Category Archives: Afghan war

SAS sniper kills senior ISIS fighter with night-time shot from a mile away

SAS sniper

That’s some mighty, mighty fine shooting!

From Daily Mail: A British sniper has killed a senior ISIS fighter with a ‘one in a million’ night-time shot from nearly a mile away, it has been claimed.

The unnamed SAS marksman is said to have killed the terrorist with a ‘head shot’ close to the Syrian border having been given a window of just 15 seconds.

He is understood to be a sergeant with the SAS G-Squadron and a veteran of operations in both Iraq and Afghanistan, where he is said to have recorded as many as 100 kills.

According to the Daily Star Sunday, he is believed to have used a US-made McMillan TAC-50 sniper rifle as he targeted the fanatic from more than 1,500m away as he arrived at a safe house in a village.

The trooper is reportedly part of a counterterrorism drive in Iraq and Syria, which has been operating since the beginning of the year.

A source told the newspaper that the village in question was under ISIS control making a more preferable ‘capture mission’ impossible. The exact location has not been revealed.

‘The SAS team had hoped that the ISIS commander would arrive during the day because a night shot was regarded as too dangerous,’ the source said.

‘But as evening approached the team realised that they were going to have to either abort or go for a night shot. The sniper said he wanted to take the shot and was given a “go order”.

The sniper had 15 seconds to take his shot as the extremist pulled up in a car. The source said the extremist was killed instantly after being shot in the back of the head.

The Ministry of Defence declined to comment when contacted by MailOnline.



Guess who is speaking about “ethics in public service” at UCLA on Monday?

bradley manning

Manning: A convicted traitor and “ethics” expert…

Manning knows NOT ONE thing about ethics. This is a disgrace.

From the UCLA announcement:

“Join the UCLA Luskin School of Public Affairs for the next Luskin Lecture, featuring Chelsea Manning.

As an intelligence analyst for the U.S. Department of Defense, Chelsea Manning disclosed classified documents to WikiLeaks that revealed human rights abuses and corruption connected to the U.S. wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. She was convicted and sentenced to 35 years in a military prison, but released in 2017 after President Obama commuted her sentence. While in prison, Manning publicly identified as a trans woman and asserted her right to medical therapy.

Now an advocate for government transparency and queer and transgender rights, Manning will speak about ethics in public service; resistance in the age of artificial intelligence; activism and protest; transgender issues; and the intersection of technology and people’s lives.”

We live in bizarro world…

h/t Twitchy


2017: Chicago’s homicides outnumber US military casualties 18:1


The moniker “Chiraq” aptly earned.

As reported by Michael W. Chapman at There were 664 homicides in Chicago in 2017* and, for comparison, 37 casualties in the U.S. military in its myriad operations around the globe. That’s according to data from the Chicago Tribune and from the Department of Defense’s press office.

*HeyJackass! shows the final homicide tally at 675.

The Chicago deaths are for the period Jan. 1, 2017 through Dec. 31, 2017; the military deaths are from Jan. 1, 2017 through Dec. 22, 2017, which is the latest update on casualties by the DoD posted so far. (There may have been a few more military casualties in December.)

From the data available, it shows that Chicago suffered 17.9 times more homicides than the U.S. military worldwide — combat and non-combat related deaths — last year.

For Chicago, 664 homicides — murders by shooting or other means (not including suicides) — averages to 1.8 homicides every day of the year.

For the U.S. military, some of the deaths were combat related and some were non-combat related. For instance, the first death, on Jan. 7, 2017, was a non-combat related incident. Spc. Isiah L. Booker, of Cibolo, Texas, who was supporting Operation Inherent Resolve, died in the incident, which is under investigation.

On Jan. 29, 2017, Chief Special Warfare Operator William “Ryan” Owens, 36, of Peoria, Ill., died in “the Arabian Peninsula of Yemen, of wounds sustained in a raid against al-Qaida,” said the DoD.

On April 8, 2017, Staff Sgt. Mark R. De Alencar, 37, of Edgewood, Md., was killed in the Nangarghar Province of Afghanistan when “his unit came in contact with enemy forces using small arms fire during combat operations,” reported the DoD.

U.S. troops have been fighting in Afghanistan since October 2001, more than 16 years ago.  U.S. troops have been in Iraq since March 2003, more than 14 years ago.

The Chicago homicides are monitored and documented by the Chicago Tribune staff 24 hours a day, according to their website, “Crime in Chicagoland.”


Gold Star Army widow releases video of President Trump’s condolence phone call

Rep. Frederica Wilson (D-FL) set off a media frenzy this week, claiming she had overheard President Trump make a heartless comment to the widow of slain U.S. Army Sgt. La David Johnson, that the soldier “knew what he signed up for.”

White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders did not deny that the president made the comments when she was asked about them during an afternoon press briefing on Wednesday (Oct. 18), but said that his words were well-intentioned and “taken very far out of context.”

Yesterday (Oct. 19), an emotional White House Chief of Staff (retired Marine Corps) General John Kelly made an impromptu appearance at the White House press briefing. He described how the U.S. military treats, with great dignity, the bodies of  military members slain overseas, how the families of slain soldiers are informed, and that he was “stunned” and “broken hearted” by Congresswoman Wilson’s negative description of President Trump’s call to the widow of Sgt. Johnson.

General Kelly himself had lost a son, 29-year-old First Lieutenant Robert Kelly, in Afghanistan in 2010. He said that “typically,” it’s the company commander — as well as the Secretary of Defense and the President of the United States — who writes a letter of condolence to the family.

As for phone calls, while all presidents write letters, only “some presidents have elected to call,” and that “there’s no perfect way” to make that very difficult phone call.

Kelly said when President Trump asked him about making the phone call, his first recommendation was “not do it because it’s not the phone call that the family members are looking forward to.” Trump then asked Kelly what previous presidents had said to the families of slain soldiers. Kelly said:

“I said I could tell you that President Obama — who was my commander in chief when I was on active duty — did not call my family. That was not a criticism. That was just to simply say I don’t believe President Obama called. That’s not a negative thing. I don’t believe President Bush called in all cases. I don’t believe any president, particularly when the casualty rates are very, very high, that presidents call. I believe they all write.”

Kelly said that Trump decided to make phone calls to the families of four soldiers killed earlier this month, and asked what he should say. Kelly told Trump what his best friend and casualty officer Joe Dumphy had said when he delivered the news of Robert Kelly’s death:

He was doing exactly what he wanted to when he was killed. He knew what he was getting into by joining the Marines, that one percent. He knew what the possibilities were because we’re at war. And when he died . . . he was surrounded by the best men on this Earth — his friends.”

In other words, what President Trump said to the widow of Sgt. Johnson was precisely what the casualty officer had said to General Kelly about his slain son.

Today, Natasha De Alencar, a Gold Star widow of Staff Sgt. Mark De Alencar, a member of the 7th Special Forces group who was fatally shot in Afghanistan on April 8, 2017, released the transcript and video of the phone call she’d received from President Trump on April 12.

In the video of the 4-minute phone call obtained by CNN, President Trump is heard saying how sorry he was about the “whole situation”. Trump said about Sgt. De Alencar:

“He’s an unbelievable hero and you know all the people that served with him are saying how incredible he was. If you’re around Washington, you come over and see me in the Oval Office.”

Natasha De Alencar told the Washington Post of President Trump’s call:

“At that moment when my world was upside down and me and my kids didn’t know which way we were going, it felt like I was talking to just another regular human. It was a moment of niceness that we needed because we were going through hell.”

To Congresswoman Frederica Wilson:

Go fornicate yourself!


Higher education: Chelsea Manning named visiting “fellow” at Harvard

bradley manning

Harvard: Enabling a convicted traitor

I’m sure students will look forward to the lecture on turning a penis into a vagina!

From Yahoo: Chelsea Manning will be joining Harvard University as a visiting fellow at the John F. Kennedy School of Government, according to the school’s website.

Manning will speak on issues of LGBTQ identity in the military, Institute of Politics Fellows co-chairs Emily Hall and Jason Ge wrote in an announcement posted Wednesday.

“We welcome the breadth of thought-provoking viewpoints on race, gender, politics and the media,” Bill Delahunt, IOP acting director, said in the announcement.

Manning, a former Army intelligence analyst, was convicted in 2013 for leaking a huge cache of classified and sensitive documents. She was sentenced to 35 years in prison after a military judge found her guilty of six Espionage Act violations and multiple other charges relating to the dissemination of more than 700,000 classified military and State Department documents to WikiLeaks.

Manning was acquitted on the most serious charge of aiding the enemy.

After President Barack Obama commuted her sentence before leaving office, Manning has worked to re-brand herself as an activist for queer and transgender rights. She also speaks on topics related to artificial intelligence through op-ed columns for The New York Times and The Guardian, according to Harvard’s website.

Harvard’s IOP also announced three other visiting fellows: former White House press secretary Sean Spicer, CNN political commentator Robby Mook and Kansas City Mayor Sylvester “Sly” James Jr.


Marine veteran amputee reaches summit of Mount Kilimanjaro

kionte storey and jake rath

Jake Rath (l) and Marine Kionte Storey (r)/Photo courtesy of Jake Rath


From Fox News: Waking up around midnight on Aug. 25, Marine Cpl. Kionte Storey began his final trek up Mount Kilimanjaro, the culmination of months of rigorous training that led him to the top of Africa’s highest peak.

With every step he took, the 29-year-old veteran climbed higher than he ever had before. At 10:45 a.m. local time, Storey made it to the summit, 19,341 feet up – a feat made more outstanding by the fact he achieved it with a prosthetic leg.

The view, he said, was simply “amazing.”

“You look down and you are above the clouds,” he told Fox News on Tuesday. “I keep saying it was the closest thing to getting to heaven, and then the sun comes out and you can see everything.”

The trip to Africa was part of a campaign by the Bob Woodruff and Steven & Alexandra Cohen foundations called #Give2Veterans.

For the journey, Storey was joined by Jake Rath, 25, of the Steven & Alexandra Cohen Foundation, who documented the entire trip with a DSLR camera and 360-degree photo.

“The photos don’t do it justice,” he said, adding that seeing the night sky with only miles and miles of stars was breathtaking.

“To see the mountain in the starlight, thousands of stars, that was an amazing sight to see,” he added. “I was amazed by Africa.”

Storey, who joined the Marines in 2007, lost his right leg below the knee after stepping on an IED while deployed to Afghanistan in 2010. Part of his physical and mental recovery after the injury included training at Paralympic camps and hiking.

In 2013, he became the first African-American and first amputee to reach the summit of Antarctica’s Mount Vinson. “I didn’t know how my body was going to respond [in Africa],” Storey said. “My leg did well all the way up – it did a lot better than I expected.”

Both men said they had to pace themselves while on the climb, not trying to rush and give their bodies time to acclimate. Trekking through the different terrains – from jungle to savannas and finally glacier-covered stone peaks – made for a more interesting climb.

“We both trained a good amount – we were fit. The hardest was the mental challenge,” Rath said. “For each step you take, it’s the highest step you have taken.”

Through #Give2Veterans, the Steven & Alexandra Cohen Foundation is giving away up to $500,000 to help veterans. The foundation will give the Bob Woodruff Foundation $1 every time a social media post is shared using the hashtag. The campaign ends on Sept. 30.

The California native said the final push to the top of Kilimanjaro was the make-or-break moment for them because it was the point in the journey when they started questioning everything.

“You start asking yourself ‘why’ – ‘why am I doing this when I could be doing better things?,’” he said. “And then I started to think about the whys and I remembered my friends serving overseas who aren’t alive. I started thinking about amputees and showing them through my experience that anything is possible.

He added: “For us know that we were doing it for something bigger than ourselves, [we thought], ‘we are getting to the summit and that’s it.’ That’s how big our reason was for getting to the summit.”


GAG: Vogue promotes a traitor and transgender

bradley manning

Pro-tip for transgender men: hide your manly hands!

We certainly know Vogue’s stance on American traitors. Try not to lose your lunch reading through this absolute baloney about a convicted traitor.

From Yahoo: Chelsea Manning — the transgender Army private imprisoned in 2013 for leaking classified information, whose sentence was commuted by former President Barack Obama — has been making a splash, albeit a gradual one, since her release from a military prison in May. She began posting flirty Instagrams on her first day in the free world and has now made a quick ascent with her public profile, to the pages of Vogue.

“Guess this is what freedom looks like,” Manning wrote in her Thursday Instagram post, which features a photo of herself posing on an empty beach in a red one-piece Norma Kamali swimsuit.

The glamour shot, taken by none other than Annie Leibovitz, is from her profile in the September issue, in which the 29-year-old New York City resident attends a Lambda Literary Awards party, visits the home of legendary drag queen Flawless Sabrina, and talks about her awkward childhood and tense adolescence, as well as being an “adrenaline junkie” and a Marc Jacobs fan, coming to terms with her transgender identity, and surviving prison.

“There are people who have really put their lives on the line for something, and they come out on the other side of it. You can feel that with her,” Laura Poitras, executive producer of a documentary being made about Manning, said of her subject to Vogue. “Now that she’s free, what is she going to do with her freedom?” She added, “When I first met Ed Snowden in Hong Kong, he had the same sort of eerie power.”

Manning said she’s not quite sure how she’ll harness her power yet, and the Vogue story notes she had been interested in running for political office before transitioning. On whether it’s something she’s still thinking about, she noted, “I’m certainly not going to say no, and I’m certainly not going to say yes. My goal is to use these next six months to figure out where I want to go.”

These days, in addition to regularly posting Instagram pics of herself — whether in a power suit, a fuchsia sheath dress, or a swipe of bold purple lipstick — Manning noted she has been playing video games, teaching herself the programming language Rust, working on her memoir, and just starting to think about dating, declaring, “I’m not planning to be single!”

Finally, she said about her aspirations and where she’s at right now, “I have these values that I can connect with: responsibility, compassion. Those are really foundational for me. Do and say and be who you are because, no matter what happens, you are loved unconditionally.” Manning said she wishes she’d learned that lesson earlier: “Unconditional love. It is OK to be who I am.”