Category Archives: professors and intellectuals

Shocker, not: UW study finds Seattle’s minimum wage is costing jobs

shocked face

From Seattle Times: Seattle’s minimum-wage law is boosting wages for a range of low-paid workers, but the law is causing those workers as a group to lose hours, and it’s also costing jobs, according to the latest study on the measure passed by the City Council in 2014.

The report, by members of the University of Washington team studying the law’s impacts for the city of Seattle, is being published Monday by a nonprofit think tank, the National Bureau of Economic Research.

That law raises Seattle’s minimum wage gradually until it reaches $15 for all by 2021.

The UW team published its first report last July on the impact of the first jump in Seattle’s minimum wage, which went in April 2015 from $9.47 to $10 or $11 an hour, depending on business size, benefits and tips.

This latest study from the UW team looks at the effects of both the first and second jumps. The second jump, in January 2016, raised the minimum wage to $10.50 to $13. (The minimum wage has since gone up again, to the current $11 to $15. It goes up again in January to $11.50 to $15.)

The team concluded that the second jump had a far greater impact, boosting pay in low-wage jobs by about 3 percent since 2014 but also resulting in a 9 percent reduction in hours worked in such jobs. That resulted in a 6 percent drop in what employers collectively pay — and what workers earn — for those low-wage jobs.

For an average low-wage worker in Seattle, that translates into a loss of about $125 per month per job.

“If you’re a low-skilled worker with one of those jobs, $125 a month is a sizable amount of money,” said Mark Long, a UW public-policy professor and one of the authors of the report. “It can be the difference between being able to pay your rent and not being able to pay your rent.”

The report also estimated that there are about 5,000 fewer low-wage jobs in the city than there would have been without the law.

The researchers focused on “low wage” jobs — those paying under $19 an hour — and not just “minimum wage” jobs, to account for the spillover effect of employers raising the pay of those making more than minimum wage.

For instance, an employer who raised the pay of the lowest -aid workers to $13 from $11 may have then given those making $14 a boost to $14.50. (The team had also tested lower- and higher-wage thresholds for the study, and the results did not change, members said.)

To try to isolate the effects of the minimum-wage law from other factors, the UW team built a “synthetic” Seattle statistical model, aggregating areas outside King County but within the state that had previously shown numbers and trends similar to Seattle’s labor market.

The researchers then compared what happened in the real Seattle from June 2014 through September 2016 to what happened in the synthetic Seattle.

In addition to earnings, the report analyzes data on work hours— relatively rare in minimum-wage studies, the researchers said, since Washington is one of only four states that collects quarterly data on both hours and earnings.

Other studies on minimum wage have typically used lower-wage industries, such as the restaurant sector, or lower-paid groups such as teenagers, as proxies to get at employment, they said.

That was the case with a University of California, Berkeley study released last week that found Seattle’s minimum-wage law led to higher pay for restaurant workers without costing jobs in 2015 and 2016.

The UW team’s study actually corroborates the Berkeley conclusion, finding zero impact from the minimum-wage law on restaurant employment — when taking into account jobs at all wage levels within the restaurant industry.

But the UW researchers did conclude that, for low-wage restaurant workers, the law cost them work hours. (Specifically, though the actual number of hours worked by low-wage restaurant workers in Seattle increased a slight 0.1 percent from the second quarters of 2014 to 2016, the researchers’ “synthetic Seattle” model showed that if the minimum wage law hadn’t been in effect, there would have been an 11.1 percent increase in hours for those workers.)

Michael Reich, a UC Berkeley economics professor who was lead author on the Berkeley report, said he found the UW team’s report not credible for a number of reasons.

He said the UW researchers’ “synthetic” Seattle model draws only from areas in Washington that are nothing like Seattle, and the report excludes multisite businesses, which employ a large percentage of Seattle’s low-paid workforce. The latter fact was also problematic, he said, because that meant workers who left single-site businesses to work at multisite businesses were counted as job losses, not job gains in the UW study.

Reich also thought the $19 threshold was too low, and he said the UW researchers’ report “finds an unprecedented impact of wage increases on jobs, ten times more than in hundreds of minimum wage and non-minimum wage studies. … “There is no reason,” he said, that Seattle’s employers of low-paid workers “should be so much more sensitive to wage increases.”

Jacob Vigdor, a UW public policy professor and one of the authors of the UW report, stood by the team’s findings.

“When we perform the exact same analysis as the Berkeley team, we match their results, which is inconsistent with the notion that our methods create bias,” he said.

He acknowledged, and the report also says, that the study excludes multisite businesses, which include large corporations and restaurants and retail stores that own their branches directly. Single-site businesses, though — which are counted in the report — could include franchise locations that are owned separately from their corporate headquarters. Vigdor said multisite businesses were actually more likely to report staff cutbacks.

As to the substantial impact on jobs that the UW researchers found, Vigdor said: “We are concerned that it is flaws in prior studies … that have masked these responses. The fact that we find zero employment effects when using methods common in prior studies — just as those studies do — amplifies these concerns.”

He added that “Seattle’s substantial minimum-wage increase — a 37 percent rise over nine months on top of what was then the nation’s highest state minimum wage — may have induced a stronger response than the events studied in prior research.”

As to how the UW team’s findings jibe with the Seattle area’s very low unemployment rate, tight labor market, and anecdotes from hospitality employers desperately seeking low-wage workers, Vigdor said that, based on data and what he’s hearing from employers, businesses are looking to hire those with more experience.

“Traditionally, a high proportion of workers in the low-wage market are not experienced at all: teens with their first jobs, immigrants with their first jobs here,” he said. “Data is pointing to: Since we have to pay more, employers are looking for people with experience who can do the job from Day 1.”

DCG

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Unintended consequences: California’s travel ban may trip up intercollegiate athletic teams

unintended consequences

Way to punish the athletes and guarantee diminishing alumni donations. Brilliant move California…

From SF Gate: California’s newly expanded ban on state-funded travel to states that discriminate against LGBT people could trip up intercollegiate athletic teams in the coming years — not only by restricting where they may play, but how they tap new recruits.

As of Thursday, state employees — including those at the University of California and California State University — are banned from traveling on the public dime to eight states. The shunned states often appear on college teams’ travel schedules. They are: Alabama, Texas, Kansas, North Carolina, Tennessee, Kentucky, Mississippi and South Dakota.

“In terms of recruiting, under current California law our coaches would be restricted from using state funds to travel to affected states,” says a statement issued Friday by the Cal Athletics Department.

On Friday, a day after state Attorney General Xavier Becerra expanded the list from four to eight states, his office told The Chronicle it had received a request for a legal opinion on whether the ban applies to “athletic team staffs” at UC and CSU. His office did not respond when asked who had made the request.

Each of the states in the ban has enacted a discriminatory law since June 26, 2015, according to Becerra, such as preventing adoptions and foster care by lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender people (South Dakota and Alabama) or allowing school clubs to restrict membership on that basis (Kentucky). In Texas, a law that passed June 15 prohibits the state from “taking adverse action” against religious caregivers, which critics say gives them too much power over the welfare of LGBT children.

California’s travel ban took effect in January and specifically includes the two university systems. But it also exempts them from the ban to fulfill any athletic contracts they entered into with schools in the affected states before Jan. 1. That helps many major college athletic teams — for now — because they set their travel schedules with other schools sometimes years in advance.

But the exemption does not apply to collegiate postseason contests, where teams that do well could find they are headed for one of the states in question.

Eight sports are scheduled to have their top-tier NCAA regionals or championships in states affected by the travel ban within a year: Texas, Alabama, Kentucky and North Carolina. The most notable is the men’s Final Four basketball championship, to be held in San Antonio.

The others are men’s and women’s cross country, women’s gymnastics, men’s and women’s tennis, and men’s and women’s indoor track. Championships for lower-tier schools, including many in the CSU system, also are scheduled for some of the states included in the ban.

When California’s ban took effect in January, the Cal athletic department issued a statement saying: “Our intent is to support our student-athletes in their right to participate in NCAA postseason competition should they be assigned to a restricted state.”

But it’s not clear how they could do that, short of raising private donations to support not only travel costs, but also salaries for coaches and staff, and potentially insurance.

Meanwhile, Cal had been in preliminary talks for a men’s basketball series with the University of Kansas in January, when the travel ban that included Kansas took effect. “Cal got back to us and told us the state ban would prevent it,” said Jim Marchiony, a spokesman for KU athletics.

On Friday, Cal issued a new statement affirming its support of “equity, diversity and inclusion,” adding: “We have an obligation and firm commitment to remain compliant with California law.” The statement also said Cal will fulfill any contracts it signed with affected states before January.

Cal’s baseball team is signed on to play in the Frisco College Baseball Classic in March in Texas. The contract for the event, which features Texas A&M, Baylor and Louisiana Tech, was signed two years ago, former Bears head coach David Esquer said.

At California State University, several campuses have major sports teams, including Cal State Fullerton, San Diego State, Long Beach State, Fresno State and San Jose State.

The news that Texas is now included in the travel ban has made some sports fans nervous at San Jose State, and Lawrence Fan, spokesman for campus athletics, has been fielding questions — mostly about whether the San Jose Spartans will be able to play its scheduled football game at the University of Texas in September. Fan tells them not to worry. The contract was signed in September.

Nevertheless, CSU is taking a close look at the expanded travel ban and will consult with the attorney general if needed, said Toni Molle, spokeswoman for systemwide Chancellor Timothy White. However, she said, “The CSU fully intends to comply with the law, and we will not be using any state funds to pay for travel expenses to any of the banned states.”

Ricardo Vazquez, a spokesman for UC, agreed. But he said, “There have been instances where UC sports teams or researchers attending conferences have used nonstate funds to travel to the states on the list.”

Vazquez did not reply when asked for examples.

At UCLA, spokeswoman Liza David said the Department of Intercollegiate Athletics receives no state funding, but said that UCLA is “committed to promoting and protecting equity, diversity and inclusion.”

DCG

Muslims in Scotland university defecate in showers & trash bins instead of toilets

Not only do observing Muslims wipe their butts with their hands instead of toilet paper (see “Muslim chef contaminates kitchen with feces by wiping his butt with his hand, in accordance with Islamic toiletry code”), Muslims also dump their poop in all the inappropriate places.

Graeme Donohoe reports for Daily Record, June 11, 2017, that the administration of the University of Strathcylde in Glasgow, Scotland issued a memo asking its “multicultural” students and staff to stop defecating in showers and trash bins.

Note: Daily Record, a Glasgow-based newspaper founded in 1895, is the leading news brand in Scotland in number of readers.

Technology & Innovation Centre at Strathclyde University

The memo of June 8, 2017  was emailed by the operations management team of the University’s state-of-the-art Technology and Innovation Centre (TIC). It reads:

“Given the incidence of people pooing in bins, showers and the likes, can I please remind all TIC occupants that the toilets have been provided for that specific purpose. All bodily fluids, solids and toilet paper must be disposed of down the toilet. While I appreciate that the TIC population is multi-cultural and different countries have different practices, here in the UK the accepted practice is to use only the WC.”

Note: WC is the British acronym for water closet, i.e., toilet.

The memo was provoked by complaints from the university’s sanitation staff about having to clean feces from “unusual places” in the TIC building.

An “insider” said: “You wouldn’t imagine problems like this at a place at the forefront of technology. This building houses some of the most intelligent brains in the world – yet they don’t appear to know how to use the toilet. The cleaners are sick of coming across poo and used toilet paper in places it just shouldn’t be.”

Some “employees” were upset by the email. So the cucked university actually issued an apology and retracted the hygiene memo. A Strathclyde University spokeswoman said:

“We’ve apologised for any offence caused to colleagues. The email contained sentiments completely contrary to our institutional values and should not have been sent. It was recalled as soon as it came to our attention and we swiftly issued an apology to staff.”

And now for a delightful piece of information all of us should know.

Daily Record says that according to a 2012 report by UNICEF and the World Health Organization, more than 1.1 billion people in the world practice “open defecation” — i.e., pooping outside of the toilet. The largest numbers of “open defecators” are in India (626 million), followed by Indonesia (63 million), Pakistan (40 million) and Ethiopia (38 million) — all countries with large Muslim populations.

But with the invasion of Muslim “refugees” and “migrants,” “open defecation” has come to the streets of Europe, as seen in these pics of a Muslim man in Italy who, after taking a dump in an alley, washed his anus at a public drinking fountain, then drank water using the same hand.

H/t Daily Mail

See also “San Francisco goes down the toilet. Public health hazard!”.

~Eowyn

Pajama Boy approved: Half of high schools do away with class rankings ‘so as not to destroy teens’ confidence’

valedictorian meme

Raising a generation of special snowflakes.

From Daily Mail: At many American high schools, the graduation-day tradition of crowning a valedictorian is becoming a thing of the past. The ranking of students from No. 1 on down, based on grade-point averages, has been fading steadily for about the past decade.

In its place are honors that recognize everyone who scores at a certain threshold – using Latin honors, for example. This year, one school in Tennessee had 48 valedictorians.

About half of schools no longer report class rank, according to the National Association of Secondary School Principals.

Administrators worry about the college prospects of students separated by large differences in class rank despite small differences in their GPAs, and view rankings as obsolete in an era of high expectations for every student, association spokesman Bob Farrace said.

There are also concerns about intense, potentially unhealthy competition and students letting worries about rank drive their course selections.

Among those weighing a change is Lancaster High School in suburban Buffalo, where students are leading an exploration of replacing valedictorian-salutatorian recognitions with the college-style Latin honors of summa cum laude, magna cum laude and cum laude.

The principal, Cesar Marchioli, said he’s neutral on the issue, though he feels for the 11th-ranked student who falls just short of the recognition awarded to the top 10 seniors honored at the annual banquet.

Graduating Lancaster senior Connor Carrow, 17, has pressed for the switch to Latin honors since his sophomore year, well before landing just out of the top 10, at No. 14, while serving as student union president and playing varsity lacrosse and hockey.

He said it’s a better fit with the school’s collaborative and cooperative ideals. ‘You’re striving for that (honor) personally, but you’re not hoping that you’re better than these other 400 people next to you,’ said Carrow.

The view was somewhat different from the No. 1 spot occupied by Carrow’s classmate Daniel Buscaglia, who also played saxophone in several performance ensembles and volunteered in his town’s youth bureau.

While he doesn’t oppose the change, Buscaglia expects the competition in high school, although it was mostly friendly, will help him at Cornell University in the fall.

Elsewhere, commenters have peppered news websites with disparaging comparisons to giving ‘participation trophies’ to avoid hurt feelings, while supporters point out the often statistically insignificant differences that separate students.

Rankings still play an important part in aspects of the college admissions process. There are scholarships for the top-ranked students, and the number of top students at colleges is factored into college rankings.

Class ranks are also credited with improving diversity at the University of Texas, where a law guaranteed that a school’s top 10 percent would be accepted into a public university.

Colleges are adjusting to the increasing number of applications arriving without class rank, though many applications still ask for it if available.

Even so, students’ individual grades and the rigor of the curriculum they chose tend to weigh more heavily, said Melanie Gottlieb, deputy director of the American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers. ‘More and more schools are moving toward a more holistic process. They look deeper into the transcript,’ Gottlieb said.

Wisconsin’s Elmbrook School District has for several years ranked only the valedictorian and salutatorian, and only then because the state awards scholarships to schools’ top two graduates, according to Assistant Superintendent Dana Monogue.

The change has been accepted by colleges and community alike, Monogue said. ‘We are encouraged by any movement that helps students understand that they’re more than a score, that they’re more than a rank,’ she said.

Tennessee’s Rutherford County schools give the valedictorian title to every student who meets requirements that include a 4.0 grade-point average and at least 12 honors courses. Its highly ranked Central Magnet School had 48 valedictorians this year, about a quarter of its graduating class.

The day rankings came out at Hammond High School in Columbia, Maryland, students were privately told their number – but things didn’t stay private for long. ‘That was the only thing everyone was talking about,’ said Mikey Peterson, 18, who shrugged off his bottom-third finish and will attend West Virginia University in the fall.

A spokesman for the Howard County, Maryland, district said schools recognize their top 5 percent so students can include it on college applications and hasn’t considered changing.

‘There was a big emphasis on where you landed,’ said Peterson’s classmate Vicki Howard, 18. ‘It made everything 10 times more competitive.’

Peterson’s mother, Elizabeth Goshorn, said she can’t walk into his school without hearing good things about her affable son, but worries about how rankings can affect a teenager’s confidence. ‘It has such an impact on them as to how they perceive themselves if you’re putting rankings on them,’ she said.

DCG

Cal State U. faculty Lars Maischak wants President Trump hanged and Republicans executed

More terrorism from the Left.

Lars Maischak is a lecturer (which means he’s a temporary hire, and not a “ladder” faculty on track toward tenure) in the History department at California State University, Fresno.

As reported by The Daily Caller, in a series of vicious tweets, Maischak compares Trump to Hitler and calls for the hanging of President Trump, the execution of two Republicans for every illegal immigrant who’s deported, and the banning of the Republican Party — all of which Maischak justifies as “saving democracy”. (Note: Maischak has since deleted his tweets and his Twitter account)

“To save American democracy, Trump must hang. The sooner and the higher, the better. #TheResistance #DeathToFascism.”

“Has anyone started soliciting money and design drafts for a monument honoring the Trump assassin, yet?”

“#TheResistance #ethniccleansing Justice = The execution of two Republicans for each deported immigrant.

“Mercy towards racists was always the fatal weakness of good Americans. 1865, 1965, they left too many of them alive.”

“#TheResistance A democracy must not be tolerant of those who want to abolish democracy. It must vigorously defend itself. Ban the @GOP.”

The blatantly biased Cory James — who archly calls Breitbart News “far-right” but neglects to characterize Maischak with any adjective, such as the fitting label “far left” — reports for Fresno’s ABC30 that after “far-right” Breitbart called attention to Maischak’s “hang Trump” tweet, Maischak said he does not condone violence and defended his tweet by claiming it had been taken out of context and doing a Bill Clinton on the meaning of the word “must”:

“At the moment, based on my conviction that a majority of Americans are committed to Democracy, it, therefore, follows that ‘Trump must hang…,’ with the word ‘must,’ expressing a logical necessity rather than a demand or wish.”

Cal State Fresno’s president, Dr. Joseph Castro, lamely defends Maischak in a tweet and a statement:

“Fresno State understands the deep concerns that have been shared as a result of personal comments made by Professor Lars Maischak, who is a lecturer in the History Department at Fresno State. In response to these concerns, we have conducted a preliminary review to ensure that it is clear that the statements made by him were as a private citizen, not as a representative of Fresno State. Professor Maischak’s personal views and commentary, with its inclusion of violent and threatening language, is obviously inconsistent with the core values of our University.

Our primary concern is for the safety of our students and with providing a conducive learning environment. We acknowledge that our faculty have an obligation to establish and maintain ethical and professional conduct, inside and outside of the classroom.

While Fresno State is committed to state and federal constitutional rights of free speech, the content of statements by Dr. Maischak warrants further review and consideration. The review of these and any other statements will be conducted in the context of rights of free expression, but also for potential direct threats of violence that may violate the law.

The University is taking this matter seriously and handling it in accordance with applicable law and policy, as well as our traditions of academic freedom and the requirements of the faculty collective bargaining unit agreement. The University will fully cooperate with any investigations conducted by Federal officials.”

– Fresno State President Joseph I. Castro

Reportedly, Maischak has been put on paid leave. As you can see by going here, Maischak is still listed as a History lecturer at Cal State Fresno.

Here’s contact info. for you to register your objection and call for the firing of Maischak. This man has no business teaching America’s youth:

Lars Maischak

Email: lmaischak@csufresno.edu
If that doesn’t work, try this: lmaischak@yahoo.com
Phone: (410) 366-7458

Dr. Joseph Castro, President

Office of the President
5200 N. Barton Ave., M/S ML48
Fresno, CA 93740
Phone: 559.278.2324
Feedback page: http://www.fresnostate.edu/president/feedback/feedback-form.html

Lars Maischak is not only a terrorist, he’s also an utter failure as an academic, being 48 years old and just a temp lecturer. There are 48-year-old academics who are tenured full professors.

Report Lars Maischak to the Secret Service:

See also “The Left are trying to start a civil war“.

H/t Henry Makow and FOTM‘s TPR

The Left are trying to start a civil war

After the defeat of Hillary Clinton in last year’s presidential election, the Left are taking America’s decades-old “culture war” to a hot war of actual acts of violence and terrorism.

Kathy Griffin wants to behead President Trump

Both before and after President Trump was inaugurated, the Left poured on their hate and death threats. See:

But their targets aren’t just Trump and his family. It’s now open season on the Right — Trump supporters, Republicans, AltRight and conservatives:

Here are three more less-known recent incidents.

(1) Last Tuesday, June 13, 2017, shots were fired at a truck carrying a “Make America Great Again” flag and an American flag on eastbound I-465 in Indiana.

Fox59 reports that officers believe the shots were fired from a newer white 4-door Chevrolet Malibu with a Louisiana plate near Emerson Avenue around 4 p.m. The victim and a witness informed police that the Malibu pulled up next to the pickup truck, a passenger held a handgun out of the window and then a male fired several shots. Fortunately, no one was injured in the incident.

The driver of the Malibu is described as a black male around the age of 23; the passenger is a light skinned black male with a sleeve tattoo on his right arm. Indiana state police are asking anyone who may have witnessed the shooting to call 317-899-8577.

(2) Yesterday, June 15, threatening letters containing a white powdery substance were placed in the mailboxes of Republican Karen Handel’s neighborhood in Roswell, Georgia.

Karen Handel is the former Secretary of State of Georgia (2007-2010) who is currently a candidate for Georgia’s 6th Congressional District Special Election.

Washington Free Beacon reports that police blocked off Georgia Republican Karen Handel’s neighborhood after threatening letters containing a white powdery substance were left in the mailboxes of Handel and her neighbors.

A neighborhood resident posted a picture (see below) of the contents of the envelope she received, including a threatening letter in graphic language, saying:

“Your neighbor Karen Handel is a dirty fascist cunt but I’m sure you already knew that. Take a whiff of the powder and join her in the hospital you Bourgeoisie motherfuckers. RESIST THE FASCIST TAKEOVER!!!! STRING UP THE COLLABORATORS!”

James Hodgkinson, Rep. Scalise’s shooter, had also ranted about Handel on Facebook, calling her a “Republican bitch”:

“Republican Bitch Wants People to Work for Slave Wages, when a Livable Wage is the Only Way to Go! Vote Blue, It’s Right for You!”

(3) Antifa post guidelines on how to spike pet treats with sharp objects and scatter them in conservative neighborhoods.

Yesterday, /pol/ News Forever @polNewsForever retweeted a tweet calling for targeting areas in Texas “where most altright and far right supporters live” with dog treats “weaponized” with nails. Here’s the original tweet:

American Renaissance has put together an anti-Trump hate map showing the Left’s growing violence against the Right — criminal incidents in which Trump supporters were targeted for political reasons. Each marker on the map shows the location of an anti-Trump hate crime: Red markers signify violent crimes; blue markers, property crimes; purple markers, “other” crimes.

The above shows that the Left are actively fomenting a civil war, which will happen when the Right have had enough and decide to push back.

As with Muslims, where are the voices of “moderate” Democrats/Progressives condemning the Left’s hate rhetoric and acts of violence? Where are the denunciations from Democrat leaders Hillary Clinton, Barack Obama, Nancy Pelosi, et al.?

See also these other posts on the Left’s hate rhetoric and violence:

See “Conservative Blogger Found Guilty on 21 Counts for Self-Defense with a Firearm, Faces up to 50 Years in Prison” for what happened to a conservative, Michael Strickland, who fought back.

Handel is running neck-to-neck (47% vs. 47%) against Democrat Ossoff in Georgia’s Special House Election. Donate to her campaign here.

~Eowyn

Police arrest Calif. ethics prof. Eric Clanton for Antifa bikelock assaults at Berkeley protest

On Saturday, April 15, 2017, in Civic Center Park of Berkeley, California, a Patriots Rally by Trump supporters, including members of Oathkeepers, turned violent when radical leftists in black masks and black clothing, who call themselves Antifa (anti-fascists), launched a counter-rally and clashed with the patriots.

In a memo to Berkeley mayor and the City Council on the April 15 demonstration, Berkeley police chief Andrew Greenwood identified the Antifa as the instigators of violence. Greenwood wrote:

“On April 15, groups initially remained separated in the park. At one point, about three dozen ‘antifa’ entered the park over fencing, ultimately confronting demonstrators, and escalating violence, with fights and assaults breaking out.”

The day ended with eleven people being injured and the arrest of 20 people “for their roles in the violence at Civic Center Park”. The charges included assault with a deadly weapon, battery, and committing a criminal offense while wearing a mask. Authorities said at the time that they will pursue additional arrests as they “review social media and video footage”. (Source: Berkeleyside)

Meanwhile, citizen journalists and sleuths went to work, combing through videos and photos of the violent clash to unmask the Antifa thugs.

On April 19, five days after the clash, online sleuths of 4chan‘s /pol/ News Network and Rebel Media correspondent Jack Posobiec identified one of the masked Antifa rioters who had assaulted people with a bike-lock as a California college professor named Eric Clanton.

Among the people Clanton had assaulted with a bikelock on April 15 was this man in a red t-shirt (see below).

Here’s a video explaining how 4chan sleuths identified Eric Clanton as the bikelock thug:

Clanton claims to have an M.A. in Philosophy from San Francisco State University, and a B.A. in Philosophy from California State University, Bakersfield.

Clanton had taught philosophy at San Francisco State University. At the time of the April 15 riot, he was teaching at Diablo Valley College in Pleasant Hill, CA. Ironically, one of his teaching and research subjects is ethics.

His faculty profile at Diablo Valley College, now taken down, said:

Eric Clanton

Faculty – Philosophy, Pleasant Hill Campus

Eric has been teaching at DVC since 2015. He teaches introduction to philosophy with a background in teaching ethics, critical thinking, and comparative philosophy East/West. His primary research interests are ethics and politics. His work in political philosophy also centers on mass incarceration and the prison system. He is currently exploring restorative justice from an anti-authoritarian perspective.

After he was outed online, Clanton panicked. He scrubbed his social media, went underground and, pretending to ask for a friend, sought legal advice on Reddit (source: Dark Triad Man):

“My really good friend is being accused on social media of attacking someone at a protest and now his name is being smeared on social media. Does he have any recourse and can he be in any legal (civil or criminal) trouble because of these rumors?”

Yesterday, May 24, 2017, Berkeley police finally arrested Eric Clanton.

From Berkeleyside:

“Eric Clanton, a former teacher at Diablo Valley College, was arrested by Berkeley police . . . on suspicion of three counts of assault with a deadly weapon identified as a U-lock bike lock, and one of those assaults is alleged to have caused a significant injury. […]

Until Wednesday night, Berkeley investigators had declined to say whether they were looking into Clanton, despite the outcry online calling for his arrest. Wednesday, officers arrested him in Oakland at 12:15 p.m. He is being held at Berkeley Jail with a bail of $200,000, according to Alameda County sheriff’s office records online. Clanton, whose listed occupation is college professor, is scheduled for arraignment Friday. Police said they have identified three victims in the case. All three were struck in the head or neck with a bike lock, police said.”

Update:

Yesterday, May 26, Eric Clanton appeared in Alameda County Superior Court and was formally charged with four counts of assault with a deadly weapon, a felony, with the special allegation of causing great bodily injury to Sean Stiles. The charges include the misdemeanor offense of wearing a mask to evade identification. If convicted, Clanton could be sent to prison. (Read the full complaint here.)

Court papers reveal that Clanton struck at least seven people in the head. One person received a head laceration that required five staples to fix. Another was uninjured but had a piece of his helmet broken off. A third was struck across the neck and back, police said.

Clanton pleaded not guilty to all charges. Judge Thomas Nixon set bail at $100,000.

Clanton is represented by longtime “social justice” activist Dan Siegel whom Clanton had retained prior to his arrest. In a statement to the judge, Siegel justified Clanton’s violence by blaming so-called racists: “This case arises in the context of a demonstration by a group of loosely described out-of-town, right wingers… who uttered racist and homophobic comments and engaged in pushing and shoving” with counter-demonstrators. (Source: Berkeleyside, which closed this report to comments, contrary to the newsletter’s standard policy)

~Eowyn