Category Archives: Atheists

Racial, gender, age, education and religious differences in 2018 midterm elections

Using exit poll data by the National Election Pool, as reported by CNN, Pew Research Center determined that “The stark demographic and educational divisions that have come to define
American politics were clearly evident in voting preferences in the
2018 congressional elections.”

Reporting for Pew on November 8, 2018, Alec Tyson describes those divisions:

  • Nationally, voters favored Democratic candidates for Congress over
    Republican candidates by a margin of about 7%.
  • Gender: Women generally favored Democratic candidates by 19% (59% to 40%) while men voted for Republicans 51% to
    47%. As was the case in the 2016 presidential election, white men voted
    Republican by a wide margin (60% to 39%) while white women were evenly divided
    (49% favored Democrats; 49% supported Republicans).
  • Race: Whereas Whites favored Republicans over Democrats by 54% vs. 44%, Blacks voted overwhelmingly (90%) for Democrats,
    including comparable shares of black men (88%) and black women (92%). Hispanics favored Democrats over Republicans 69% v. 29%. Asians favored Democrats over Republicans 77% v. 23%.
  • College education: When gender, race and education are considered together, women college
    graduates stand out for their strong preference for the Democratic
    candidate (59% favored the Democrat while just 39% voted Republican).
    Whites with less education – particularly men – supported the
    Republican. White men who do not have a college degree voted Republican
    by about two-to-one (66% to 32%).
  • Age: The age divide in voting, which barely existed in the early 2000s, also
    is large. Majorities of voters ages 18 to 29 (67%) and 30 to 44 (58%)
    favored the Democratic candidate. Voters ages 45 and older were divided
    (50% Republican, 49% Democrat).
  • Trump: The national exit poll found that more voters said their midterm vote
    was to oppose Trump (38%) than said it was to support him (26%); 33%
    said Trump was not a factor in their vote. The midterm vote also was
    highly correlated with views of Trump’s job performance: Among those who
    approved of the president (45% of all voters), 88% voted for the
    Republican. Among the larger share who disapproved (54%), an
    overwhelming percentage voted Democratic (90%).
  • Anti-White: Overall, 41% of voters said whites in the country today are favored over
    minorities; 19% said that minorities are favored over whites, while 33%
    said that no group is favored.  Among those who said whites are favored in the U.S., 87% voted for
    Democrats. By contrast, large majorities of those who said minorities
    are favored (85%) or that no group is favored (69%) voted for Republican
    candidates.
  • #MeToo: 72% of those who said sexual harassment it is a very serious problem supported Democratic
    candidates. Among those who said it was a somewhat serious problem,
    Republican candidates held a slim edge (50% vs. 48%). And while
    relatively few voters said sexual harassment is not too serious a
    problem (11%), this group voted overwhelmingly Republican (79% vs. 20%).

In a report on November 7, 2018, Pew Research found that “A preliminary analysis of the 2018 midterm elections finds considerable
continuity from 2014 and 2010 in the voting patterns of several key religious groups“:

  • Three-quarters (75%) of white voters who describe themselves as
    evangelical or born-again Christians (a group that includes Protestants,
    Catholics and members of other faiths) voted for Republican House
    candidates.
  • 7-in-10 no religions voted for the Democratic candidate in their congressional district.
  • 8-in-10 Jewish voters (79%) cast their ballots for Democrats.
  • This year, Catholic voters were evenly split between the parties: 50%
    favored the Democratic candidate for Congress in their district, while
    49% favored the GOP’s nominee. In the past two midterm elections (2014
    and 2010), however, Catholics had favored Republican candidates by margins
    of roughly 10%.
  • Among Protestants, 56% voted for Republican congressional candidates and
    42% backed Democrats.
  • Among those who identify with faiths other than
    Christianity and Judaism
    (including Muslims, Buddhists, Hindus and many
    others), 73% voted for Democratic congressional candidates while 25%
    supported Republicans.
  • Church attendance: Voters who say they attend religious services at least once a week
    backed Republican candidates over Democrats in their congressional
    districts by an 18-point margin. Those who attend services less often
    tilted in favor of the Democratic Party, including two-thirds (68%) of those who say they never attend worship services.

~Eowyn

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Religious people live 4 years longer than atheists

Four days ago, I posted about church attendance reducing suicide risk by half.
Here is more evidence that being a Christian is good for our health, both mental and physical.

The lonely world of atheists

A study by a team of researchers found a surprising correlation between longevity and religious faith: religious people live up to four years longer than atheists.
Published on June 13, 2018 in the journal Social Psychological and Personality Science, the article “Does Religion Stave Off the Grave? Religious Affiliation in One’s Obituary and Longevity” was authored by:

  1. Laura Wallace, the lead author, is a doctoral student of psychology at Ohio State University (OSU).
  2. Rebecca Anthony, who is in her final year of medical school at OSU.
  3. Dr. Christian End, associate professor of psychology at Xavier University.
  4. Dr. Baldwin Way, associate professor of psychology at OSU.

As summarized by a press release from Ohio State University, the study employed two samples of obituaries;

  1. A first sample of 505 obituaries published in Iowa’s Des Moines Register  in January and February 2012, showed that people with religious affiliations lived 9.45 years longer than atheists. The gap in longevity shrank to 6.48 years when gender and marital status were taken into account.
  2. A second sample of 1,096 obituaries from 42 major U.S. cities published on newspaper websites between August 2010 and August 2011, found that people whose obits mentioned a religious affiliation lived an average of 5.64 years longer than those whose obits did not. That gap shrank to 3.82 years after gender and marital status were considered.

The researchers tried to account for these likely explanatory (or “contaminating”) factors:

  • Many studies have shown that people who volunteer and participate in social groups tend to live longer than others. As an example, attending church regularly increases the odds of becoming friends with other attendees. Wallace et al. combined data from both samples and determined that volunteerism and social engagement only partly accounted for the greater longevity of religious people. Wallace said: “We found that volunteerism and involvement in social organizations only accounted for a little less than one year of the longevity boost that religious affiliation provided. There’s still a lot of the benefit of religious affiliation that this can’t explain.”
  • What about the importance that many religions place on conformity to community values and norms? The researchers found that in highly religious cities where conformity was important, religious people tended to live longer than non-religious people.

Other possible explanatory factors:

  • The researchers allowed that the longevity effect of religious affiliation may have to do with the rules and norms of many religions restricting unhealthy practices such as alcohol, drug use and sexual promiscuity.
  • In addition, Dr. Way said, “many religions promote stress-reducing practices that may improve health, such as gratitude, prayer or meditation.”
  • Way also admitted that the study could not control for important factors related to longevity such as race and health behaviors.

Nevertheless, lead author Wallace said that overall, the study provides additional support to the growing number of studies showing that religion does have a positive effect on health.
See also:

~Eowyn

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Church attendance reduces suicide risk by half

The recent spate of “celebrity” suicides by hanging — actor Robin Williams in 2014; fashion designer Kate Spade and “celebrity chef” Anthony Bourdain this month — are famous examples of the 25% increase in U.S. suicides since 1999.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) documented a steep rise in suicides in the United States between 1994 and 2014, among men and women and in all age groups between 10 and 74. Although women are still less likely than men to commit suicide, the gender suicide-gap is closing. Among women between 45 and 64 — the ages at which women are most likely to kill themselves — the rate of suicide in 2014 dramatically increased 80% from 1999.
Speculations abound about the suicides of Spade and Bourdain:

  • Were they depressed from relationship failures? –Spade and her mouse-mask wearing husband were separated; Bourdain might have been dumped by his satanic girlfriend Asia Argento.
  • Was it a case of auto erotic-asphyxiation?
  • Was Bourdain Arkancided (just because he said in a tweet that Hillary Clinton’s operatives harassed him for joining the #MeToo movement against criminally-prosecuted Hellywood mogul Harvey Weinstein?)

There is one thing that Williams, Spade and Bourdain all had in common: They did not have the Light of Christ. Williams and Bourdain were Jews; Spade, who graduated from a Catholic all-girls high school, was not observant.

St. Paul said in his Letter to the Ephesians 6:10-16:

Finally, draw your strength from the Lord and from his mighty power. Put on the armor of God so that you may be able to stand firm against the tactics of the devil. For our struggle is not with flesh and blood but with the principalities, with the powers, with the world rulers of this present darkness, with the evil spirits in the heavens. Therefore, put on the armor of God, that you may be able to resist on the evil day and, having done everything, to hold your ground. So stand fast with your loins girded in truth, clothed with righteousness as a breastplate, and your feet shod in readiness for the gospel of peace. In all circumstances, hold faith as a shield, to quench all the flaming arrows of the evil one.

A study by a team of researchers led by Tyler J. VanderWeele of Harvard’s T.H. Chan School of Public Health, confirms the correctness of St. Paul’s injunction.
Published in the August 2016 issue of JAMA Psychiatry, “Association Between Religious Service Attendance and Lower Suicide Rates Among US Women,” the study found that mmidst the wave of despair and suicide, one group of women are bucking the national trend.
Melissa Healy reports for the Los Angeles Times that, using data from 1996 to 2010, the study found the following stunning facts:

  1. Compared with women who never participated in religious services, women who attended any religious service once a week or more were five times less likely to commit suicide. In a study population made up of 89,708 nurses aged 30 to 55, and dominated by women who identified themselves as either Catholic or Protestant, the suicide rate observed was about half that for U.S. women as a whole — only 36 of them committed suicide at some point in the course of 15 years.
  2. Which church, Protestant or Catholic, matters. Although Protestant women who worshiped weekly at church were far less likely to take their own lives than women who seldom or never went to church, Catholic women were even less likely — seven times less likely to commit suicide than Protestant women.
  3. How often one attends church also matters: Among especially devout Catholic women, suicides were non-existent. There was not a single suicide among the 6,999 Catholic women who said they attended Mass more than once a week.
  4. It’s not whether one is Christian; it’s about church attendance: The suicide-prevention effect of religion was clearly not a simple matter of group identity: Self-identified Catholics who never attended mass committed suicide nearly as often as did women of any religion who were not active worshipers.

The study’s authors concluded that church attendance is “a form of meaningful social participation” that buffers women against loneliness and isolation — both factors that are strongly implicated in depression and suicide — and that “Religion and spirituality may be an underappreciated resource that psychiatrists and clinicians could explore with their patients, as appropriate.”
Dr. Aaron Kheriaty, director of the medical ethics program at the University of California, Irvine, School of Medicine, and co-author of The Catholic Guide to Depression, said the lengthy duration of the 2016 study — women were asked about their religious attendance every two years starting in 1996 and then followed until 2010 — “suggests a causal relationship between religious practice and a significantly lower risk of suicide, especially among Catholics“:

“Religious convictions and practices can help people foster a sense of hope, even in the midst of major crises or adversities. Religious faith can help people find a sense of meaning and purpose even in suffering. It’s not our role to ‘prescribe’ religion… or proselytize to our patients. It is safe to assume that religious conviction and faith must be genuine and sincere if they are to provide the mental and physical health benefits that several studies have suggested. [But if patients are inclined to explore religion or spirituality,] doctors can encourage patients to explore such activities confident that religious practices will likely not harm, and may indeed, help, their patient’s mental health.”

The 2016 study confirms and adds to recent research on the potential benefits of religiosity, contrary to Sigmund Freud’s sneering denunciation of religious belief as the “universal obsessional neurosis of humanity.”

See also:

~Eowyn

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Deepening Understanding of the Creation

Most know the Genesis account of Creation. What is not as widely known is that there are a number of other biblical references to the Creation that broaden and deepen our understanding of the world and our human condition. 

The Supremacy of the Son of God

The Son is the image of the invisible God, the firstborn over all creation. For in him all things were created: things in heaven and on earth, visible and invisible, whether thrones or powers or rulers or authorities; all things have been created through him and for him. He is before all things, and in him all things hold together. And he is the head of the body, the church; he is the beginning and the firstborn from among the dead, so that in everything he might have the supremacy. For God was pleased to have all his fullness dwell in him, and through him to reconcile to himself all things, whether things on earth or things in heaven, by making peace through his blood, shed on the cross.
– Colossians 1 verses 15-20


Origins – Darwin vs the Bible 

A wise teacher spoke years ago about the debate between Atheists and Christians in their methods of examining how things came to be.

The Atheist says,
“I must understand, in order that I might believe.”

The Christian says,
“I must believe, in order that I might understand.”

This can seem a frustrating thing, but both the Atheist and the Christian always starts with some kind of faith assumption, or pre-supposition, from which to build understanding.
If we choose the Atheist’s way, we plod along waiting for each piece of the puzzle to make sense. In Darwin’s case, each new piece of evidence served to erode his theory of origins.
If we choose the Christian’s way, we are ushered into revelations of the deepest inner workings of things, like the passage above in St. Paul’s letter to the Christians at Colossai.
My message to the atheists is, continue your research by all means, but please consider the invitation of of the gospel to fast-track your understanding of things through faith in Jesus Christ, while continuing your research into the countless scientific details. In believing, you will be amazed at what you come to understand. It will require faith, but not without reason.

 
 

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Sunday Devotional: Making fishers of men in a time of declining church attendance

Mark 1:14-20

After John had been arrested,
Jesus came to Galilee proclaiming the gospel of God:
“This is the time of fulfillment.
The kingdom of God is at hand.
Repent, and believe in the gospel.”

As he passed by the Sea of Galilee,
he saw Simon and his brother Andrew casting their nets into the sea;
they were fishermen.
Jesus said to them,
“Come after me, and I will make you fishers of men.”
Then they abandoned their nets and followed him.
He walked along a little farther
and saw James, the son of Zebedee, and his brother John.
They too were in a boat mending their nets.
Then he called them.
So they left their father Zebedee in the boat
along with the hired men and followed him.


There are so many things left unsaid and unexplained in the Gospel accounts of Christ: Why are there no descriptions of what our Lord looked like? Why are the accounts of His childhood so sparse? The child Jesus’ life must have been fraught with danger, for surely King Herod did not stop trying to kill the remarkable infant who had inspired the three Magis to journey from afar with precious gifts for the baby born in a humble manger. And why was Jesus’ public ministry so brief, lasting but three years?
Knowing His time would be brief, Jesus began His public ministry by gathering a small group of followers — the Apostles — whom He deputized to be “fishers of men” who would continue His ministry and spread His word far and wide.
Though most of us are not priests, ministers and preachers, as believers we each had heeded His call and, as followers of Christ, are asked to spread the good word (which is what “gospel” means).
Our task is all the more urgent because the Light of Christ is dimming in America, one of the more religious countries in the world.
In a report for Breitbart, Jan. 3, 2018, Dr. Thomas D. Williams alerts us to a 2015 study by the Pew Research Center, which found that:

  • The United States has experienced an alarming dip in Christian religiosity over the last decade, whereas Islam, Hinduism, and “other religions” show no decline.
  • Mainline Christianity and Catholicism have fallen 3.4% and 3.1%, respectively.

While there are Christians who reject and dismiss organized Christianity, arguing that faith alone is suffice, without need of attending and belonging to a church, the plain fact is that we have decades of data that regular church attendance confers beneficial effects on both individuals and society. As John Stonestreet, president of the Colson Center for Christian Worldview, put it, the advantages of regular religious practice are so well documented that people would be foolish not to consider them.
Personal and societal benefits of regular church attendance include:
(1) A longer and healthier life: Religious people live longer than the non-religious by 2 to 3 years. One reason is that religion encourages a healthier lifestyle: Compared to non-churchgoers, regular churchgoers tend to drink, smoke and use recreational drugs less, and are also less likely to be sexually promiscuous.
(2) Psychological well being: Regular church attendance strengthens social ties and create communities where people take care of one another. A study of 15,738 Americans between the ages of 18 and 60 by the Austin Institute for the Study of Family and Culture, found that:

  • People who attend religious services on a weekly basis are happier: They are nearly twice as likely (45%) to describe themselves as “very happy”  than people who never attend (28%).
  • Conversely, those who never worship are twice as likely to say they are “very unhappy” (4%) as those who attend services weekly (2%).
  • Higher levels of church attendance predict greater life satisfaction.
  • Not just church attendance, but self-reported “religiosity” and religious “affiliation” are also linked with happiness levels.

(3) Children who are high-achieving, social, and well adjusted. According to sociologist Robert Putnam in his book, Our Kids: The American Dream in Crisis:

  • A child whose parents attend church regularly is 40% to 50% more likely to go on to college than a matched child of non-attenders.
  • Children involved in a religious organization take tougher courses, get higher grades and test scores, and are less likely to drop out of high school — which means they also have better employment prospects.
  • Religious youth have better relations with their parents and other adults, more friendships with high-performing peers, and are more involved in sports and other extracurricular activities.

(4) It goes without saying that America as a society reaps benefits from healthy, happy, high-achieving and social individuals. A recent study by Brian and Melissa Grim of Georgetown University and the Newseum Institute, even placed a dollar value on the benefits of regular church attendance. The study concluded that the “value of the services provided by religious organizations and the impact religion has on a number of important American businesses” totals $1.2 trillion.
One troubling aspect of regular church attendance is an increasing class gap or division:

  • Contrary to a commonly held belief that irreligiosity tends to rise with education and income, regular church attendance among college-educated families has remained more or less the same since the late 1970s, but has fallen by almost a third among families with a high school diploma or less. According to Putnam, this disparity has created “a substantial class gap” that did not exist 50 years ago.
  • Statistics from the Pew Center’s comprehensive 2015 report on religion in America confirmed that most religious “nones” tend to be:
    • Less educated: only a small portion have a college degree; 45% have a high school diploma or less.
    • Poorer: earn less than $30,000 a year,
    • White males.

And so, with Matthew 4:19’s injunction of making fishers of men in mind, how do we spread the good word in our time of declining faith and church attendance, in a culture of increasing hostility and enmity toward Christianity and Christians?
May the peace and love of Jesus Christ our Lord be with you,
~Eowyn

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Darwinism Produces Racism and Eugenics

The untold legacy of Charles Darwin

A bad tree cannot bear good fruit

Hank Hanegraaff delivers a scorching analysis of Charles Darwin.

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Global Atheist Convention cancelled for lack of interest


A Global Atheist Convention was supposed to be held next February in Melbourne, Australia, but it’s been cancelled due to lack of interest.
In a commentary for The Sydney Morning Herald, November 8, 2017, Dr.  Michael Jensen, rector of St Mark’s Anglican Church in Darling Point, Australia, writes:

“Reason to Hope”, the third Global Atheist Convention scheduled for Melbourne in February 2018, has been cancelled because of “lack of interest” (according to my sources).

The conference was scheduled to be headlined by two famous atheists: novelist Salmon Rushdie, 70, and English evolutionary biologist Richard Dawkins, 76.

Richard Dawkins


Aside from his epistemological arrogance in claiming to know a negative — that God doesn’t exist — Dawkins is also known for saying there’s nothing wrong with pedophilia and that it’s our moral duty to kill the mentally retarded.
See also:

~Eowyn

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Sunday Mirror: ‘2001 Space Odyssey’ atheist science fiction writer Arthur C. Clarke was a pedophile

Arthur C. Clarke (1917-2008) was a celebrated British science fiction writer who became very famous when one of his books was made into the 1968 movie, 2001: A Space Odyssey, directed by Stanley Kubrick. Clarke was one of the “Big Three” of science fiction; the other two were Robert Heinlein and Issac Asimov.
An atheist who once said “I don’t believe in God or an afterlife,” Clarke was hostile to religion. He said that “One of the great tragedies of mankind is that morality has been hijacked by religion” and that religion is the “Most malevolent and persistent of all mind viruses. We should get rid of it as quick as we can.”
I had thought it curious that Clarke, a Brit, emigrated to Sri Lanka (formerly Ceylon) — a desperately poor country in S.E. Asia where the average per capita GDP in 1961 was US$582. There he lived for most of his life from 1956 until his death 52 years later in 2008 — a world-famous foreigner who was made chancellor of the Meratuwa University and to whom the government conferred tax-free status. We are told his move was “largely to pursue his interest in scuba diving,” but in his biography of Stanley Kubrick, author John Baxter cites Clarke’s homosexuality as a reason for his emigration, due to Sri Lanka’s more tolerant laws with regard to homosexuality.

I was once a scifi fan and had read Clarke’s books, including his much-lauded 1953 novel, Childhood’s End, and was repulsed by it. The book was an expansion of Clarke’s short story, Guardian Angel — about the arrival on Earth of mysterious but benign aliens who had been humanity’s guardians, which began a golden age of utopia on Earth. But the benign “Overlords” refused to reveal themselves to humanity, promising they would do so after 50 years when humans have become used to their presence. It turns out that humanity’s virtuous guardians look like the traditional Christian image of the devil: large bipeds with cloven hooves, leathery wings, horns, and tails.
In other words, Clarke’s beneficent devils are a variation on the notion that the much-maligned Lucifer, the “morning star,” is actually a benevolent and well-meaning being who brought knowledge, enlightenment and civilization to mankind.

Now, I finally know why Clarke moved to Sri Lanka and why I find Childhood’s End so repugnant.
The BBC reports that mere days before Prince Charles’ knighting of Arthur C. Clarke on February 4, 1998, the London Sunday Mirror had published a story that Clarke, then 80 years old, was a pedophile.
The Sunday Mirror story was a purported interview with Clarke in his Sri Lanka home, in which he said there’s nothing wrong with an adult having sex with children who’ve reached puberty. Clarke is quoted as saying:

Once they have reached the age of puberty, it is OK… It doesn’t do any harm. I am trying to think of the youngest boy I have ever had because, of course, you can’t tell it here. I think most of the damage comes from the fuss made by hysterical parents afterwards. If the kids don’t mind, fair enough.

The Sunday Mirror story sparked outraged protests in Sri Lanka.
Referring to a law on prevention of abuse of children below the age of 16 which had been unanimously passed by Sri Lanka’s parliament in October 1995, Maureen Seneviratne, co-ordinator of a children’s rights NGO called Peace (Protection of Environment and Children Everywhere), said, “I am amazed why the law has not been enforced as far as Clarke was concerned. Why do we have strong laws in Sri Lanka?”. Under the new law, which was put in place after a public outcry over pedophilia and child prostitution, pedophilia of a child under the age of 16 carries a minimum sentence of seven years imprisonment and a maximum of 20 years.
Seneviratne said her group had heard rumors about Clarke’s pedophile activities, but being a small NGO, her organization could not take it up as that would be like ”tilting at giants who have written books and been made chancellors of universities. It would have been like signing our own death warrant.”
According to Peter Popham of the UK Independent, Clarke claimed he had not been sexually active for 20 years. But the head of current affairs at the Sri Lankan Broadcasting Company — a friend of Clarke — said Clarke was still having sex with boys “a few months ago”.
Popham wrote:

“There are seedy aspects of foreign involvement with Sri Lanka. Elsewhere in Asia, paedophilia means sex tourism. In Sri Lanka some Europeans have come into the country posing – and even performing – as businessmen or philanthropists. They set up homes close to the idyllic west or south coast beaches, and also close to communities of impoverished former fishermen. They then win the trust of local boys and begin abusing them, paying them tiny sums of money in return.
A German man is serving a two-year sentence and two other cases are going through the courts, and up to 100 suspected paedophiles are deported every year. […]
Clarke has indeed been a wonderful fairy godfather for Sri Lanka. He set up the Arthur Clarke Centre for Modern Technologies 15 years ago with the money he received with a Marconi International Fellowship, and in a country that is still in many cases crushingly poor it is an inspiring success. Thanks to the centre, and Clarke’s generosity with his contacts, many Sri Lankan scientists punch well above their nation’s weight in research and development.”

Seneviratne said as many as 7,000 children were involved at any one time in Sri Lanka’s sex trade:

“Previous governments didn’t even look into it, because all they were concerned about was tourism. When we began working on the problem six years ago people thought the foreign paedophile was a wonderful fairy godfather giving out presents – so why were we rocking the boat? People were only outraged when the facts were brought to light.”

Here’s a thought: The Sunday Mirror is a UK newspaper, and libel laws there make it much easier to sue publications than in the U.S. But Clarke didn’t sue. The BBC also reported that the Sunday Mirror said they have the tape of the interview.
Bizarrely, around the same time as the Sunday Mirror‘s story on Arthur C. Clarke, David Asimov, son of the late Isaac Asimov — one of science fiction’s Big Three — was arrested for possession of child porn.
Luke Reiter reports for ZDnet that on March 5, 1998, California’s Santa Rosa Police Department arrested David Asimov, 46, and seized more than 4,000 computer disks and videotapes from his Bennett Ridge home. Asimov was charged with four federal counts of possession of child pornography with each count carrying a five year sentence.
Sonoma County Deputy District Attorney Gary Medvigy said:

“There were thousands of disks, thousands of videos. Anything imaginable regarding sex between human beings and human beings, or human beings and animals, was there. Whatever your imagination can conjure up, he had it.”

On March 28, 2001, after David Asimov pled guilty to two counts in a plea bargain deal, U.S. District Court Judge Maxine M. Chesney sentenced him to only six months’ home detention with electronic monitoring and three years’ probation for possessing child pornography.
According to Phil Jayhan of LetsRollForums, “Asimov’s child porn stash was so big many child victims and perpetrators would have taken a fall, had Asimov been zealously prosecuted at trial.”
H/t independenceday of Voat
~Eowyn

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Nurses who saw supernatural phenomena around dying patients

“The Lord himself goes before you and will be with you; he will never leave you nor forsake you. Do not be afraid; do not be discouraged.” –Deuteronomy 31:8

allnurses.com is a social-network website for nurses. It describes itself as:

“the collective voice of the nursing community, supporting the profession by providing a place where nurses can network, share, and learn from their peers. With an ever-growing community of registered nurses, allnurses is the go-to place to communicate and discuss nursing, jobs, schools, NCLEX, careers, and so much more.”

In July 2015, a nurse asked if anyone has seen something supernatural when a patient is near death or in the process of dying.
Aside from a few responses from atheists who mocked the question, most responses were eyewitness accounts of having seen what may be supernatural phenomena.
Ruby Vee, BSN, RN wrote on July 4, 2015:

“The old building, where our unit used to be located, has been converted to offices. There’s one office that is perpetually empty — no one will use it for long. Maybe it’s coincidence, but the location of that office coincides with the location of an old ICU room that we all swear was haunted . . . . “

canigraduate, RN, July 4, 2015:

“I think a lot of hospitals are haunted. I don’t have the gene to perceive this stuff, but a lot of my former patients did.
It used to creep me out when I’d have patients ask me who the strangers in their room were, when the only person there was me.
A few asked what the children down the hall were giggling about (no peds and no visitor kids).
One elderly lady told me she saw her mama walking toward her and it was time for her to go home. She died within the hour.
There was one room that a had wild call bell that would randomly go off, no matter how many times they rewired the room.
There was one morgue that I swear was haunted. This is the only time I perceived the weirdness myself. Whenever I would make a deposit, I swear I heard laughter. I stopped going down there by myself. I had a coworker try to pawn the sound off on gas release. Nope, I can tell the difference between a fart and a laugh. I’m getting chills just thinking about it.”

LittleMissKat, CNA, July 4, 2015:

“I used to work at a nursing home before I was hired at a hospital and we had this one little old lady who was blind and she liked to get up every day at 2/3 in the morning. Well one morning I was getting her up into her wheelchair when she looked behind me and asked who that young man was sitting on the bed.
Creeped me out because 1) she’s blind and 2) there used to be a young man in there who had passed away…
At the hospital we also get a bunch of older dying patients who ask about the children in the hall… It’s the adult side of the hospital and there are no kids around.”

Purple_roses, ADN, RN, July 6, 2015:

“This story didn’t happen to me, but to my coworker. She told me about it when I relieved her shift. We were taking care of a hospice client who was very close to passing. The client said, ‘Go tell my dad I’m ok,’ and then said that her dad was standing outside her open bedroom window. I know that it’s very likely that she was simply hallucinating, but at the same time, I like the idea of loved ones helping you ‘cross over’ (or whatever happens after death). “

ahosoda, July 7, 2015:

“I did some CNA work for a friend of a friend. Her dad was dying and on Hospice, but wanted to die in his home so he had aides come at certain points in the day to take care of him. His daughter didn’t trust the CNAs who came by, so she set up baby monitors all around the house. After seeing those CNAs doing horrible things over the nannycams (neglect, abuse), she hired me to take care of him.
The night he passed away, I was in the kitchen doing dishes and I kept feeling someone tapping on my shoulder. I also felt a lot of unexplainable breezes, and just a warm presence. I thought I was just spooking myself out, until we looked back at the nannycam footage. Cups sliding multiple feet across the counters, and random bursts of white light across the screen, and his dog barking at something that wasn’t there.”

Adele_Michal7, July 8, 2015:

“I had an MD write a STAT order for an exorcism. That was fun. “

TheGooch, July 8, 2015:

“When my Mom was dying she told us that she saw dead relatives.”

proud nurse, BSN, RN, July 9, 2015:

“I worked in LTC for 7 years. It was very common for the residents to see or call out for deceased relatives before they died, whether the death was expected or not. Where I worked, we had cameras everywhere. Sometimes I would just watch the colored monitors and see fuzzy white images floating through the halls.
For weeks after a resident who pretty much ran the unit died, her room was left vacant. This lady was a constant call light user/abuser. We had a panel that lit up with the room number when the call light was pushed. The panel would light up with that room number but it was vacant. We put in work orders to fix that numerous times, but it kept happening.”

Horseshoe, July 9, 2015:

“One day I was chatting with my patient’s son. He mentioned that he had an implanted defibrillator. I said, ‘Yikes. So I’m guessing you arrested at some point?’ He said that he had a cardiac arrest and it had taken 15 minutes for an ambulance to arrive, even though it happened in a restaurant across the street from a hospital! Anyway, two nurses were at the scene and did CPR until the ambulance arrived.
I asked him if he remembered any of the incident and he told me that he had a full blown near death experience where deceased loved ones greeted him to take him to a tunnel, he went through a tunnel and went into a very bright light, and he saw God. He told me ‘imagine the most love and joy and peace you’ve ever experienced, and multiply it times one million.” He said he wanted to stay, but was told it wasn’t his time yet, and he returned to his body. He said ‘I was raised Southern Baptist, but I can say that they’ve got a lot of it wrong.’ I asked, ‘What do you mean?’ He responded, ‘well first of all, everyone goes to Heaven.’ Incredulous, I said, ‘What?! Even murderers and child abusers?’ He said, ‘Yep. But you are confronted with all your actions. Every single one.’
After that, any time I witnessed an arrest and resuscitation, I would ask the patient NOT if he had had a near death experience, but simply if he remembered anything from the arrest. Sometimes they would say no, then other times I would hear about going through tunnels into the light into beautiful meadows or reunions with dead relatives and friends.”

soushee, BSN, RN, July 9, 2015:

“My unit uses tracker devices, all RNs and CNAs wear them. Several nights one week about 6 extra unidentified ‘people’ would appear on the tracker board, and would move from a specific room to the dirty utility, and up and down the ‘back’ hall (unit is a big square with patient rooms on the outside, nurses’ station and clean utility/offices in the core). Scared the CNA who had the back to death and she sat in the main station all night, scared to go back there. Can’t say I blame her! I actually went and check the rooms sometimes to see if anybody was in there, and they were empty. The mysterious trackers would never go in rooms that were occupied.”

GotRhythm, July 9, 2015:

“I work in a Peds CVICU, we had one patient about a year ago who was 23 y/o and post-op conduit replacement. For about 3 days she kept telling her nurses she saw the angel of death standing in the corner, she would even talk to him sometimes.”

TheGooch, July 9, 2015:

“This video is quite interesting.”


missmollie, ADN, RN, July 9, 2015:

“I was working as a CNA, and it was close to 11:30pm when I had to go empty my linen cart. We had this long hallway that my unit was connected to. I took the bin back there, through the double doors that require a code to get in. I’m looking at the bag and tying it, when I saw something out of the corner of my eye.
I turn to look and there is a woman standing there in a nightgown. I sighed, and wondered what hall she came from, and told her I would take her up front. I walk to the doors, put in my code, and turn around to encourage her.
The hall was empty.”

blondy2061h, MSN, RN, July 10, 2017:

“We had a patient in a room on our unit who was doing fairy well. He he kept saying, ‘Bob Jones is asking me to take a walk with him.’ Bob Jones was a patient who had been in that room for a long time nearly a year prior and died in that room. Obviously that wasn’t really his name, that’s the annoynimized version. The name was less common. The wife kept asking us who Bob Jones was and the husband/patient swore he was in the room and why couldn’t we see him? The best we could figure, these patients never met. Predictably, this patient suddenly died.”

rudecat, Aug. 10, 2015:

“While working at a LTC facility on a night shift I was alone and charting and felt a presence and saw an apparition sitting beside be . It was very calm , not frightening and I could make out a woman’s hands folded on the desk beside me watching me chart. As I said, I felt no fear what so ever . Actually, it felt safe somehow . That’s the way I would describe her presence. I found out the next day when I mentioned this to colleagues who had been there much longer than I that there was indeed a spirit but no one knew whom. Thinking it might have been a nurse??? “

GhosttRN, BSN, RN, Aug. 11, 2015:

“In my old hospital we had just one room where the pts [patients] would all call around 1-4 in the am complaining about the kids playing with a ball outside the door and asking us to keep them quiet. Never were any kids but it was an old Peds floor years prior.
On a different floor we had a guy die from CA and it seamed he stuck around in his room and the adjoining room. The call bells for those two rooms would always go off and the beds never stayed made-up when they were empty, like someone was always sitting/laying on the made bed. He would also turn on the water faucet. Really freaked out one of our CNAs one night when she was restocking. She refused to go in there at night after that.”

Carolll, BSN, RN, Jan. 8, 2016:

“The first night that I worked in one of the Hospice Houses, about 3 am I saw someone in a red top walk through the kitchen, I went to look and there was no one there. The next morning, I mentioned it to the cook and she said that the volunteers wore red tops and that it was probably one of them as many had passed. This isn’t new for me though, I’ve always heard and seen things. I questioned my mother before she passed and she told me that they had a dog when I was little that had to be put away, she said that she continued to hear the dog walk around the house and then lay down. She told me that it goes away in about 6 months if you ignore it……she’s come back to visit several times and even left her butt print in her bed once…..”

NanaPoo, RN, Jan. 8, 2016:

“In my 12 years of hospice, both inpatient and home hospice, it was very common to have patients in their last 2 days or so report seeing deceased family members in their room and particularly at the foot of their bed. They would also say they see a beautiful lady or a beautiful angel. All of the patients who had these experiences had professed to be ‘believers’ or Christians prior to the end of their lives….
I’ve been at the bedside of many dying patients who appeared to have a painful and frightening experience but 3 stand out in particular. One was a professed atheist, one was hubby’s family member who was a lifelong Baptist, and one inpatient hospice who was a young cervical CA [cancer] patient whose spiritual status I cannot remember but whose pain was uncontrolled until her demise. Hers was the most unsettling for me as a nurse because I felt my job wasn’t done properly even though her doctor ordered unlimited medication and I stood by her bed for hours pushing medications. That day will haunt me until my own death.
But my hubby’s family member did not go peacefully as most of my patients always had in hospice and over and over she said, ‘it’s so awful! it’s so awful!’ about the things she must’ve been seeing behind her eyelids. It was not a peaceful death. It was just weeks after my atheist patient’s death…. He was an incredibly intelligent man . . . But through his death he was racked with pain and anger and frustration and fear. He hadn’t had enough money for a burial and had donated his body to science….
I’ve never felt any spiritual presence in the room of my dying patients but I have had many of them tell me someone was there or noticed a difference in their dying experience. I don’t know if their dying experience is related to their own spiritual experience.”

CelticGoddess, BSN, RN, Jan. 8, 2016:

“I work on an Onc/Palliative unit, and all the nurses who work nights with me have a story. One night, one of my co-workers was standing down the hall (She was about at room 6) She says she saw a shadow out of the corner of her eye down by room 1. She would look over and it would be gone but a few minutes later she saw it again.
I have a patient who was dying of CA. She had been with us for quite some time, getting treatment for the CA. Finally she and her family made the decision that palliative would be better. One morning, as I was leaving work, I peaked in to her room to see how she was doing. I saw a shadow in the corner of her room. Oddly, her room felt very peaceful. She died that evening….
My grandma and my great Aunt both saw their deceased sister and mum when they were close to dying.”

Jbryson79, Aug. 26, 2016:

“I work in a pediatric ER and between the hours of 0400 and 0700 it’s pretty quiet in there. So there are two rooms where you always feel like someone is in the rooms. You may hear the tv go on and off, drawers open and shut and lights going on and off. It’s a little creepy.”

“Peace I leave with you; my peace I give you. I do not give to you as the world gives. Do not let your hearts be troubled and do not be afraid.” –John 14:27

~Eowyn

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D.C. satanists: Sally Quinn of Washington Post used hexes to kill people

For some time now, the Alternative Media have been saying Washington, D.C., is a nest of satanists.
Given the fact that D.C. is where the politically powerful congregate, it stands to reason that the city would be a special target of satanists. What better way than to corrupt and bring down the United States, still the most powerful country in the world?
Last year, we learnt that John Podesta, a longtime Clinton associate who chaired Hillary Clinton’s 2016 presidential campaign, partook of a satanic ritual called spirit cooking dinner — a “sacrament” in Thelema founded by British satanist Aleister Crowley whose motto was “Do As Thou Wilt,” in which menstrual blood, breast milk, urine and sperm are ingested. (See “Evidence that Hillary Clinton and her associates are satanists“)
Yesterday, we learnt that Hillary Clinton who, were it not for the grace of God, would be the U.S. president now, admitted she had wanted to make and stick pins into voodoo dolls of her critics.
Today, you’ll find out about a very powerful D.C. woman who put hexes on her enemies.
A curse is an expressed wish that some form of adversity or misfortune will befall another (or a place or object). A hex is more than a curse: To hex someone is to call upon a supernatural power, by means of “magic” or witchcraft, to bring ill on another. According to Wikipedia, the word “hexing” comes from the German word for witchcraft.
Sally Quinn, now 76, is a former reporter and current religion blogger for Washington Post (WP) who became the third (and last) wife of the late WP executive editor and later, vice president, Benjamin Bradlee. Bradlee became a celebrated and national figure during the presidency of Richard Nixon when he challenged the federal government over the right to publish the Pentagon Papers and oversaw the publication of Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein’s stories documenting the Watergate scandal.
Together, from their marriage in 1978 until Bradlee’s death in 2014, the couple were among D.C.’s most powerful, reigning over the city’s social scene as its gatekeepers.
In 2006, Quinn wrote that her parents were religious “but didn’t go to church,” and that she was an atheist since the time she was a small child because she could not believe in a God who allowed evil and bad things to happen to people, including her (unnamed) sickness when she was ten years old.

John Nolte reports for Breitbart, Sept 12, 2017:

“For nearly 50 years, the entire social and political world of DC revolved around this couple. Bradlee and Quinn were the New Camelot (his career took off in large part because of his friendship with John F. Kennedy), the Gatekeepers of who was in and who was out, the Elite Deciders among our Ruling Class with the extraordinary power of the Washington Post, and by extension the rest of the mainstream media, to abuse and weaponize their will against the rest of us.
Well, to put it as bluntly as possible, we are now learning that the Queen of Camelot is an occultist, a witch of sorts who honestly believes (according to her own new memoir) that she murdered three innocent people through the dark art of the hex: a young woman who committed suicide after flirting with Quinn’s boyfriend; a magazine editor who published an unflattering profile of her, who decades later died of cancer; a psychic who died of a cerebral hemorrhage before the end of the year after telling Quinn something she did not want to hear. […]
Quinn’s other acts of admitted wickedness include plotting to break up Bradlee’s marriage (which she did) and using the threat of adultery to bend Bradlee to her will.”

Quinn “practiced the occult in the most demonic ways imaginable well into adulthood.” She finally stopped hexing others, not out of a sense of remorse, but because she thought she was karmically responsible for the unusual illness of her and Bradlee’s only son, Quinn.
Quinn Bradlee was born in 1982 (when Sally Quinn was 41 and Ben Bradlee was 61) with a rare and incurable disease called velo-cardio-facial syndrome, aka DiGeorge syndrome, 22q11.2 deletion or Shprintzen syndrome. Caused by the deletion of a small segment (30-40 genes) of chromosome 22, the syndrome occurs in only 1 in 4,000 people with afflictions that can include congenital heart problems, specific facial features, frequent infections, developmental delay, learning problems, cleft palate, kidney problems, hearing loss, and autoimmune disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis and Graves disease.
Nolte points out that what is almost as troubling as Sally Quinn’s witchcraft is “the matter-of-fact way in which the Washington Post informs us of this bombshell” under the chatty headline, ‘‘Sally Quinn’s hexes, marital ultimatums and visceral love of her son”. Nolte writes:

“We have just discovered that one of the primary movers and shakers of the last half-century is a practicing occultist, and…
Nothing.
Nobody cares.
The information is dropped as though Quinn’s tell-all is the usual-usual about plastic surgeries and sex.
Worse still, our Ruling Class is now joking about Quinn putting a deadly hex on President Trump. […]
Let’s just say it out loud… The most powerful people in our country are either outright occultists, are comfortable with witchcraft and Satanism, or are moving and shaking among those who are.
Whether or not you believe in the power of the occult, that does not matter. Also beside the point is whether or not the Podestas and Quinn and those calling to have Trump hexed believe.
What we do know is that these people have completely rejected any notion of a loving God, and moved towards darkness.
Furthermore, we also know that this darkness is not about consenting adults behaving badly amongst themselves. Rather, this is about them attempting to harness a power to control others, to manipulate events to their will, to hurt or outright kill those who offend or insult them.

What is remarkable is that, although he was born with a hole in his heart and underwent heart surgery when he was three months old, after which he spent many years in and out of hospital and attended special schools for severe learning problems, and although he never received a religious education, Quinn Bradlee is a believing but non-church going Christian.

In 2006 when Quinn was 24 years old, he told his mother that he believes in God. He said:

“My image of God is what Michaelangelo painted on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel. God is a man stronger and more powerful than everybody else. I also believe that if you think about God, if you say his name all the time, then you will believe in him. It will be in your subconscious. . . .
I knew you and Dad were not very religious people . . . . I didn’t really understand that you didn’t believe in God until a few years ago. I didn’t know what ‘atheist’ meant. It’s a very harsh word, very ugly word. It’s like calling a black person the “N” word. . . .
Everything happens for a reason. Maybe it’s God’s plan for me to go through this because I can handle it. . . .
In a way, believing in God is like having a girlfriend that you love and care about. You feel safe with her. You feel safe with God, the way you would with your girlfriend. When you get married she will be with you in sickness and in health. That’s what I believe God will do when I’m going through the hard times of life.”

Now 35 years old, Josiah Quinn Bradlee is a filmmaker, author and advocate for the disabled.
See also:

~Eowyn

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