Category Archives: Unions

Corporate donors to Resist Trump movement & Antifa domestic terrorists

Joe Schoffstall reports, Oct. 4, 2017, that Washington Free Beacon obtained unredacted 2015 tax forms showing the hidden donors to a prominent anti-Trump “resistance” organization, the Washington, D.C.-based Center for Community Change Action (CCCA).

CCCA does not reveal its donors. The organization has been involved in direct action against President Donald Trump and Republicans before and after last November’s elections. CCAA members sit on the boards of other prominent liberal activist groups.

The tax form obtained by Washington Beacon shows that Center for Community Change Action appears to rely heavily on a few major liberal foundations, organizations, and unions:

(1) The three largest donors are:

  • W.K. Kellogg Foundation, the source of CCCA’s largest contribution of $3 million. The foundation was created by Will Kellogg, the food manufacturer and founder of Kellogg Company.
  • Ford Foundation donated $2.35 million to CCCA. Created by the founders of the Ford Motor Company, the Ford Foundation is no longer connected to the Ford Motor Company but, inexplicably, retains the Ford name.
  • George Soros’ Open Society Foundation gave $1.75 million.

(2) Other donors include:

  • California Endowment, $524,500.
  • Marquerite Casey Foundation, $515,000.
  • Fidelity Charitable Gift, $505,100 (Fidelity itself did not donate, this figure reflects private individuals who used the company as a charitable vehicle for their own donations — whatever that means. A representative from Fidelity Charitable said the donations do not represent the views or endorsement of Fidelity Charitable or Fidelity Investments.)
  • National Immigration Law Center, $316,000.

(3) Donors to CCCA’s “social welfare” (c)(4) arm:

  • Every Citizen Counts, a nonprofit that was created by allies of Hillary Clinton to mobilize Latino and African-American voters, donated $1.75 million.
  • Soros’ Open Society Policy Center, $1.475 million.
  • Sixteen Thirty Fund, $610,000.
  • Center for Community Change, $150,000.
  • Services Employees International Union (SEIU), $150,000.
  • Atlantic Philanthropies, $75,000.
  • Tides Foundation, the largest liberal donor-advised network, donated $50,000.

Members of the anti-Trump CCCA also sit on the advisory boards of other prominent liberal and “resistance” organizations. Some examples:

  • Deepak Bhargava, CCCA’s executive director, sits on the advisory board of George Soros’s Open Society Foundation.
  • Charlene Sinclair, CCCNA’s director of reinvestment, sits on the board of directors of the Emergent Fund, which is aimed at pushing back against “immediate threats” to “immigrants, women, Muslim and Arab-American communities, black people, LGBTQ communities, and all people of color” — whatever that means. The fund consists of the Solidaire Network, the Threshold Foundation, and the Woman’s Donor Network. The Emergent Fund’s advisory board of members of prominent liberal organizations decides what organizations receive money from the group. Emergent Fund grants range from $10,000 to $50,000. Grant recipients include:
    • Black Lives Matter.
    • Center for Media Justice that was created to “organize the most under-represented communities in a national movement for media rights”.
    • Muslim Anti-Racism Collaborative.
    • United We Dream, the largest immigrant youth-led organization in the United States which is behind “sanctuary campus” anti-Trump protests across the country to protect undocumented students. United We Dream was joined by CCCA in nationwide immigration protests leading up to Trump’s inauguration.

And the worst corporate donor to the Resist Trump movement?

Mozilla, the creator of the Firefox web browser.

The company has a program called Mozilla Open Source Support (MOSS). On October 3, 2017, Mozilla announced that one of the MOSS awards is $100,000 to RiseUp, “a coordination platform used by activists across the political spectrum, to improve the security of their email service”.

RiseUp is a self-described “anti-capitalist” email server used by Antifa groups, as explained by the video below.

In an April 2016 FBI/DHS joint confidential report, the Obama administration designated Antifa as “domestic terrorists”.

That means Mozilla is actually funding and enabling domestic terrorists to email each other.

See also:

~Eowyn

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California tax board leader urged quick hirings to get state workers better pensions

jerome horton

Jerome Horton: Working hard for the taxpayer…

From Wikipedia: The State Board of Equalization (BOE) is a public agency charged with tax administration and fee collection in the state of California in the United States. The authorities of the Board fell into four broad areas: sales and use taxes, property taxes, special taxes, and acting as an appellate body for franchise and income tax appeals. The BOE is the only publicly elected tax commission in the United States. In June 2017, Governor Jerry Brown signed legislation stripping the Board of most of its powers.

Why did Brown do this? Again, from Wikipedia:

Each year, the Board spends at least $3 million on education events where elected member appear before their constituents. In 2016, it was revealed that Board Chairman Jerome Horton had spent $130,000 on designer office furniture, prompting criticism. Horton had been previously criticized over $731,835 in donations his wife’s organizations had accepted from companies with matters before the Board.

In March 2017, an audit by the California Department of Finance revealed missing funds and signs of nepotism, leading to calls for the governor to put the Board under a public trustee. In June 2017, the California Department of Justice began a criminal investigation into the members of the Board.

On June 27, 2017, Governor Jerry Brown signed into law legislation stripping the Board of its powers.  The legislation created two new departments controlled by the governor responsible for the Board’s statutory duties, the California Department of Tax Fee Administration and the California Office of Tax Appeals.

The Board still has its constitutional powers to review property tax assessments, insurer tax assessment, alcohol excise tax, and pipeline taxes. The Board will retain 400 employees, with the rest of its 4,800 workers being shifted to the new departments.

Jerome Horton has worked at the BOE for for over 20 years. Guess he has quite the shady background. Read about it here from this 2011 article about him illegally funneling money to a friend.

Par for the course for demorat politicians in California.

From Sacramento Bee (by Adam Ashton): The elected leader of a California tax agency urged its executives to speed hiring for a project in late 2012 so new employees would benefit from more generous pension plans, according to documents obtained by The Bee.

Emails show that Board of Equalization member Jerome Horton wanted the agency to quickly fill positions for a new customer service call center in Culver City during the fall of 2012 before less lucrative pension rules kicked in Jan. 1, 2013.

The documents show that the agency did not have office space for new employees. Horton, who was chairman of the board at the time, nonetheless wanted to bring on new employees for the call center and train them at other sites around Southern California. The agency ultimately hired 25 workers the last week of the year, with some of them assigned to the call center.

During the week of September 2012 that Gov. Jerry Brown signed a pension reform law, Horton wrote an email that read, “I would recommend that we do everything possible to excellerate (sic) our hiring process and assist our team members with retirement plans.”

That email and others were uncovered by auditors at the Department of Finance, who released a report earlier this year describing how elected leaders at the Board Of Equalization intervened in daily decision-making at the tax agency. The audit prompted lawmakers in June to strip the agency of most of its power and almost all of its 4,200 employees.

Until the Legislature gutted it this year, the Board of Equalization managed dozens of tax programs, collected about $60 billion a year in revenue and settled disputes between taxpayers and tax collectors.

The call center in Horton’s district stood out to auditors because they found that the five-member board that managed the agency never voted to open the site. Auditors wrote that Horton was “involved” in its creation and cited the call center as an example of an elected board member overstepping boundaries.

“The practice of individual board members intervening in the daily BOE operating activities creates inconsistencies in operations, breakdowns in centralized processes, and in certain instances result in activities contrary to state law,” the audit said.

Next week, the call center is scheduled to close. The department that the Legislature created to replace the Board of Equalization chose to consolidate the call center’s responsibilities with a larger customer service center in Sacramento.

The last two employees who worked at the Culver City call center will be reassigned to other offices by Monday, Department of Tax and Fee Administration spokesman Paul Cambra said. At some point, the new department plans to add staff at its primary Sacramento call center.

The documents that describe the Culver City call center’s creation shed light on a late 2012 hiring spree at the Board of Equalization, when 25 new employees started their jobs in between Christmas Eve and New Year’s Eve.

Ten of the hires reported for their first day of work on Dec. 31, 2012, securing the more generous pension plans that were phased out for new state employees a day later. A Board of Equalization spokesman previously told The Bee that several of the New Year’s Eve hires went to work at the Culver City call center.

Hiring spiked throughout California government in the holiday week of 2012, with people beginning public-sector jobs at triple the normal rate for the last week of the year, according to a Bee analysis of records from the California Public Employees’ Retirement System. The trend was especially pronounced at the Board of Equalization and at CalPERS.

Brown’s pension reform law rolled back some of the generous incentives lawmakers granted to public workers during the dot-com boom. As a result, public employees who started their jobs after Jan. 1, 2013 have to work seven years longer to retire with a pension that gives them 2 percent of their salary for each year service. Previously, most public employees could get that rate at age 55.

Although the Board of Equalization did not cast a vote on opening the Culver City center, documents show that Horton and the agency advanced it publicly. In November 2012, the agency published a press release announcing a job fair for the customer service center.

“What better gift to receive than a job for the holidays?” his 2012 press release read.

Horton’s messages to Board of Equalization executives in late 2012 show that he knew the agency did not have real estate for the new office. He pitched a proposal to place new workers in other offices for temporary assignments where they could learn from the agency staff members who worked for elected members.

A 2014 Board of Equalization report on the Culver City center said it opened and began taking calls on April 2, 2013.

Horton, who worked for the Board of Equalization for more than 20 years before going into politics, said the agency’s executive team approved the project and discussed its development with board members at different times in 2012.

“Although I have no authority over the hiring, training, or construction process, according to the administration, the agency followed proper protocol and obtained approval from (the state human resources department) to commence the hiring process and authorization to actually hire the employees in question,” he wrote in an email to The Bee.

DCG

NYC mayor candidate Malliotakis wants to bring back suspensions for kindergartners

nicole malliotakis

Sounds good to me. Teach kids early on that bad actions have consequences.

From NY Post: GOP mayoral nominee Nicole Malliotakis on Thursday said she would enforce stricter disciplinary measures in schools — including making it easier to suspend kids as young as 5.

Mayor de Blasio last year called for eliminating suspensions for students in kindergarten to grade 2 and instead focus on more appropriate ways to discipline kids that young.

But, in the face of strong opposition by the teachers’ union and others, the city has instead tried to reduce those types of suspensions to all but the most extreme cases.

Malliotakis wants to set the bar lower. “If a kid is being nasty or disrespectful to another student, maybe that’s not what we’re going to [go after],” Malliotakis said at a press conference outside the Department of Education headquarters near City Hall.

“But if they are disruptive to the classroom and the learning environment, then I do believe there is a place for suspension.”

In the 2015-16 school year, there were 801 suspensions of students in grades K to 2 — down 45 percent from the previous year, when there were 1,454.

The administration’s latest policy barring most suspensions for kids in those grades was instituted only this school year.

Malliotakis presented the reforms as part of a wider policy to bolster school discipline and safety in the wake of a stabbing by a Bronx high school student last week that left one teen dead and another injured.

There were no metal detectors at the school, which the NYPD said would have found the knife used in the stabbings before it was brought into the school.

With just 6 percent of schools protected by permanent metal detectors, Malliotakis said she’d work with the NYPD to identify more schools that need the devices to protect students and teachers. “I think we need to have metal detectors at our schools that are troubled,” she said.

Last month, de Blasio announced that schools are safer than ever — citing a reduction in major crimes reported to the NYPD.

But state data, which records a much wider range of school incidents, show that schools have seen the number of incidents categorized as “violent” increase each year under the de Blasio administration.

The NYPD also said this week that weapon seizures in schools are up by 48 percent in the first quarter of the school year — from July 1 to Sept. 30 — compared to the same time period last year.

Read the rest of the story here.

DCG

Connecticut spiraling into financial despair

dannel malloy

Gov. Dannel Malloy (Demorat)

Odd how high taxes can lead to a financial crisis…

From Fox News: While Illinois Opens a New Window. Connecticut has been under the microscope for its $15 billion backlog of unpaid bills, multi-billion dollar pension crisis and paralyzing political polarization, it is not the only state facing pressure to pass a spending deal by June 30.

The nation’s wealthiest state, Connecticut, is also facing a series of challenges as it remains unable to strike a budget deal with the new fiscal year approaching on Saturday. It is likely the state will enter the new month without an approved two-year budget, but a so-called provisional “mini budget” is still on the table. This last-ditch option includes $300 million to balance out spending cuts the state would be prompted to make in order to keep up with the deepening deficit.

Revenue shortfalls in the state register around $450 million for the current fiscal year alone, while estimated deficit totals are projected to clock in near $5 billion for the 2018 and 2019 fiscal years combined, according to The Connecticut Business & Industry Association. Debt outstanding levels and unfunded pension liabilities relative to revenues are among the highest of any state in the country, Moody’s Investors Service said in May.

As previously reported by FOX Business, income-tax collections are projected to fall Opens a New Window. in fiscal year 2017 for the first time since the recession.

Connecticut’s financial despair comes despite the state government’s approval of one of its largest tax rate increases ever in 2015.

The three major rating firms have downgraded the state’s credit rating in response to the ongoing budget crisis. In its most recent downgrade, which landed Connecticut with the third-lowest rating out of every state behind only New Jersey and Illinois, Moody’s said “the downgrades reflect continuing erosion of Connecticut’s finances, evidenced by the pending elimination of its rainy day fund, growing budget gaps and rising debt levels.”

However, the situation could get worse still.

On Thursday, health insurance giant Aetna announced it would move its Hartford, Connecticut-based headquarters — after more than 150 years in the state — to New York City in late 2018. The company cited a lack of access to talent as one reason it was leaving its Connecticut base, and said Thursday its long-term commitment there will depend on the state’s “economic health.”

Earlier this year, General Electric (GE) announced a similar move, shipping its headquarters from Fairfield, Connecticut to Boston, Massachusetts.

DCG

One pic shows American Federation of Teachers is monolithically Left

American Federation of Teachers (AFT) describes itself as:

The American Federation of Teachers, an affiliate of the AFL-CIO, was founded in 1916 and today represents 1.6 million members in more than 3,000 local affiliates nationwide.

Five divisions within the AFT represent the broad spectrum of the AFT’s membership: pre-K through 12th-grade teachers; paraprofessionals and other school-related personnel; higher education faculty and professional staff; federal, state and local government employees; and nurses and other healthcare professionals. In addition, the AFT represents approximately 80,000 early childhood educators and nearly 250,000 retiree members.

AFT publishes the quarterly journal American Educator.

Below is the pic that is on the front page of the latest, Summer 2017 issue of American Educator. Note the pink pussy hat, the Obama t-shirt, and the signs held by the public school teachers:

  • Black Lives Matter
  • DeVos: Public Schools Enemy No. 1 (Betsy DeVos is the Trump administration’s Secretary of Education)
  • To America’s 1st Russian Prez: Where’s Your Birth Certificate

Teachers are supposed to be objective and impartial. But like America’s journalists, they are rabidly partisan and biased. (See “Harvard University study finds MSM coverage of President Trump overwhelmingly negative”)

Just remember we are paying teachers like those in the pic with our tax dollars.

If you vote for any bond measures to funnel even more tax dollars to your local and state public schools, you are aiding and abetting AFT’s indoctrination and infesting of America’s young with their filthy Marxist ideology.

H/t FOTM‘s stlonginus

~Eowyn

Obese NY judge hasn’t worked in years but still collects fat paycheck

serious

From NY Post: An obese judge did not do his $193,000-a-year job for over three years because he was too fat — and will still retire with a hefty pension even though an ethics panel found he milked the system, The Post has learned.

Acting Supreme Court Judge Daniel J. McCullough, 65, stepped down last month, after a state ethics probe determined that he “persistently failed to report to work” since April 2014 instead of going on proper medical leave.

Had he taken such leave, McCullough would also have taken a pay cut. His decision to remain an “active” judge prompted the state Commission on Judicial Conduct to find last month that McCullough failed “to respect and comply with the law.”

“He was basically forced out,” a court source said.

Despite being pressured to leave, McCullough will take home a $143,000-a-year pension.

McCullough — who neighbors say weighs some 300 pounds — suffers a host of maladies, from morbid obesity to herniated disks in his lower back and intestinal bleeding, according to commission records.

He earned full pay even though other judges were forced to pick up the slack in his absence.

In December 2014, about eight months after he first stopped working, a judge ordered McCullough to undergo a medical exam to find out how bad his problems were.

The tests revealed that the Corona, Queens, resident, who had been on the bench since he was appointed by then-Gov. David Paterson in 2010, had “a complicated medical history which involves morbid obesity,” in addition to the other problems.

In November 2015 the chief judge ordered McCullough to undergo a second medical exam, but he ignored the order, according to the report. He was in a Long Island rehab facility at the time and vowed to return to the bench.

McCullough, a former officer with the city’s Department of Correction, learned in October 2016 that the Commission on Judicial Conduct had started investigating his absences.

On May 4, the commission found that McCullough failed “to act in a manner that promotes public confidence in the integrity and impartiality of the judiciary.”

The next day, McCullough filed for his retirement. On Monday the commission announced McCullough’s resignation, effective May 29.

“By any reasonable standard . . . three years is too long for a judge to be out of work . . . while others absorb his caseload,” said commission administrator Robert H. Tembeckjian.

McCullough escaped punishment aside from agreeing to stay off the bench.

​McCullough’s attorney, Roger Adler, said his client is still recovering from a 2016 surgical operation, never contemplated going on disability leave — and nor did the administrative judges suggest that option. “It’s a tragic situation,” Adler said. “He really hoped to come back.”

DCG

Seattle guidance counselor fined twice by state regulators – and fired as a coach over a decade ago – continues to advise students

raymond willis ap photo

Raymond Willis: Liar guiding children in Seattle/AP Photo

What a role model he is for the students. And very telling about how the unions will go to a great length to protect liars – all to “help young people.”

From Seattle Times: A guidance counselor in Seattle Public Schools has twice been fined by state regulators for selling stocks without a broker’s license. But violating the Securities Act of Washington — and misleading investorsdoes not disqualify Raymond Willis from continuing to advise students at Garfield High School, where he has worked since 2007.

As of last fall, the state Department of Financial Institutions had fined Willis and his nutritional-supplement company, the MiniHYA Corp., $37,000 in penalties and associated legal costs for fraudulently selling securities.

Willis, reached by phone last month at a Miami Beach hotel, would not discuss the matter. “That’s all been resolved,” he said, before hanging up.

Not to the satisfaction of regulators in Olympia, who say Willis failed to show up at his most recent hearing and has not paid the fines.

Michael Galletch, a lawyer representing Willis, said the guidance counselor and his company will make good. The dollar amounts collected from outside investors were very small, Galletch added, each about $1,000.  “Whatever issues they’ve got, they’ve corrected,” Galletch said. “And as they go forward, they will comply. They are not taking any more money in.”

Violating state finance laws does not necessarily bar Willis from holding onto a job providing guidance in schools, according to Nate Olson, a spokesman for the Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. “There are specific offenses that would trigger suspension and generate an investigation,” Olson said. “Fraud is not on that list.”

Short of violence or sexual crimes against a child — which can automatically trigger action by the state — it is up to school districts to file complaints. And so far, Seattle has taken no such action against Willis.

“Mr. Willis is currently employed by Seattle Public Schools. We are aware of the situation and are looking into it and will follow state law,” said a district spokesman in an emailed statement.

Neither the Washington Education Association nor the Seattle teachers union would comment on Willis’ legal situation or whether they support the fact that he continues to guide young people.

In 2014, state documents say, Willis raised more than $40,000 from several dozen investors in MiniHYA, which he said would soon market an anti-wrinkle product. It had been patented, approved by the Food and Drug Administration and subjected to “extensive ‘research clinical studies,’ ” the documents quote Willis as saying. But few of those things were true, investigators said.

“A search of filings with the United States Patent Office does not reveal that MiniHYA Corporation or Raymond Willis had any patent applications pending or that they hold any patents,” they wrote in a statement of charges dated December 2015.

Meanwhile, Willis continued to portray himself as a successful entrepreneur. Last summer, he contacted Florida real-estate agent Chris Rey, who says Willis told him he owned three large pharmaceutical companies and wanted to purchase two luxury properties for his investors — each valued at about $50 million. “That’s a life-changing commission for me,” said Rey, who works at The Nickley Group in Orlando.

Rey got to work. But his suspicions were quickly piqued. “He said his investors were part of the royal family of Abu Dhabi! It was this tall tale that just seemed extremely bizarre,” recalled Rey in an interview.

He began searching online for information about Willis, and the legal proceedings from the Department of Financial Institutions popped up, as did Willis’ day job as a guidance counselor at Garfield. “It floored me — big-time,” Rey said.

Willis has a checkered history in Seattle schools. He was fired from his coaching job at Chief Sealth High in 2005 for improperly recruiting athletes for the girls basketball team. Two years later, the district reassigned him to work as a counselor at Garfield, saying only that the loss of his coaching job didn’t affect his status as a counselor.

There, Willis, who is African American, has worked primarily with black students. There is no evidence that Willis approached students or their families about his businesses.

According to Department of Financial Institutions documents, Willis told would-be investors that by 2018 MiniHYA would be worth $160 million, and a $2,000 investment could net them up to $40,000. They also said he solicited blacks, in particular, as investors, contacting them through an online chat room aimed at African Americans.

One woman earned a salary barely above the minimum wage and had used money from her retirement account to buy into MiniHYA, hoping it would help her “earn enough money from the investment to live independently,” investigators wrote.

It was not the first time Willis has been in trouble with financial regulators.

Documents show that in 2013, after an investor sued him, alleging fraud, Willis agreed to stop selling stock in two other companies — a skin-care firm called AuJeune, and a health-care company called Ra Ghala that was marketing a mammogram machine, a bandage and “a device to pick up pet waste.”

He’d solicited more than $250,000 from 40 investors to fund those two enterprises, according to state regulators, who fined Willis $4,000 for violating securities law, an amount determined based on Willis’ ability to pay, not the gravity of the charges, said Suzanne Sarason, chief of securities enforcement with DFI.

Willis, who earns about $70,000 through his guidance-counselor job, paid the penalty and agreed to stop selling stock. But it did not stop him from advertising himself as a CEO, trusted board chairman and respected health-care industry official — all titles that appear on the CV Willis submitted to real-estate agent Rey.

That paperwork makes no mention of his job with Seattle Public Schools. “Mr. Willis’s work as a guidance counselor is community effort,” said Galletch, the lawyer. “He doesn’t do it as a regular source of income. He does it to help young people.

DCG