Category Archives: Mitt Romney

5 reasons why Democrat docu-maker Michael Moore thinks Trump will win

While the Left’s willing accomplices in the media pour on their sickening adulation of Hillary in their selective reporting of the Democratic National Convention, one Democrat is actually speaking the truth.

In a very long, tediously verbose email to his followers whom he addresses as “friends,” which you can read for yourself here, Hollyweirdo film maker Michael Moore mournfully predicts that Donald Trump will defeat Hillary Clinton this November.

By the way, did Moore take in even one Muslim refugee?

By the way, did Moore take in even one Muslim refugee?

Moore writes:

I am sorry to be the bearer of bad news, but I gave it to you straight last summer when I told you that Donald Trump would be the Republican nominee for president. And now I have even more awful, depressing news for you: Donald J. Trump is going to win in November. This wretched, ignorant, dangerous part-time clown and full time sociopath is going to be our next president. President Trump. Go ahead and say the words, ‘cause you’ll be saying them for the next four years: “PRESIDENT TRUMP.”

Notwithstanding his forlorn wish that he could “be proven wrong,” and despite his belief that “the American people clearly want” the Obama legacy to be continued, which the “whip-smart” Hillary Clinton who “cares about kids” will, Moore tells his followers that they must “stop living in denial and face the truth which you know deep down is very, very real.”

According to Michael Moore, these are the 5 reasons Trump is going to win:

1. Trump will win the rustbelt states of Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin

These are four traditionally “blue” states in the rustbelt of the upper Great Lakes which can no longer be relied on to vote Democrat because “the Clintons’ support of NAFTA helped to destroy the industrial states of the Upper Midwest, and Trump will “hammer” Hillary on this “and her support of TPP and other trade policies that have royally screwed the people of these four states.” Moore predicts that “What happened in the UK with Brexit is going to happen here” because of the plight and anger of the former industrial workers of America’s rustbelt:

“From Green Bay to Pittsburgh, this, my friends, is the middle of England – broken, depressed, struggling, the smokestacks strewn across the countryside with the carcass of what we use to call the Middle Class. Angry, embittered working (and nonworking) people who were lied to by the trickle-down of Reagan and abandoned by Democrats who still try to talk a good line but are really just looking forward to rub one out with a lobbyist from Goldman Sachs who’ll write them nice big check before leaving the room.”

Trump understands and speaks to their anger. Moore writes:

“When Trump stood in the shadow of a Ford Motor factory during the Michigan primary, he threatened the corporation that if they did indeed go ahead with their planned closure of that factory and move it to Mexico, he would slap a 35% tariff on any Mexican-built cars shipped back to the United States. It was sweet, sweet music to the ears of the working class of Michigan, and when he tossed in his threat to Apple that he would force them to stop making their iPhones in China and build them here in America, well, hearts swooned and Trump walked away with a big victory that should have gone to the governor next-door, John Kasich.”

Some signs that Trump will win those 4 rustbelt states are:

  • All four states have elected Republican governors since 2010 (only Pennsylvania recently elected a Democrat).
  • In the Michigan primary in March, more Michiganders came out to vote for the Republicans (1.32 million) that the Democrats (1.19 million).
  • Trump is ahead of Hillary in the latest polls in Pennsylvania and tied with her in Ohio.
  • In 2012, Mitt Romney lost by 64 electoral votes. The electoral votes cast by Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin are precisely 64, which means “All Trump needs to do to win is to carry, as he’s expected to do, the swath of traditional red states from Idaho to Georgia (states that’ll never vote for Hillary Clinton), and then he just needs these four rust belt states. He doesn’t need Florida. He doesn’t need Colorado or Virginia. Just Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin. And that will put him over the top. This is how it will happen in November.”

2. The Angry White Man

While he has only contempt for America’s angry white men who he says are furious that the “male-dominated, 240-year run of the USA is coming to an end” and “a woman is about to take over,” Moore nevertheless sees the 2016 presidential election as the “last stand” of the “Endangered White Male” who will turn out in droves to vote for Trump.

3. Hillary Clinton

Asking his followers, “Can we speak honestly, just among ourselves?,” Moore says outright that “Our biggest problem here isn’t Trump – it’s Hillary.” Here are the dimensions of what Moore calls “The Hillary Problem”:

  • Hillary Clinton is a hawk, who “will find a way to get us in some kind of military action.”
  • Hillary Clinton is hugely unpopular — nearly 70% of all voters think she is untrustworthy and dishonest.
  • Hillary Clinton is an opportunist — she doesn’t really believe “in anything other than what can get you elected. That’s why she fights against gays getting married one moment, and the next she’s officiating a gay marriage.”
  • Young women, in particular, don’t like Hillary and “are among her biggest detractors…. [N]ot a day goes by that a millennial doesn’t tell me they aren’t voting for her.
  • No enthusiasm of Hillary means low voter turnout: “No Democrat, and certainly no independent, is waking up on November 8th excited to run out and vote for Hillary the way they did the day Obama became president or when Bernie was on the primary ballot. The enthusiasm just isn’t there. And because this election is going to come down to just one thing — who drags the most people out of the house and gets them to the polls — Trump right now is in the catbird seat.”

4. The Depressed Sanders Vote

While Moore maintains that Bernie Sanders’ supporters will vote for Hillary, he warns that “The fire alarm that should be going off is that while the average Bernie backer will drag him/herself to the polls that day to somewhat reluctantly vote for Hillary, it will be what’s called a ‘depressed vote’ – meaning the voter doesn’t bring five people to vote with her. He doesn’t volunteer 10 hours in the month leading up to the election.” That’s because Bernie supporters, being young, “have zero tolerance for phonies and BS.” And although “They’re not going to vote for Trump; some will vote third party, but many will just stay home.” And Hillary picking Tim Kaine — “a moderate, bland-o, middle of the road old white guy” — as her running mate sent precisely the wrong message to the Bernie millennials.

5. the angry, DEFIANT american

Moore calls his 5th reason why Trump will win “the Jesse Ventura Effect”. By that he means what happened “back in the ‘90s when the people of Minnesota elected a professional wrestler as their governor” simply because they could — a gesture of defiance against the establishment, “Minnesotans’ version of a good practical joke on a sick political system.”

Moore predicts “This is going to happen again with Trump” when the voter draws “the curtain and are all alone in the voting booth” — “one of the few places left in society where there are no security cameras, no listening devices, no spouses, no kids, no boss, no cops … and no one can make you do anything.” And because of “the anger that so many have toward a broken political system, millions are going to vote for Trump not because they agree with him, not because they like his bigotry or ego, but just because they can. Just because it will upset the apple cart and make mommy and daddy mad.”

In other words, like so many other political analysts, Moore correctly sees the American people as sick of the prevailing system, and they want to “shake things up,” which “President Trump would indeed do just that, and a good chunk of the electorate would like to sit in the bleachers and watch that reality show.”

H/t FOTM reader MCA.

~Eowyn

Rove-Romney-Kasich plot against Trump in Cleveland?

The 2016 Republican National Convention that began today in Cleveland, Ohio, promises to be that rare GOP Convention that’s boycotted by the party’s super luminaries.

polls_GOP_Suicide_4337_123568_poll_xlargeNeither of the former President Bushes will attend, nor will former Republican presidential nominees John McCain and Mitt Romney, nor will Ohio Governor John Kasich, who had fought for Cleveland to host the convention.

Curiously, however, both Romney and Kasich will be in Cleveland at the time, though not at the convention. So is GOP guru Karl Rove.

In fact, Rove and InfoWars’ Alex Jones were on the same connecting American Airlines flight to Cleveland, and had a fracas upon landing at Cleveland’s Hopkins International Airport.

Jones approached Rove, calling him by the nickname given Rove by George W. Bush, “turd blosson.” Rove threatened to call the police on Jones.

Jones believes Rove is in Cleveland “to siphon off” super-delegates from voting for Trump.

Independent investigative journalist Wayne Madsen writes:

The presence of Rove, along with failed 2012 GOP presidential candidate Mitt Romney, in Cleveland can only mean that there is some serious closed-door political maneuvering against GOP nominee Donald Trump.

But Madsen, in a previous article, maintains that:

The campaign to drop Trump from the ticket will be unsuccessful due to Trump’s support on the GOP Rules Committee. The schism, however, will prevent any party unity going into November. The lack of party unity cost Humphrey the election in 1968 and Ford re-election in 1976. But keep in mind that those were the days when politics, barring an assassination, were predictable. That is not the case this year.

~Eowyn

WTF: If elected president, Trump won’t serve?

In a recent interview, when Donald Trump was asked by the New York Times if he would actually serve should he beat Hillary and is elected President, Trump refused to give a definitive answer.

The New York Times did not actually give us the transcript of the interview. Below is Jason Horowitz’ article, “Would Donald Trump Quit if He Wins the election? He Doesn’t Rule it Out,” in The New York Times of July 8, 2016, in its entirety:

The traditional goal of a presidential nominee is to win the presidency and then serve as president.

Donald J. Trump is not a traditional candidate for president.

Presented in a recent interview with a scenario, floating around the political ether, in which the presumptive Republican nominee proves all the naysayers wrong, beats Hillary Clinton and wins the presidency, only to forgo the office as the ultimate walk-off winner, Mr. Trump flashed a mischievous smile.

“I’ll let you know how I feel about it after it happens,” he said minutes before leaving his Trump Tower office to fly to a campaign rally in New Hampshire.

It is, of course, entirely possible that Mr. Trump is playing coy to earn more news coverage. But the notion of the intensely competitive Mr. Trump’s being more interested in winning the presidency than serving as president is not exactly a foreign concept to close observers of this presidential race.

Early in the contest, his rivals, Republican operatives and many reporters questioned the seriousness of his candidacy. His knack for creating controversy out of thin air (this week’s edition: the Star of David Twitter post) and his inclination toward self-destructive comments did not instill confidence in a political culture that values on-message discipline in its candidates.

Those doubts dissipated after Mr. Trump vanquished his Republican opponents and locked up the nomination.

“I’ve actually done very well,” Mr. Trump said. “We beat 18 people, right?”

But as the race has turned toward the general election and a majority of polls have shown Mr. Trump trailing Mrs. Clinton, speculation has again crept into political conversations in Washington, New York and elsewhere that Mr. Trump will seek an exit strategy before the election to avoid a humiliating loss.

Told of Mr. Trump’s noncommittal comment, Stuart Stevens, a senior adviser to Mitt Romney in 2012 who has become one of Mr. Trump’s most vocal critics, said that Mr. Trump was “a con man who is shocked his con hasn’t been called” and that he was looking for an emergency exit.

“He has no sense of how to govern,” Mr. Stevens said. “He can’t even put together a campaign.” [Really, Stuart Stevens? Trump managed to “put together a campaign” that defeated all his GOP rivals in primary elections. I call that a successful campaign! What would you call it? -Dr. Eowyn]

Even Mr. Trump’s supporters acknowledge that his past campaigns had the air of a vanity tour. That impression lingers. A recent Trump news release promising “a speech regarding the election” prompted many reporters and political fortunetellers to predict a declaration of his departure. But just the fact that a routine news release prompted paroxysms of conjecture throughout the political universe suggested that, as Mr. Trump might say, “there’s something going on.”

Mr. Trump’s campaign and his supporters dismiss the talk as the fantasizing of frightened liberals or frustrated establishment figures.

“He’s not going to pull out,” said Thomas Barrack Jr., a financier and real estate investor who is a close friend of Mr. Trump’s. He compared Mr. Trump’s candidacy to an innovative start-up company: “You never see disruption when it’s happening.”

In Mr. Trump’s case, the disruption is everywhere. Last fall, he said in television interviews that if his standing collapsed in the Republican primary polls, he could very well return to his business. In mid-June, amid an onslaught of negative news coverage, he joked to a crowd that he would consider leaving the race for $5 billion.
On the off chance he actually is planning to back out, what would happen?

Alexander Keyssar, a historian at Harvard who is working on a book about the Electoral College, said the process of succession would depend on “the precise moment at which he said, ‘Nah, never mind.’”

The party representatives who make up the Electoral College would suddenly have real power rather than a rubber stamp. If Mr. Trump bowed out after winning on Nov. 8 but before the electors met in each state to cast their ballots on Dec. 19, then the electors could have the opportunity to vote for another candidate, Professor Keyssar said.

A majority of the 538 electors would be Republicans, but they might not agree on the best alternative candidate. If no one won a majority of the electors, the contest between the top three vote-getters — one of whom would presumably be Mrs. Clinton — would go to the House of Representatives, where each state would be given one vote, while the Senate would select the vice president. House Republicans hold 33 states to the Democrats’ 14, with three evenly split. It is unclear whether the vote would take place before or after newly elected representatives were seated.

It is also unclear what would happen, Professor Keyssar said, if Mr. Trump bid adieu after the electoral votes were cast but before they were officially counted, per the 12th Amendment, by the president of the Senate before a joint session of Congress in January. And if Mr. Trump left after the votes were counted in Congress but before he was sworn in on Jan. 20, Professor Keyssar said the closest guidance would probably come from Section Three of the 20th Amendment: “If, at the time fixed for the beginning of the term of the president, the president-elect shall have died, the vice president-elect shall become president.”

“Nothing like this has ever happened,” Professor Keyssar said.

And nothing like it will this year, Mr. Trump’s supporters say.

“It’s going to be too late by then,” Roger Stone, Mr. Trump’s longtime political adviser, said of the go-out-on-top theory. “If he got elected president, he’d certainly serve. I’m fairly certain about that. You think he’d resign? I don’t see that happening. There is only one star in the Donald Trump show, and that’s Donald Trump.”

Russell Verney, a former top strategist for Ross Perot, the Texas billionaire who abruptly pulled out of the 1992 election, only to re-enter and win 19 percent of the vote, said that outsider candidates were more vulnerable to questions about their resolve.

“It never would be a subject raised with Romney and others, because the presidency is the ultimate goal of their entire professional career,” said Mr. Verney, who conferred with Mr. Trump during his exploration of a presidential run in 2000, during which, he said, Mr. Trump expressed reservations about selling his casinos to fund his campaign. “Donald Trump has not worked toward being president every day of his professional career.”

Mr. Trump’s supporters point out that he has begun adopting the more traditional trappings of a presidential campaign: a fund-raising operation, policy ideas, prepared speeches.

“This is silly,” said Sean Spicer, a spokesman for the Republican National Committee, which has tried hard to make the Trump campaign more professional. “He’s in it to win it.”

But the only person who could truly put any doubts to rest seemed instead to relish the idea of keeping everyone guessing, concluding the recent conversation with a you’re-on-to-something grin and handshake across his cluttered desk.

“We’ll do plenty of stories,” Mr. Trump promised enigmatically. “O.K.?”

So what do you think?

Sound off in our poll below:

~Eowyn

Bill Kristol declares there will be a 3rd-party candidate against Trump

polls_GOP_Suicide_4337_123568_poll_xlargeIn the early days of Donald Trump’s presidential campaign, fearing that he might go independent if he did not get the GOP’s nomination, the Republican Establishment begged him not to because it would ensure a Hillary Clinton win.

Trump agreed.

Now that Trump has, fairly and squarely, won enough delegates in GOP primaries to be the party’s presidential nominee, GOP elites are doing exactly what they had asked Trump not to.

On Sunday, May 29, 2016, Bill Kristol, the so-called “neoconservative” (which really comes down to mean pro-war) editor of The Weekly Standard and son of Jewish parents “godfather of neoconservatism” Irving Kristol and Gertrude Himmelfarb, announced on Twitter: “There will be an independent candidate–an impressive one, with a strong team and a real chance.”

Bill Kristol tweetBreitbart reports that Bill Kristol has been trying for months to find a third-party challenger since his preferred candidates lost in the Republican primaries to Trump.

Kristol has floated names including Mitt Romney, Tom Cotton, and Marco Rubio as potential third-party spoilers. Kristol tried to get retired Marine Corps general James Mattis to run, but Mattis turned him down.

Kristol recently met with Romney in Washington, D.C., to talk about the idea.  Romney has consistently bashed Trump throughout this election cycle, even after Trump became the presumptive Republican nominee. In January this year, Romney and Paul Ryan filed an intention to run for the presidency with the Federal Election Commision.

The Republican National Committee has condemned Kristol’s third-party scheme as “helping to elect Hillary Clinton.”

david frenchMark Halperin and John Heilemann report for Bloomberg, March 30, 2016, that the person Kristol has in mind is David French, a staff writer at Weekly Standard, whose name Kristol floated in the magazine’s current issue.

French is a veteran of Operation Iraqi Freedom, a recipient of the Bronze Star, a constitutional lawyer, and author of several books. He lives in Columbia, Tenn., with his wife Nancy and three children.

Reached in Israel late yesterday afternoon, Kristol declined to comment but confirmed that French is open to launching a bid. French has not made a final decision and reportedly has not lined up a vice-presidential running mate or significant financial support. However, according to one person deeply involved in the efforts to recruit a 3rd party challenger, some conservative donors look favorably on the prospect of French entering the fray.

See also:

~Eowyn

Paul Ryan blinks: Will endorse Trump & step down as RNC chair

The first thing Paul Ryan, who was Mitt Romney’s VP runningmate in 2012, did after becoming Speaker of the House last December was to cave in to everything that Obama wants. See “Betrayal: GOP funds Planned Parenthood, Syrian ‘refugees’ and amnesty for illegals“.

After Donald Trump won last week’s Indiana GOP primaries and became the party’s presumptive nominee, Ryan said he would not endorse Trump.

Trump fired back, saying he would be “very quick” to remove Ryan as chairman of the upcoming Republican National Convention, for how can the chair of the convention oppose the individual whom the convention would nominate?

But it appears in the Trump-Ryan contest, the latter has blinked.

Paul-Ryan-SCGabby Morrongielo reports for the Washington Examiner, May 9, 2016:

House Speaker Paul Ryan would reportedly be willing to resign as chairman of the upcoming Republican National Convention should Donald Trump, the party’s presumptive presidential nominee, ask him to do so.

During a meeting Monday with Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reporters in his hometown of Janesville, Wis., Ryan reportedly said he would do “whatever” Trump wants when it comes to convention planning since he is the de facto nominee.

“He’s the nominee. I’ll do whatever he wants with respect to the convention,” Ryan told the paper. […]

Ryan also rejected former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin’s recent claim that his refusal to endorse Trump is linked to future presidential ambitions.

“I would not have become Speaker of the House if I had 2020 aspirations,” he told the Journal-Sentinel. “I could have run in 2012 and 2016. The Speaker is not exactly a good stepping stone for president.”

“I think people who know me know that is not my aspiration,” he added.

[Really? Hey, Ryan, how do you explain the fact that this January 31, you and Romney filed Form 1 with the Federal Election Commission, indicating your intention to run for the presidency? See “It’s deja vu all over again: Romney-Ryan filed intention to run for presidency with FEC“]

According to Schneider, Ryan also said he completely opposes efforts by party elders to put forth a conservative, third-party alternative to Trump. His comments come just minutes after Weekly Standard editor Bill Kristol told CNN there’s a “50-50” chance he and his cohorts will convince someone to launch an independent bid.

A spokesperson for Ryan could not be reached for comment.

The Washington Post reported that Kristol is courting Romney and that on May 6, 2016, the two met privately to discuss the possibility of launching an independent bid, potentially with Romney as its standard-bearer.

~Eowyn

GOP’s War on Trump: Colorado gives all delegates to Ted Cruz without voting

polls_GOP_Suicide_4337_123568_poll_xlarge

Joe Kovacs reports for WND, April 10, 2016, that last weekend, Ted Cruz swept all of Colorado’s 34 delegates without any votes being cast by citizens in a traditional primary process.

The Colorado GOP made its intent very clear in a tweet:

Colorado GOP tweet

Appearing on “Fox & Friends” this morning, Donald Trump said:

“I’ve gotten millions … of more votes than [Sen. Ted] Cruz, and I’ve gotten hundreds of delegates more, and we keep fighting, fighting, fighting, and then you have a Colorado where they just get all of these delegates, and it’s not [even] a system. There was no voting. I didn’t go out there to make a speech or anything. There’s no voting. They offer them [the delegates] trips — they offer them all sorts of things, and you’re allowed to do that. I mean, you’re allowed to offer trips, and you can buy all these votes. What kind of a system is this? Now, I’m an outsider, and I came into the system and I’m winning the votes by millions of votes. But the system is rigged. It’s crooked.

It was last August when officials with the Republican Party in Colorado decided they would not let voters take part in the early nomination process. The Denver Post reported on August 25, 2015, that “The GOP executive committee has voted to cancel the traditional presidential preference poll after the national party changed its rules to require a state’s delegates to support the candidate that wins the caucus vote.” Ryan Call, a former state GOP chairman, told the paper, “It takes Colorado completely off the map” in the primary season.

In late February this year, just before Super Tuesday, the Post published a scathing editorial, saying “GOP leaders have never provided a satisfactory reason for forgoing a presidential preference poll, although party chairman Steve House suggested on radio at one point that too many Republicans would otherwise flock to their local caucus. Imagine that: party officials fearing that an interesting race might propel thousands of additional citizens to participate. But of course that might dilute the influence of elites and insiders. You can see why that could upset the faint-hearted.”

A Trump supporter named Larry Wayne Lindsey took to YouTube yesterday to express his displeasure with the process and burned his Republican registration on camera. He said, as he torched his party registration, “Republican Party, take note. I think you’re gonna see a whole lot more of these. I’ve been a Republican all my life, but I will never be a Republican again. You’ve had it. You’re done. You’re toast. Because I quit the party. I’m voting for Trump, and to hell with the Republican Party.”

Meanwhile, House Speaker and former Republican VP nominee Paul Ryan is positioning himself to be the party’s nominee at a brokered Republican convention in Ohio this July.

Jennifer Steinhauer reports for The New York Times, April 10, 2016, that Ryan’s behaviors that are fueling rumors of a coup at the Republican convention which would elevate him to the top of the ticket, include:

  • Foreign trips, such as visiting Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu in Israel, where he also met with local reporters and made several statements affirming the United States’ commitment there; and visits to other Middle Eastern countries and Germany to discuss security and intelligence issues.
  • Ryan’s staff in Washington churning flattering videos of him deploring identity politics and promoting a battle of ideas — set to campaign-style music.
  • Without calling it a presidential campaign, Ryan launched a national campaign called “Confident America“.

Peter Wehner, a former director of the White House Office of Strategic Initiatives under President George W. Bush who has known Ryan for two decades, said, “There is no question that Ryan is operating in a very ambitious way. He is trying to set forth a path for the party with ideas and policy proposals and principles. That is unusual for a speaker in an election year.”

Paul Ryan became House Speaker late last year.

What the New York Times left out (and seemingly does not know) is that in January, Paul Ryan and Mitt Romney had filed their intention to run for the presidency with the Federal Election Commission.

Lastly, in another sign that the GOP is dead set against Trump, investigative journalist Wayne Madsen reports today that GOP strategist Karl Rove, who had backed the aborted campaign of former Florida governor Jeb Bush, is doing his utmost to deny the GOP nomination to Donald Trump by providing campaign advice for Republican Ted Cruz and Democrat Hillary Clinton. Madsen writes:

By backing Cruz, Rove hopes to generate a brokered Republican convention in Cleveland, one that will turn to a “fresh face” to challenge Mrs. Clinton in the general election. As an insurance policy against a Trump presidency, Rove, according to our sources, is also providing advice to the Clinton campaign via the auspices of Clinton loyalist and Democratic strategist James Carville, who has become a friend of Rove. Carville is married to GOP strategist and pundit Mary Matalin.

H/t FOTM‘s Glenn47 & maziel

See also:

~Eowyn

David Stockman: Wall St.-Washington establishment petrified by Donald Trump

petrify

David Stockman, 69, is the former Director of the Office of Management and Budget (1981-85) in the Reagan Administration.

In his article of April 4, 2016, “Trump Unbound,” Stockman explains why Trump petrifies the money-political establishment. In short, it’s because he speaks the truth about the U.S. economy.

Even by The Donald’s standards his 95 minute long interview with the Washington Post was remarkable. He let loose so many stray shots as to leave the establishment press clucking in a chorus of disbelief. It undoubtedly started with the stink bomb he lobbied at the ” all is awesome” meme about the US economy and stock market:

Donald Trump said in an interview that economic conditions are so perilous that the country is headed for a “very massive recession and that “it’s a terrible time right now” to invest in the stock market, embracing a distinctly gloomy view of the economy that counters mainstream economic forecasts.

The New York billionaire dismissed concern that his comments — which are exceedingly unusual, if not unprecedented, for a major party front-runner — could potentially affect financial markets.

Now there’s an irony. Presumably the last paragraph was written by Bob Woodward who was once the bête noir of the Washington/Wall Street establishment. But like nearly everyone else in the Imperial City he has been drinking the Cool-Aid for so many decades that he was shocked by Trump’s unfiltered bit of truth-telling about an economy that is failing 90% of the American public.

Worse still, Woodward was apparently dumbfounded that Trump didn’t self-censor his thoughts about the economic troubles ahead for fear of unsettling the Wall Street casino.

That’s right. The cult of the stock market and the notion that the Fed literally controls and powers the US economy through the transmission belt of Wall Street and soaring financial asset prices has gotten so deeply embedded in the establishment narrative that even the pedigreed left-wing of the journalistic establishment has been coopted into reflexively chanting the meme.

So imagine Woodward’s consternation when Trump——-the very embodiment of a billionaire financial tycoon—–let loose with the following counterpunch:

“I know the Wall Street people probably better than anybody knows them,” said Trump, who has misfired on such predictions in the past. “I don’t need them.”

Those last five words are what has the Washington GOP establishment in a cold sweat. The fact is, the Washington based apparatus of the GOP is beholden lock, stock and barrel to Wall Street and the broader financial services industry for sustenance. That is, PAC funds and the K-street influence peddling rackets which make life in the Imperial City so copasetic for careerist politicians and their apparatchiks.

Indeed, there is an obvious quid pro quo. The job of the Washington GOP leadership amounts to keeping the free market yokels who frequently get sent to Washington from the conservative provinces busy on everything except the core problem. That is, they are kept distracted whopping it up about neocon war missions abroad, vastly exaggerated terrorist threats at home, the supposed affliction of illegal immigrants who actually do much of America’s low-skill work and the pro-statist agenda of the right-to-lifers, anti-gays and sundry similarly projects of the red state bible-thumpers.

Meanwhile, capitalist prosperity is in existential crisis. The central bank’s free money is destroying honest price discovery in the financial markets, deforming the free market allocation of investment and other economic resources, crushing savers, retirees and real entrepreneurs and generating unspeakable windfalls to traders and speculators.

Indeed, if you are partial to tin foil hats you might even believe that the GOP leaderships’ kid gloves approach to the Fed had in mind the generation of a Bernie Sanders all along. Bernie has arisen because the sum and substance of Fed policy is massive inflation of financial asset values, and therefore a reverse robin hood redistribution of wealth to the 1%.

So what could be more convenient to mobilize the red state base and the blue state left-behinds than a socialist candidacy on the Democratic ticket? Or failing that, a desperate Hillary Clinton who sounds like one?

And do not doubt that the GOP establishment is in league with the Eccles Building and its Wall Street suzerains. Do you remember who was chief economic advisor to Mitt Romney?

None other than a Columbia business professor and Wall Street shill by the name of Glenn Hubbard. During the heat of the campaign he kept the candidate radio silent on the fundamental issue of our times—–the Fed’s usurpation of vast powers of monetary central planning—–and even averred that Bernanke had been doing a fine job. Said professor Hubbard, he should be considered for reappointment!

And don’t even mention the clueless action of Senator McCain in 2008. The man actually suspended his campaign so that he could come back to Washington and help Bush and Paulson bail-out Wall Street; and to authorize the Fed to unleash a torrential spree of money printing that has virtually transformed Wall Street into a dangerous and unstable gambling casino.

Woodward’s snarky observation that Trump has “misfired on such predictions in the past” was especially ripe, but absolutely consistent with the establishment meme that all is fixed and getting better by the day.

Actually, when did the Fed and its gaggle of Wall Street camp-followers ever predict a recession and subsequent financial market crash? There was not a peep from those precincts in 2000 or 2007. It was all about tommyrot like the goldilocks economy, the Great Moderation and a supposedly minor subprime disturbance that was “well contained”.

Yes, most of what Trump has thrown into the debate is outlandish, regrettable, outright deplorable and just plain wrong. The Wall, the ban on Muslims, his call for more torture of enemies, his dog-whistling on race, his cop pandering, his know-nothing position against social security reform and his blatantly sexist name-calling fit some or all of the above categories.

And to the outlandish category, now add the blatantly stupid. To wit, Trump’s promise that he will eliminate the national debt in eight years!

Even there, however, he can perhaps be praised with faint damn. At least he recognizes that our current $19 trillion of national debt will be $22 trillion by the time the next President is in the saddle, and that its a short slide to national bankruptcy from there.

At the end of the day, Trump has petrified the Wall-Street Washington establishment for good reason. He loudly rejects the War Party consensus on foreign intervention. And he has tapped into a deep vein of main street alienation from the phony recovery and economic fixes promulgated by the Fed and its beltway henchman.

We had another jobs Friday celebration by the latter and it amounted to the same old, same old. That is, purportedly 100,000 new jobs in retail and bars and restaurants were added, but still no progress where it counts. There are nearly two million fewer full-time, full-pay jobs than there were when Bill Clinton was packing up his bags to leave the White House.

breadwinner economy

Even if the likes of Bob Woodward haven’t figured this out, the unschooled Donald Trump apparently has.  No wonder they fear Trump Unbound.

Click here for the full Washington Post interview.

See also:

~Eowyn