Category Archives: Afghan war

US foreign aid agency spent $89.7M finding jobs for 55 Afghan women

This is how government wastes your hard-earned tax dollars.

The U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) is a federal government agency that is primarily responsible for administering civilian foreign aid and assistance to “developing” countries.  With a budget of over $27 billion, USAID is one of the largest official aid agencies in the world, and accounts for more than half of all U.S. foreign assistance (which in absolute dollar terms is the highest in the world).

Elizabeth Harrington reports for Washington Free Beacon, Sept. 13, 2018, that USAID spent over $200 million on the Promoting Gender Equity in National Priority Program (aka Promote) to “empower” 75,000 women in in Afghanistan, but only found jobs for 55 women.

USAID trumpeted the program as part of building a “brighter future for Afghanistan” by empowering its women:

In the Transformation Decade (2015-2024), a new generation of Afghan leaders—both men and women—will emerge who are equipped with the education, skills, and desire to build a brighter future for Afghanistan. Promote is a joint commitment by the U.S. and Afghan Governments that will work to empower 75,000 women between the ages of 18-30 and help ensure these women are included among a new generation of Afghan political, business, and civil society leaders.

Promote aims to empower women to become leaders alongside their male counterparts, and ensure they have the skills, experience, knowledge, and networks to succeed. USAID has committed $216 million to fund the program, making it the largest women’s empowerment project in the U.S. Government’s history. Other international donors are able to contribute an additional $200 million to help expand the program.

Alas, the international donors turned out to be a pie-in-the-sky dream.

According to a new report released by the Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction (SIGAR), no other country or organization has donated to the program, other than the United States:

As of January 2018, no international donors had contributed funding to Promote. Officials from five of the seven donor countries SIGAR spoke to said they cannot financially contribute to the Promote program or that USAID’s assumption that foreign donors would contribute $200 million for the program was an unrealistic goal.

The report says the Promote program is a five-year $216 million effort. Three years into the program, however, USAID has spent $89.7 million but “has not demonstrated whether the program has made progress” toward its goals. The goal was to find new or better jobs for 2,100 women. As of September 2017, only 55 women or 2.6% found employment — which comes to $1.5 million per woman. The report concludes, “It is unclear whether the agency can deliver the opportunities it promised the women of Afghanistan.”

In addition to falling well below its job targets, the future of the program is also in doubt, as Afghanistan is unlikely to continue the program without the United States. The report points out that “This raises questions about whether Promote is sustainable at all and could put USAID’s investment in the program in jeopardy.”

The report recommends USAID should reevaluate the program before spending its remaining taxpayer-funded budget:

Given that the program has expended $89.7 of its potential $216 million, USAID has an opportunity to reassess and adjust the program and take steps to enhance its sustainability now, rather than waiting until the program is over in 2020 or 2021.

Stephen Frank of California Political Review observes:

At a cost of $1.5 million per person, the U.S. government got 55 Afghan women jobs. Any wonder we are laughed at by the rest of the world. For about $50,000 a piece they [the women] could get a college education or vocational training. But, the more that is “spent” on the women, the more jobs for U.S. government workers there is to go around.

~Eowyn

Better than Drudge Report. Check out Whatfinger News, the Internet’s conservative frontpage founded by ex-military!

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Higher education: Chelsea Manning named visiting "fellow" at Harvard

bradley manning

Harvard: Enabling a convicted traitor

I’m sure students will look forward to the lecture on turning a penis into a vagina!
From Yahoo: Chelsea Manning will be joining Harvard University as a visiting fellow at the John F. Kennedy School of Government, according to the school’s website.
Manning will speak on issues of LGBTQ identity in the military, Institute of Politics Fellows co-chairs Emily Hall and Jason Ge wrote in an announcement posted Wednesday.
“We welcome the breadth of thought-provoking viewpoints on race, gender, politics and the media,” Bill Delahunt, IOP acting director, said in the announcement.
Manning, a former Army intelligence analyst, was convicted in 2013 for leaking a huge cache of classified and sensitive documents. She was sentenced to 35 years in prison after a military judge found her guilty of six Espionage Act violations and multiple other charges relating to the dissemination of more than 700,000 classified military and State Department documents to WikiLeaks.
Manning was acquitted on the most serious charge of aiding the enemy.
After President Barack Obama commuted her sentence before leaving office, Manning has worked to re-brand herself as an activist for queer and transgender rights. She also speaks on topics related to artificial intelligence through op-ed columns for The New York Times and The Guardian, according to Harvard’s website.
Harvard’s IOP also announced three other visiting fellows: former White House press secretary Sean Spicer, CNN political commentator Robby Mook and Kansas City Mayor Sylvester “Sly” James Jr.
DCG

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Marine veteran amputee reaches summit of Mount Kilimanjaro

kionte storey and jake rath

Jake Rath (l) and Marine Kionte Storey (r)/Photo courtesy of Jake Rath


Hoorah!
From Fox News: Waking up around midnight on Aug. 25, Marine Cpl. Kionte Storey began his final trek up Mount Kilimanjaro, the culmination of months of rigorous training that led him to the top of Africa’s highest peak.
With every step he took, the 29-year-old veteran climbed higher than he ever had before. At 10:45 a.m. local time, Storey made it to the summit, 19,341 feet up – a feat made more outstanding by the fact he achieved it with a prosthetic leg.
The view, he said, was simply “amazing.”
“You look down and you are above the clouds,” he told Fox News on Tuesday. “I keep saying it was the closest thing to getting to heaven, and then the sun comes out and you can see everything.”
The trip to Africa was part of a campaign by the Bob Woodruff and Steven & Alexandra Cohen foundations called #Give2Veterans.
For the journey, Storey was joined by Jake Rath, 25, of the Steven & Alexandra Cohen Foundation, who documented the entire trip with a DSLR camera and 360-degree photo.
“The photos don’t do it justice,” he said, adding that seeing the night sky with only miles and miles of stars was breathtaking.
“To see the mountain in the starlight, thousands of stars, that was an amazing sight to see,” he added. “I was amazed by Africa.”
Storey, who joined the Marines in 2007, lost his right leg below the knee after stepping on an IED while deployed to Afghanistan in 2010. Part of his physical and mental recovery after the injury included training at Paralympic camps and hiking.
In 2013, he became the first African-American and first amputee to reach the summit of Antarctica’s Mount Vinson. “I didn’t know how my body was going to respond [in Africa],” Storey said. “My leg did well all the way up – it did a lot better than I expected.”
Both men said they had to pace themselves while on the climb, not trying to rush and give their bodies time to acclimate. Trekking through the different terrains – from jungle to savannas and finally glacier-covered stone peaks – made for a more interesting climb.
“We both trained a good amount – we were fit. The hardest was the mental challenge,” Rath said. “For each step you take, it’s the highest step you have taken.”
Through #Give2Veterans, the Steven & Alexandra Cohen Foundation is giving away up to $500,000 to help veterans. The foundation will give the Bob Woodruff Foundation $1 every time a social media post is shared using the hashtag. The campaign ends on Sept. 30.
The California native said the final push to the top of Kilimanjaro was the make-or-break moment for them because it was the point in the journey when they started questioning everything.
“You start asking yourself ‘why’ – ‘why am I doing this when I could be doing better things?,’” he said. “And then I started to think about the whys and I remembered my friends serving overseas who aren’t alive. I started thinking about amputees and showing them through my experience that anything is possible.
He added: “For us know that we were doing it for something bigger than ourselves, [we thought], ‘we are getting to the summit and that’s it.’ That’s how big our reason was for getting to the summit.”
DCG

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Bacha Bazi: Muslim man-boy pedophilia


Homosexuality is abjured and supposedly illegal in Muslim countries, but a form of homosexuality called bacha bazi is a common “cultural” practice, which, of course, points to their hypocrisy.
But bacha bazi isn’t just a homosexual practice, it is pederasty (sex between an adult male and an adolescent boy) and outright pedophilia, when the boys are prepubescent. Even worse, bacha bazi is really a form of boy-prostitution and often coerced.

From Wikipedia:

Bacha bazi is a form of pederasty which has been prevalent in Central Asia since antiquity…. Visiting Turkestan in 1872 to 1873, Eugene Schuyler observed that, “here boys and youths specially trained take the place of the dancing-girls of other countries….” [T]he dances “were by no means indecent, though they were often very lascivious.” …
Bacha bāzī (…literally “boy play”…) is a slang term in Afghanistan for a wide variety of activities involving sexual relations between older men and younger adolescent men, or boys, that sometimes includes child sexual abuse. The practitioner is commonly called bacha Baz (meaning “pedophile” in Dari)…. It may include to some extent child pornography, sexual slavery, and child prostitution in which prepubescent boys are sold to wealthy or powerful men for entertainment and sexual activities. Bacha bazi…is currently reported in various parts of Afghanistan. Force and coercion are common, and security officials state they are unable to end such practices because many of the men involved in bacha bazi-related activities are powerful and well-armed warlords…
A controversy arose after allegations surfaced that US government forces in Afghanistan…deliberately ignored bacha bazi. The US military justified this by claiming the abuse was largely the responsibility of the “local Afghan government.”

Do you still wonder why the Left in America and the West have made a tacit alliance with Islam?

See:

H/t maziel
~Eowyn

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Canada to apologize and give $8m to youngest Guantanamo Bay prisoner who pleaded guilty to murdering US soldier

omar khadr

Killer Omar Khadr: Laughing all the way to the bank


I swear, up is down and down is up in this world.
From Daily Mail: The Canadian government will apologize to former Guantanamo Bay inmate Omar Khadr and pay him around $8m (Canadian $10m) to compensate him for the abuse he suffered in detention, two sources familiar with the matter said on Tuesday.
A Canadian citizen, Khadr, now 30, was captured in Afghanistan in 2002 at age 15 after a firefight with U.S. soldiers. He pleaded guilty to killing a US army medic and became the youngest inmate held at the US military prison in Cuba. Khadr later recanted and his lawyers said he had been grossly mistreated.
The Canadian Supreme Court ruled in 2010 that Canada breached his rights by sending intelligence agents to interrogate him and by sharing the results with the United States. (According to ABC News, the abuse included sleep deprivation during interrogations.)
Khadr spent a decade in Guantanamo before being returned to Canada in 2012 to serve the rest of his sentence. He was released on bail in 2015 and lives in Edmonton, Alberta.
The Canadian government and Khadr’s lawyers reached the compensation deal, said the sources, who asked to remain anonymous given the sensitivity. Canada has reached a series of expensive settlements with citizens imprisoned abroad who alleged Ottawa was complicit in their mistreatment.
Khadr had sued Ottawa for around $15m (Canadian $20) on grounds of violating his human rights. News of the settlement was first reported by the Globe and Mail newspaper.
Khadr was taken to Afghanistan by his father, a senior al Qaeda member, who apprenticed the boy to a group of bomb makers who opened fire when U.S. troops went to their compound. The father was killed in a battle with Pakistani forces in 2003.
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, in Ireland for a visit, said the judicial process should be ending soon but declined further comment.
Spokespeople for Trudeau and Justice Minister Jody Wilson-Raybould did not immediately respond to requests for comment. Nor did Khadr’s lawyers. The U.S. Embassy was closed for the July 4 U.S. holiday.
‘It is the right decision in light of the callous and unlawful treatment meted out to Mr. Khadr with the complicity of Canadian officials,’ said Ihsaan Gardee, executive director of the National Council of Canadian Muslims.
DCG

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Mexico is world's second most deadly country, after Syria

Two days ago, I posted about the shocking violent protests and massive looting across Mexico over a 20% gas price hike, which took place four months ago in January, but which went unnoticed by our media although Mexico is America’s southern neighbor.
Here’s a video of the looting of a Mexican Walmart:

A police officer was killed on January 4 while trying to prevent robberies at a gas station in Mexico City; three people were killed amidst looting in the eastern state of Veracruz on January 5.
Now we have statistics confirming our perception of Mexico as a lawless, dangerous country.

Marc Champion reports for Bloomberg, May 9, 2017, that according to the annual Armed Conflict Survey by the International Institute for Strategic Studies (IISS), Mexico has surpassed Iraq and Afghanistan to become the world’s second-most deadly conflict zone after Syria.

In 2016, the world’s five deadliest countries are:

  1. Syria, with 50,000 fatalities.
  2. Mexico, 23,000 fatalities.
  3. Iraq, 17,000 fatalities.
  4. Afghanistan, 16,000 fatalities.
  5. Yemen, 7,000 fatalities.

What distinguishes Mexico from Syria, Iraq and Afghanistan is this:

Mexico’s violence is not from war, but from the deadly activities of the country’s criminal cartels.

Yesterday, at the Armed Conflict Survey’s launch in London, IISS director general John Chipman said Mexico’s level of bloodshed was all the more surprising because “Mexico is a conflict marked by the absence of artillery, tanks or combat aviation.” Virtually all of Mexico’s deaths were caused by small arms. The largest number of fatalities occurred in Mexican states that have become “key battlegrounds for control between competing, increasingly fragmented cartels,” with violence flaring as gangs try to clear areas of rivals so they can monopolize drug trafficking routes.

The Middle East in general and Syria in particular remained the most lethal regions on earth, with the nearly six-year-old-Syrian conflict claiming a further 50,000 lives. That brings the total number of deaths in Syria’s civil and proxy war to an estimated 290,000, almost three times the number killed in Bosnia in the early 1990s.

Overall, the number of people killed in armed conflicts around the world fell slightly last year to 157,000, from 167,000 in 2015. Nevertheless, the figure is high compared with the previous decade, while the number of civilians displaced by war continued to rise — which means more refugees.

Chipman and the report’s authors are not optimistic about the prospects for reducing these levels of violence for a number of reasons:

  1. Conflicts are becoming more urban, with siege warfare increasingly common, especially so in Syria.
  2. As new conflicts emerge, old ones tend not to get resolved but rather subside into a “simmering” state, capable of boiling over again at any moment. Examples are the low-level simmering war in Eastern Ukraine, and Turkey’s more than three-decade-old battle with the Kurdistan Workers’ Party (PKK), which exploded again last year into an urbanized insurgency that killed 3,000 people.
  3. Although the Islamic State terrorist organization lost a quarter of its territory and a higher proportion of its fighters last year, the toll on civilians is likely to increase as the group returns to more traditional insurgent tactics.
  4. The main tool of the international community to try to reduce bloodshed — the $8 billion-a-year United Nations peace-keeping forces — are increasingly overstretched and ineffectual. The UN is also by its nature too politically riven to carry out effective military operations.

President Trump, Build That Wall!

~Eowyn

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Trump nominates “Mad Dog” Mattis for Secretary of Defense

Dr. Eowyn did a blog post on Gen. Mattis back in March 2013, as Obama was purging our military. Read the post Obama regime purges 5th senior military officer: Cmdr of CENTCOM James Mattis.” Now Trump is bringing him back!
mattis-quote2
James Mattis is a retired United States Marine Corps general who last served as the 11th commander of United States Central Command. Mattis retired from the military in 2013 so his nomination will require a waiver of the National Security Act of 1947, which requires a seven-year wait period before retired military personnel can assume the role of Secretary of Defense. Mattis would be the second Secretary of Defense to receive such a waiver, following George Marshall.
Mattis is highly decorated, an experienced veteran, and pulls no punches. Read about his extensive background at Wikpedia.
He’s known for some exceptional quotes, which no doubt will make liberals’ heads explode. Here are some of his best quotes (a few are NSFW):
mattis4
james-mattis2 james-mattis3 james-mattis4
mattis-quote
mattis-quote3
The money quote to surely send liberals into head spins (and you know why):
mattis-end-quotre
oorah
DCG

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California soldiers ordered to repay enlistment bonuses

messed up
From SF Gate: Nearly 10,000 California National Guard soldiers have been ordered to repay huge enlistment bonuses a decade after signing up to serve in Iraq and Afghanistan, a newspaper reported Saturday.
The Pentagon demanded the money back after audits revealed overpayments by the California Guard under pressure to fill ranks and hit enlistment goals. If soldiers refuse, they could face interest charges, wage garnishments and tax liens, the Los Angeles Times said.
Faced with a shortage of troops at the height of the two wars, California Guard officials offered bonuses of $15,000 or more for soldiers to reenlist.
A federal investigation in 2010 found thousands of bonuses and student loan payments were improperly doled out to California Guard soldiers. About 9,700 current and retired soldiers received notices to repay some or all of their bonuses with more than $22 million recovered so far.
Soldiers said they feel betrayed at having to repay the money. “These bonuses were used to keep people in,” said Christopher Van Meter, a 42-year-old former Army captain and Iraq veteran who was awarded a Purple Heart. “People like me just got screwed.”
Van Meter said he refinanced his home mortgage to repay $25,000 in reenlistment bonuses and $21,000 in student loan repayments that the military says was improperly given to him.
The California Guard said it has to follow the law and collect the money.
“At the end of the day, the soldiers ended up paying the largest price,” Maj. Gen. Matthew Beevers, deputy commander of the California Guard told the Times. “We’d be more than happy to absolve these people of their debts. We just can’t do it. We’d be breaking the law.”
The Pentagon agency that oversees state Guard groups has said that bonus overpayments occurred in every state, but more so in California, which has 17,000 soldiers.
California Guard officials said they are helping soldiers and veterans file appeals with agencies that can erase the debts. But soldiers said it’s a long process, and there’s no guarantee they’ll win.
Retired Army major and Iraq veteran Robert D’Andrea said he was told to repay his $20,000 because auditors could not find a copy of the contract he says he signed. D’Andrea appealed and is running out of options. “Everything takes months of work, and there is no way to get your day in court,” he said. “Some benefit of the doubt has to be given to the soldier.”
tired soldier
DCG

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Thursday Funny: Jihadist gets run over by ex-girlfriend


HA HA HA HA!
Three cheers for that goat exacting revenge on its rapist-tormenter.
Seriously, if you haven’t read my post, “No joke: Muslim men really do rape goats,” please do.
H/t FOTM‘s japoa
~Eowyn

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Charlotte vet says he was fired for lowering flag on Memorial Day

serious
From Stars and Stripes: When Charlotte (NC) veteran Allen Thornwell lowered his employer’s American flag to half-staff on Memorial Day, he says he did not think to ask permission or consider the possibility that he had done anything wrong.
Instead, the 29-year-old former Marine, who served in both Iraq and Afghanistan, says he was thinking about his country, the meaning of the holiday, and his best friend, Geoff, another Marine who had killed himself two years ago after returning stateside.
On Tuesday, Thornwell was fired. A manager at the placement service that arranged the vet’s job at Time Warner Cable in Charlotte told him that the company was disturbed by Thornwell’s “passion for the flag and (his) political affiliation.”
Contacted this week, Thornwell said he remains in shock over what happened. “I’m not even mad right now,” he says. “ I don’t know what kind of moral compass you need to fire a veteran on Memorial Day for lowering the flag.”
A Time Warner Cable spokesman confirmed Friday that the former Marine “was no longer under contract” with the company but declined further comment. Thornwell said he landed the job through Principal Solutions Group, a technology-based employment service. Contacted Friday, Thornwell’s placement manager, Nicki Warren, said she was not allowed to discuss personnel matters.
Charlotte attorney Murph Archibald, whom Thornwell called after the incident, says his client should have never lost his job. “It’s disgraceful,” says Archibald, a Vietnam vet. “He didn’t do anything wrong. He’s a veteran working on Memorial Day who corrected what he thought was a disrespectful flying of the American flag … I would have taken it down myself.
Whether Time Warner was improperly displaying the flag during the country’s annual tribute to its dead veterans is a matter of debate. The U.S. Flag Code, which offers guidance on how to fly the flag during holidays, says the banner should be at half-staff until noon on Memorial Day then returned to its normal position. Thornwell said the incident took place around 2:30 p.m.
Thornwell, who was discharged in 2014, said he was aware of the holiday protocol but was moved to lower the flag anyway. He wishes now that he had asked permission. “I didn’t think of it as the property of Time Warner Cable,” he says. “It’s everybody’s flag.”

Allen Thornwell/Photo from NewsFlow24

Allen Thornwell/Photo from NewsFlow24


An angry reaction
Thornwell began Marine boot camp less than week after he graduated from Phillip O. Berry in 2005. His mother, Teresa Magaña of Charlotte, describes her son as a quiet and calm man who is passionate about the military, his country and the “rights of people.” After his tour in Afghanistan in 2008-09, she says she noticed that he began to show a greater need for order and for having things done the right way.
Thornwell was a month into a six-month contract with Time Warner when he says he got a call from work on the morning of Memorial Day, asking him to work a 2 to 7 p.m. shift. Thornwell specialized in technical support and served as a radio operator in the military. At Time Warner, he amounted to a trouble-shooter, keeping watch for service outages, then quickly assembling a team to respond and fix the problems.
On Monday he arrived at the company’s service center off Arrowood Road having left his security badge at home. A boss sent him to pick up a replacement. Waiting outside the security office, he noticed the nearby flag at full staff. Without a word to anyone, Thornwell says he marched, Marine-style, to the pole, lowered the flag to a midway point, came to full attention, then about-faced and walked away. He didn’t salute. He says Marines don’t salute when out of uniform.
Inside the security building, Thornwell said he was told by one of the guards that “It’s company policy that no one touches the flagpole.” By the time Thornwell left – and only a few minutes after he had lowered it – the flag was back at full staff.
Thornwell said he reacted angrily at what he took as a sign of disrespect to him and other vets. He can be heard cursing twice in a short video he shot at the scene with his phone. He said he wanted to send a message to military personnel around the world that “this is what the people back home think about us.” The former Marine says he was never disrespectful or out of control. In fact, he said the security guard escorting him back to his work station told him, “I fought. I understand.”
That night on Facebook, Thornwell posted the photos he took of the flag at full- and half-staff, and brief video of himself talking to the camera as he walked back to his job site. He stamped the footage “Timewarner.” He put this title on the post: “So many years wasted. I’m telling you … PEOPLE DON’T GIVE A F***.”
The next day before work, he says he got a call from Warren: “Can you tell me what happened yesterday?” Time Warner, she told him, had canceled his contract.
Failure to communicate
Did the company over-react? Did Thornwell? Who can say for sure.
Retired Marine colonel Chris Woodbridge, though, calls the incident “a very sad misunderstanding” that illustrates a widening gap between the country and its military.
Today, less than 1 percent of Americans wear a uniform. “Not only do the vast majority not serve, but they don’t really know anybody who does,” says Woodbridge, editor of the monthly Marine Corps Gazette. Thus, their perception of the men and women in uniform gravitates to stereotypical extremes: from hyper-patriotic coverage that focuses on honor and courage to more critical depictions of loner vets who are shell-shocked and violent, he says.
On the other hand, he says, veterans can experience a strong sense of alienation when they return to something “they don’t recognize and they don’t understand. Sometimes symbols, like the flag, mean a lot. Because they represent something of an ideal…(an) ideal we fought for.”
Thornwell strongly disputes the notion that he fits the stereotype of the displaced and brooding vet. He does acknowledge that he is still dealing with post-traumatic stress and other emotional problems left from his service, but he says his actions at the flagpole were never excessive.
In fact, Thornwell attributes his behavior to a deeper emotions he felt throughout the day about his country, his dead friend, and his own service. For the first time in his life, he says, he understood the true meaning of Memorial Day, and he felt it, too.
Now he needs a job. First, he would like an apology – for him and other vets.
DCG

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