw Jesus’ disciples as enemy and dedicated himself to the persecution of the early Christians, most notably the killing by stoning of St. Stephen.

When Saul was in his late 20s, as he was approaching Damascus from Jerusalem on a mission to arrest all Christian Jews in Damascus, he and his company were struck by a great light and fell to the ground. Saul alone heard a voice: “Saul, Saul, why do you persecute me?” Saul asked the voice to identify  himself. The voice answered, “Jesus of Nazareth, whom you persecute.” Trembling, Saul cried out, “Lord, what will you have me to do?” The resurrected Christ told Saul that in Damascus, he would learn what would be expected of him.

As Saul got off the ground, he realized he had become blind. He was led to Damascus, where he remained blind for three days, without eating or drinking.
Like all genuine encounters with God — including our own, should we be so graced — Saul’s dramatic encounter with the risen Christ changed him forever.

Now renamed Paul (which means Little), not only did he stop persecuting Christians, he became a devoted follower of Christ, perhaps the most influential early Christian missionary. The first Christology — doctrines and theories of the meaning of the belief in Christ — was developed by Paul.

More importantly, more than any of Christ’s disciples, it was Paul who fully understood that, by His incarnation, death and resurrection, Jesus replaced the convenant of the Old Testament with a new convenant. This was made clear by Christ Himself in the Last Supper:

“This cup is the new covenant in my blood. Do this, as often as you drink it, in remembrance of me” (1 Cor 11.25; cf. Mt 26.27-29; Mk 14.24, Lk 22.20; Heb 8.6, 9.15)

Henceforth, God’s chosen are all who “take up their cross” and follow Jesus the Christ. In other words, what once was a tribal religion — Judaism — is now superceded by the universal faith of Christianity.

That is why St. Paul is called the “Apostle to the Gentiles.” Without the work of Paul, formerly the sinful Saul of Tarsus, you and I might not be Christians.

Paul was beaten, arrested and imprisoned on more than one occasion. Neither the Bible nor other sources say how or when Paul died, but Ignatius, probably around 110, wrote that Paul was martyred. According to Christian tradition, St. Paul was beheaded in Rome during the reign of Nero, on June 29, AD 67 — the same day as St. Peter was crucified upside down.

Shortly before he was martyred, St. Paul had written to St. Timothy these famous words:

“I am even now ready to be sacrificed, and the time of my dissolution is at hand. I have fought a good fight; I have finished my course; I have kept the faith. As for the rest, there is laid up for me a crown of justice which the Lord, the just judge, will render to me in that day: and not only to me, but to them also that love His coming.”

For all these reasons — the sinful pre-conversion Saul, the Apostle to the Gentiles, teaching us about Jesus’ New Covenant — I love St. Paul with all my heart. I hope that, should our time darken to that point when Christians are persecuted as in the days of the early Church, I too will “finish my course,” “keep my faith,” and stand “ready to be sacrificed.”

I now conclude this “Sunday Devotional” with my favorite passage from St. Paul (letter to the Ephesians 6:10-16):

Finally, draw your strength from the Lord and from his mighty power. Put on the armor of God so that you may be able to stand firm against the tactics of the devil. For our struggle is not with flesh and blood but with the principalities, with the powers, with the world rulers of this present darkness, with the evil spirits in the heavens. Therefore, put on the armor of God, that you may be able to resist on the evil day and, having done everything, to hold your ground. So stand fast with your loins girded in truth, clothed with righteousness as a breastplate, and your feet shod in readiness for the gospel of peace. In all circumstances, hold faith as a shield, to quench all the flaming arrows of the evil one.

May the peace and love of our Lord Jesus Christ be with you,

~Eowyn

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Sunday Devotional: Pray Always

Luke 18:1-8

Jesus told his disciples a parable
about the necessity for them to pray always without becoming weary.
He said, “There was a judge in a certain town
who neither feared God nor respected any human being.
And a widow in that town used to come to him and say,
‘Render a just decision for me against my adversary.’
For a long time the judge was unwilling, but eventually he thought,
‘While it is true that I neither fear God nor respect any human being,
because this widow keeps bothering me
I shall deliver a just decision for her
lest she finally come and strike me.'”
The Lord said, “Pay attention to what the dishonest judge says.
Will not God then secure the rights of his chosen ones
who call out to him day and night?
Will he be slow to answer them?
I tell you, he will see to it that justice is done for them speedily.
But when the Son of Man comes, will he find faith on earth?”

Did you know these benefits of praying? —

  • Regular prayer and meditation has been shown in numerous scientific studies to be an important factor in living longer, reducing stress, coping better with sickness, and staying healthy. (allnurses)
  • When we pray, our heart rate slows down, blood pressure goes down, and our breath becomes calmer and more regular.
  • Those who attended religious services at least once a week and prayed at least once a day or studied the Bible frequently were 40% less likely to have high blood pressure, according to a study funded by the National Institutes of Health. (NCBI)
  • Praying helps patients heal, according to a study by Dr. Andrew Newberg of Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia. (NBC News)
  • Praying helps people have fewer migrane headaches and an increase in pain tolerance, according to a study by Ken Pargement of Bowling Green State University. (US News and World Report)
  • Praying reduces levels of infidelity and alcohol consumption by helping us maintain self-control, resist temptation and enhance emotional stability, according to a 2013 study by German psychologists at Saarland University and the University of Mannheim. (Daily Mail)

1 Thessalonians 5:16-18

Rejoice always,
pray without ceasing,
in everything give thanks;
for this is the will of God
in Christ Jesus for you.

See also the scientifically-proven benefits of being grateful.

And remember, always, to tell God you love Him with your whole heart, your whole soul, your whole mind, and with all your strength.

May the peace and love of our Lord Jesus Christ be with you!

~Eowyn

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Sunday Devotional: Why we should in *all* circumstances, give thanks

Luke 17:11-19

As Jesus continued his journey to Jerusalem,
he traveled through Samaria and Galilee.
As he was entering a village, ten lepers met him.
They stood at a distance from him and raised their voices, saying,
“Jesus, Master!  Have pity on us!”
And when he saw them, he said,
“Go show yourselves to the priests.”
As they were going they were cleansed.
And one of them, realizing he had been healed,
returned, glorifying God in a loud voice;
and he fell at the feet of Jesus and thanked him.
He was a Samaritan.
Jesus said in reply,
“Ten were cleansed, were they not?
Where are the other nine?
Has none but this foreigner returned to give thanks to God?”
Then he said to him, “Stand up and go;
your faith has saved you.”

The human condition is that of suffering.

In one month, I lost the two most important and most loved persons in my life. The losses are immeasurable and my grief ocean-deep. There are times when I have felt abandoned by God.

But then I remind myself of what St. Paul — who was beaten, arrested and imprisoned on more than one occasion, and who was martyred (beheaded) on June 29, AD 67 — said in 1 Thessalonians 5:18:

In all circumstances, give thanks,
for this is the will of God for you in Christ Jesus.

For indeed, despite whatever travails and suffering that afflict us, there is still so much for which we have to thank, beginning with the fact that we are still alive.

Not only is it right and true to thank God for our very lives and for His many other gifts (can you count and enumerate yours?), being thankful actually benefits us in at least seven scientifically-proven ways:

  1. Gratitude is good for our physical health: Grateful people experience fewer aches and pains and they report feeling healthier than other people, according to a 2012 study published in Personality and Individual Differences. Grateful people are also more likely to take care of their health — they exercise more often and are more likely to get regular check-ups.
  2. Gratitude is good for our psychological health: Gratitude reduces a multitude of toxic emotions, ranging from envy and resentment to frustration and regret. Robert A. Emmons, Ph.D., a leading gratitude researcher, found that gratitude increases happiness and reduces depression.
  3. Gratitude reduces stress and makes us more resilient: For years, research has shown gratitude not only reduces stress, but it may also play a major role in overcoming trauma by making us more resilient:
    • A 2006 study published in Behavior Research and Therapy found that Vietnam War veterans with higher levels of gratitude experienced lower rates of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder.
    • Recognizing all you have to be thankful for – even during the worst times of your life – also fosters resilience, enabling you to better withstand trauma and stress. A 2003 study published in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology found that gratitude was a major contributor to resilience following the 9/11 attacks.
  4. Grateful people sleep better: Writing in a gratitude journal improves sleep, according to a 2011 study published in Applied Psychology: Health and Well-Being. Jotting down a few grateful sentiments before bed helps you sleep better and longer.
  5. Gratitude opens the door to friendship: Showing appreciation to other people can help you win new friends, according to a 2014 study published in Emotion. The study found that thanking a new acquaintance makes them more likely to seek an ongoing relationship.
  6. Gratitude improves self-esteem: A 2014 study published in the Journal of Applied Sport Psychology found that gratitude increased athletes’ self-esteem, which is an essential component to optimal performance. Other studies have shown that gratitude makes us better able to appreciate other people’s accomplishments, and reduces social comparisons which makes us resentful toward people who seem to have more than we have — whether more money, better jobs, better health, or more friends.
  7. Gratitude is good for society by enhancing empathy and reducing aggression: Grateful people are more likely to behave in a pro-social manner according to a 2012 study by the University of Kentucky. Study participants who ranked higher on gratitude scales were sensitive and empathic toward other people; less vengeful; and less likely to retaliate against others, even when given negative feedback.

I know how difficult it is to be thankful when we are in the throes of great suffering. But I will now make a list of all the many, many things for which I am grateful. I invite you to make a list as well.

And remember, always: “In all circumstances, give thanks, for this is the will of God for you in Christ Jesus.” 

May the peace and love of Jesus Christ our Lord be with you,

~Eowyn

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High school declines free Chick-fil-A lunch because of their LGBT views

Stories like this just prompt us to visit CFA, which we’ll be doing today for lunch.

From Fox News: The principal of a New Orleans high school said his staffers have no desire to “eat mor chikin,” as the administrator turned down a free lunch for teachers catered by Chick-fil-A over what he alleges are the company’s “views” toward the LGBTQ community.

On Oct. 10, Steven Corbett, principal of Lusher High School, said that he had recently declined a free lunch from the chicken-centric chain for his employees, provided through the College Football Playoff Foundation (CFPF), explaining that the restaurant’s values do not align with those of the school.

“Out of respect to our LGBTQ staff, we have chosen to not serve Chick-fil-A at an employee lunch. The #1 rule at Lusher is to ‘Be Kind’ and we live this motto every day,” Corbett told WWL-TV. “Chick-fil-A has been politically outspoken about its views, and we feel it is not part of Lusher’s culture of kindness and community.”

“Anytime an organization is anti-LGBTQ, and has efforts to infringe upon their rights, we thought it was important to support and stand up for their community at this time,” the principal told WDSU, doubling down on his argument.

The catered lunch was reportedly scheduled to take place on Friday, according to WWL-TV.

In response, a spokesperson for the CFPF said that the organization understood, and that teachers at the charter school would receive a meal from another restaurant. “[We are just] glad teachers will have a good lunch tomorrow,” spokesperson Tony Fay said.

Fay added that the teacher’s lunch for Lusher High School staff is one of “several” initiatives the CFPF is launching to thank the New Orleans community for hosting the Sugar Bowl and College Football Championship in 2020.

Read the whole story here.

DCG

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