Category Archives: Insanity

The ‘Naked Commie’ Caption Contest

This is the 176th world-famous FOTM Caption Contest!

Here’s the pic:

May Day 2018 Seattle

About the pic: On May 1, 2018, celebrated by commies as International Workers’ Day, a man mocks President Trump in the streets of Seattle, Washington.

You know the drill:

  • Enter the contest by submitting your caption as a comment on this thread (scroll down until you see the “LEAVE A REPLY” box), not via email or on Facebook.
  • The winner of the Caption Contest will get a gorgeous Award Certificate of Excellence and a year’s free subscription to FOTM! :D
  • FOTM writers will vote for the winner.
  • Any captions proffered by FOTM writers, no matter how brilliant (ha ha), will not be considered. :(

This contest will be closed in a week, at the end of next Tuesday, May 22, 2018.

To get the contest going, here’s my caption:

Liberalism really is a mental disorder.

For the winner of our last Caption Contest, go here.

~Eowyn

Abortionist: Women who abort should get a Mother’s Day card

Ghazaleh Moayedi, D.O., is an abortionist — an obstetrician-gynecologist at Queen’s Medical Center in Honolulu, Hawaii.

This twisted woman says that motherhood made her a better abortionist, and bemoans the fact that there isn’t a Mother’s Day card for women who abort, i.e., kill their child because “abortion is an act of love”.

Ghazaleh Moayedi

From her op/ed, “How Motherhood Made Me a Better Abortion Provider,” Glamour magazine, May 11, 2018:

“Are you still planning on doing abortions after you have your baby?” a colleague asked. I was visibly pregnant in my third trimester and pushing a patient to the operating room. I was surprised at the question. We were friends, and most of my coworkers knew I became a doctor in order to provide abortion care. “Of course I am, why?” I asked her. She replied: “I just thought it might be hard to do abortions once you have a baby yourself.”

“Nothing’s going to change,” I said with a smile.

I became pregnant halfway through my second year of ob-gyn residency training. Despite working in a profession dedicated to the care of pregnant women, I was surprised to find that having a baby as a female resident is strongly discouraged. I immediately came under scrutiny from my superiors. There were “jokes” about forcing other residents to be on birth control to prevent spreading the disease. I was determined not to show any weakness in my training as a result of my pregnancy . . . . Nothing was going to change . . . .

I am often asked whether providing abortion care is hard as a mother . . . . Holding my baby’s tiny hands in my own not only strengthened my commitment to providing compassionate abortion care but also exposed how I needed to commit to supporting mothers in all aspects of my care . . . .

There is no Mother’s Day card to celebrate abortion. There are Mother’s Day cards to celebrate giving hugs, wiping noses, and kissing boo-boos—actions that are seen as the core of how a mother expresses love for her children. For my patients who were not parents, and did not want to be at that moment, or who never want to be a parent, I recognize their abortions as an act of intentional motherhood. Choosing when to parent is an act of love. For my patients that were already parenting, I feel the deep love they had both for the children they had and for the pregnancies they were ending. Choosing an abortion is an act of love.

Abortion is an act of love!

Yeah, I love you so much, I killed you. That’s how much I love you.

“Woe unto them that call evil good, and good evil; that put darkness for light, and light for darkness; that put bitter for sweet, and sweet for bitter!” –Isaiah 5:20

On this Mother’s Day, thank your mother that she didn’t abort you.

“Thank You” and “God bless you” to all the mothers of Fellowship of the Minds who chose not to abort.

H/t LifeNews and FOTM‘s stlonginus

~Eowyn

Gun control, Chiraq style: 74 people shot during the last week

chicago

Nineteen of those were shot this past Saturday, including a 12-year-old boy.

My first thought: The weather must be warming up in Chiraq…

My second thought: Why isn’t Alyssa Milano marching for more #GunControlNow in Chiraq?

From Yahoo: The city of Chicago had seen a large reduction in murders and shootings for the first four months of 2018, but as temperatures have increased, so has crime. 

The Chicago Police Department recorded that at least 74 people were shot in the country’s third-largest city, with 28 of those shootings occurring between Friday evening and Sunday morning. Two men in their 20s were shot outside an East Garfield Park building just hours after two other people were shot on the exact same block Sunday, the Chicago Sun-Times reported. Police had previously been hopeful that gun violence was on a downward trend after seeing more than 1,400 total homicides between 2016 and 2017. The city’s shooting victims are predominately on the city’s south and west sides.

Two men were killed and at least 16 people were wounded in shootings on Saturday alone. Two women were shot outside of Mount Sinai Hospital while waiting for news on the condition of a relative shot earlier that morning.

While police have noted that many of the dozens of shootings this week appear to be gang-related, the majority of victims are under 30 including several teenagers and a 12-year-old boy on the city’s Westside. Additionally, a 4-year-old girl was shot in the shoulder Tuesday as she sat with her parents on the family’s South Side porch. A 15-year-old boy was struck in the head by a bullet Wednesday afternoon as he rode a city bus home from school. The boy is listed in stable condition and police told USA Today they believe he was was not targeted, but instead was hit by errant gunfire.

“It infuriates me that we have a good kid doing what we all expect him to do, and he’s a victim of something like this,” Police Superintendent Eddie Johnson told reporters. “This is why we have to have common sense gun legislation in this country. Not just this city, this state, but in this country, to stop things like this from happening.”

Um, you have PLENTY of “common sense” gun legislation in Illinois…CRIMINALS DON’T FOLLOW THE LAWS!

Compared to 2017, Chicago saw a 22.3 percent reduction in murders and a 26.5 percent decrease in shooting incidents from January 1 through the end of April, according to data collected by the city and the University of Chicago Crime Lab. April was the 14th consecutive month in which the city saw a year-over-year decline in gun violence incidents, police spokesman Anthony Guglielmi told reporters.

Chicago recorded 721 people being shot in 2018 through April 29, which was 319 fewer than 2017. But homicides and gun violence historically peak in summer, warmer months. April was the fourth-coldest on record this year but rising temperatures over the past week were reflected in the spike in gun violence.

In 2017, there were 1,040 shootings across the city of Chicago and 2016 saw the most shootings of the past seven years with 1,115 recorded shooting victims.

See also:

DCG

Anal Cancer: the new ‘gay’ and female epidemic

There are consequences to behaviors.

One of the consequences of anal sex is anal cancer.

Last September, The Conversation (which describes itself as “academic rigor, journalistic flair) reported on an “anal cancer epidemic” among gay and bisexual men.

According to the American Cancer Society, although anal cancer is fairly rare – much less common than cancer of the colon or rectum — the number of new anal cancer cases has been rising for many years. It is estimated there will be 8,580 new anal cancer cases in 2018. In the absence of national screening recommendations, more than 50% of these individuals will be diagnosed at stage III or IV, when five-year survival is less than 40%. In other words, this is a major public health concern.

The Conversation identified two risk factors:

(1) Being HIV-positive, the virus that leads to AIDS:

Almost 620,000 gay and bisexual men in the United States were living with HIV in 2014, and 100,000 of these men were not even aware of their infection. These men are 100 times more likely to have anal cancer than HIV-negative men who exclusively have sex with women. Yet, no national screening guidelines exist for anal cancer prevention in any population….

Some in the medical community have identified anal cancer as the next big crisis among HIV-infected gay and bisexual men. Initiation of anti-retroviral therapy in the 1990s greatly reduced the AIDS-related death rate and improved survival. However, this improvement in survival led to an increase in the lifetime risk of developing anal cancer, especially among HIV-positive gay and bisexual men.

The Conversation estimates that a 40-year-old HIV-positive male who has sex with males has an 8.2% lifetime risk of developing anal cancer, and a 4.8% risk of death from anal cancer.

(2) HPV (human papillomavirus) infection:

Anal cancer is typically preceded by persistent HPV infection that often leads to precancer. HPV is common among U.S. men; about one out of two men in the general population has HPV infection. HPV typically clears naturally; however, under certain circumstances, it might persist longer and might progress to anal precancer. If it remains undetected, untreated or inadequately treated, this precancer can progress to anal cancer.

Curiously, no where in The Conversation article is there mention of the behavior that puts one at risk for HIV-HPV infection and anal cancer — anal sex.

Openly ‘gay’ actor John Barrowman

But the American Cancer Society does identify certain sexual activities as risk-factors:

  • Having multiple sex partners increases the risk of infection with HIV and HPV. It also increases the risk of anal cancer.
  • Receptive anal sex also increases the risk of anal cancer in both men and women. Because of this, men who have sex with men have a high risk of this cancer.

The American Cancer Society also alerts us to another alarming fact about anal cancer: More women than men get anal cancer, and more women than men die from it. The Society’s estimates for anal cancer in 2018 are:

  • About 8,580 new cases (5,620 in women and 2,960 in men)
  • About 1,160 deaths (680 in women and 480 in men)

Beginning in the “gay” culture, anal sex has now been “popularized” among heterosexuals via systematic propaganda by the media and via pornography. See:

But the simple truth is this: The human body is not designed to accommodate anal intercourse:

  • The rectum is significantly different from the vagina with regard to suitability for penetration by a penis. The vagina has natural lubricants and is composed of a mucus membrane with a multi-layer stratified squamous epithelium that allows it to endure friction without damage and to resist the immunological actions caused by semen and sperm. In contrast, the anus is a delicate mechanism of small muscles that comprise an “exit-only” passage. With repeated trauma, friction and stretching, the sphincter loses its tone and its ability to maintain a tight seal. Consequently, anal intercourse leads to leakage of fecal material that can easily become chronic.
  • The intestine has only a single layer of cells separating it from blood. Therefore, any organisms that are introduced into the rectum have a much easier time establishing a foothold for infection than they would in a vagina. The single layer tissue cannot withstand the friction associated with penile penetration, resulting in traumas that expose both participants to blood, organisms in feces, and a mixing of bodily fluids.
  • Ejaculate has components that are immunosuppressive, designed to allow the sperm to evade the immune defenses of the female. The fragility of the anus and rectum, along with the immunosuppressive effect of ejaculate, make anal-genital intercourse a most efficient manner of transmitting HIV, HPV and other infections, as well as anal cancer.

Megan Fox of PJ Media writes:

Very little is written on the subject, even though we know anal prolapses, fissures, tears, and infections are common with anal sex. No one will report on it. Instead, Teen Vogue is writing “how to” guides about anal sex (and cancer) for your minor daughters. What we have here is a clear warning that putting things into the anus that don’t belong there is a very bad idea—and yet the media is unable to report that clearly. Why? Could it be the LGBTQWTF lobby doesn’t want them to? Researching the negative effects of anal sex is darn near impossible….

If anal sex puts people at high risk for an aggressive cancer, shouldn’t they know it?

See also:

~Eowyn

Sacramento city homeless program offers bonuses to groups attending meetings and writing policies

government solve all problems

I guess this makes sense when you are using “free” tax payer dollars.

From Sacramento Bee: The city of Sacramento is offering hefty financial bonuses to hospitals, health plans and government and nonprofit agencies for attending meetings and helping to launch its $64 million Whole Person Care program on homelessness.

Mayor Darrell Steinberg and other Sacramento leaders consider the pilot program central to achieving their goal of housing 2,000 homeless people by 2020. It is designed to bring together health service providers to treat homeless patients and avoid costly emergency medical care, as well as to find them a stable place to live.

“Partner organizations” can collect payments of $100,000 to $250,000 for participating in meetings and hitting various “performance targets” at the end of each year of the program, which runs through 2020, said the city’s homeless services coordinator, Emily Halcon. Initial targets include attending a certain number of meetings and developing internal policies, patient screening tools and referral criteria, Halcon said.

Should all partners hit their goals for the duration of the program, incentive payments would total $7.9 million. Whole Person Care is funded by local money and federal matching dollars and administered by the state.

Participants include the Sacramento police and fire departments, hospital systems, federally funded health clinics, health plans, housing agencies and social service providers, including Sacramento Steps Forward and the Salvation Army. These agencies and others are working with the city to develop a system that would keep homeless people out of emergency rooms and steer them toward behavioral health services, insurance coverage and housing.

The financial incentives are an unusual but potentially effective way to ensure that all of the agencies involved give 100 percent to a program that has lofty goals and a short timeline, Halcon said.

“They are in recognition that, to truly change systems and service delivery, you need a lot of intensive work” from service providers, each of which will be a crucial part of the program’s success, she said.

“It’s not just, ‘Show up at a meeting and get funds,'” she said. The monthly steering committee meetings are intensive sessions “where we expect active participation, presentations and input from all of our partners” who then follow up with additional work.

“We see the incentive payments primarily as compensation for efforts already provided,” Halcon continued.

Such payments are highly unusual, several experts said. Bob Erlenbusch, executive director of the Sacramento Regional Coalition to End Homelessness, questioned why entities “are getting paid for something they should already be doing.”

“It’s outrageous,” he said. “I’ve never heard of anything like it in 30 years of working on homeless issues. Attending meetings and working on the project should be part of their job,” Erlenbusch said. “That money could go a long way toward immediately helping people. How many people could we immediately house for that amount of money?”

Whole Person Care pilot projects throughout the state are allowed to pay partners that help “ensure the overall success” of their program, said Carol Sloan, public information officer for the California Department of Health Care Services, which administers the project.

“Sacramento took a creative approach and incentivized their providers to participate in order to encourage and recognize their engagement above and beyond their traditional workload,” Sloan said. The approach, she said, has led to “the development of new relationships and new policies and partnerships that we hope will be sustained at the local levels after the sunset of the pilot project.”

Ryan Loofbourrow, chief executive officer of the nonprofit Sacramento Steps Forward, said he was “pleasantly surprised” to learn that his agency would get incentives for participating in Whole Person Care, locally named Pathways to Health + Home.

“This is the first time I’ve heard of it happening,” he said. “But in this type of effort it makes sense to me. You’re pulling together so many different groups that in addition to fulfilling their daily mission have to invest a lot of time” in a new project.

Loofbourrow said his agency has spent “hundreds of hours” in staff time on the Pathways effort.  “We’re dedicated to it, regardless” of the payments, he said. “But the financial incentives certainly has made making this big commitment a bit easier.”

Sacramento Steps Forward, which distributes millions in federal funding to local groups that aid homeless people, stands to earn $250,000 this year if it fulfills all of its commitments, according to planning documents for the local Whole Person Care program.

Read the rest of the story here.

DCG

US government seeking one million volunteers for massive study of DNA, health habits

What could possibly go wrong?

From NY Post: Wanted: a million people willing to share their DNA and 10 years of health habits, big and small, for science.

On Sunday, the US government will open nationwide enrollment for an ambitious experiment: If they can build a large enough database comparing the genetics, lifestyles and environments of people from all walks of life, researchers hope to learn why some escape illness and others don’t, and better customize ways to prevent and treat disease.

“A national adventure that is going to transform medical care” is how Dr. Francis Collins, director of the National Institutes of Health, describes his agency’s All of Us Research Program.

Congress has authorized $1.45 billion over 10 years for the project. It all hinges on whether enough people around the country will sign up, either online or through participating health centers.

There’s already interest: More than 25,000 people got early entry to the project over the past year through an invitation-only pilot test run by participating universities and health providers.

Why study so many? Most of today’s medical care is based on what happened to the average person in short studies of a few hundred or thousand patients with a specific health condition.

And most people who volunteer for those studies are white, leaving questions about the best care for people of different races.

“One-size-fits-all is far from an optimal strategy,” Collins said Tuesday in announcing enrollment for All of Us.

The project involves “precision medicine,” using traits that make us unique to forecast and treat disease. Learning enough to individualize care requires studying a massive number of participants: the healthy and not-so-healthy, young and old, rural and urban, blue-collar and white-collar — and people of all races and ethnicities.

For now, participants must be at least 18. Next year, the study will open to children, too.

While there are other big “biobanks” of genetic data from at least 100,000 people, the NIH project aims to be the largest and most diverse of its kind. At least half of the participants must be from groups traditionally under-represented in medical research, Collins stressed.

Genes aren’t the whole story: Sure, what genes you harbor can raise your risk for various diseases. But other factors can increase or reduce some genetic risks.

So first volunteers will share electronic health records and blood samples, and answer periodic questionnaires about their diet, sleep, environmental exposures and other lifestyle factors. Theymight wear fitness trackers and other sensors.

And later this year they’ll start undergoing genetic testing, initially to look for so-called “variants” in DNA that affect disease risk, similar to what some private companies now sell, Collins said. Fully mapping the genetic code is too pricey now for a million people, but that more comprehensive approach eventually will be used with some participants, too.

Among the first lessons Collins hopes to learn is about resilience: Why do some people stay healthy despite smoking or pollution or poor nutrition? “We have no idea how those people escape those odds,” he said.

Learn your results: Unlike with most medical studies, participants can choose to see their own test results and share them with their physician long before the study reaches any big-picture conclusions. A caution: There are still many questions about how best to use the results of genetic tests. Still, “we will try to help their doctors sort through what it means,” Collins said.

One result that might bring a quick benefit: Genetic variants can signal who is prone to side effects from more than 100 drugs, information that could be used to prescribe a safer drug if only their doctors knew, Collins added.

Protecting privacy: The privacy of DNA databases made headlines last week when investigators used a free genealogy website to track down a suspected California serial killer. That’s pretty different than the security under which medical DNA must be handled.

NIH said it has taken as many steps as possible to safeguard against would-be hackers. Volunteers’ medical data is stripped of identifying information and replaced with a code. Only scientists meeting specific security requirements will be cleared to study the data. NIH also said federal “certificates of confidentiality” prohibit disclosure to law enforcement.

Privacy wasn’t a worry for Michelle McNeely, 41, an early participant at Dallas’ Baylor Scot & White Health System. She underwent breast cancer treatment in 2016 and considers taking part in All of Us a way to give back.

“If they can use my genes and someone’s genes in California and someone’s genes in New York to find some common ground, to help discover some cure — they can use my genes all day long,” McNeely said.

DCG

Gun control, Chiraq style: 12 people shot on Tuesday, one killed

black lives2

No where to be seen in Chicago…

From MyFoxChicago: Twelve people were wounded, including a 4-year-old girl, and one person was killed Tuesday in shootings across the city.

The day’s only fatal shooting happened about 10:20 p.m. in the West Side Austin neighborhood. The 32-year-old was in a vehicle in the 4800 block of West Washington when he suffered a gunshot wound to the torso, according to Chicago Police. A relative then drove him to Stroger Hospital, where he was pronounced dead. The Cook County Medical Examiner’s Office confirmed the death Wednesday but did not release the man’s identity pending notification of his family.

A 4-year-old girl was among the 12 wounded throughout the day. The girl was shot while sitting on a porch with her parents in the South Side Gresham neighborhood.

She was shot in the shoulder at 7:38 p.m. in the 1000 block of West 88th when a dark-colored sedan pulled up and someone inside fired shots, police said. She was taken to Saints Mary and Elizabeth Medical Center, where her condition stabilized, police said. Area South detectives were investigating the shooting.

A 17-year-old boy was also wounded a few hours later in the West Side Lawndale neighborhood. The boy was walking about 10:15 p.m. in the 1200 block of South Avers when someone shot him in his arm. He was taken to Saint Anthony Hospital, where his condition stabilized, police said.

Three people were shot in East Garfield Park throughout the night.

Two were seriously wounded when a vehicle pulled up and someone inside opened fire while they were standing outside at 9:47 p.m. in the 3300 block of West Gladys. A 19-year-old woman was shot in the abdomen and taken to Stroger Hospital in serious condition and a 24-year-old man suffered a gunshot wound to the buttocks. He was taken to Mount Sinai Hospital, where he was also listed in serious condition.

A 21-year-old man was shot in the hand at 6:09 p.m. in the 500 block of North Ridgeway in East Garfield Park. He was in good condition and the circumstances of the shooting weren’t immediately known, police said.

Two 25-year-old men were also grazed by bullets in separate incidents in East Garfield Park.

One man suffered a graze wound to the left leg while walking at 1:28 a.m. in the 3200 block of West Washington and the other suffered graze wound to his wrist about 7:05 p.m. in the 3100 block of West Madison, police said.

A bullet also grazed a 29-year-old man’s head about 3:30 a.m. in the 2300 block of West Jackson on the Near West Side.

The day’s final shooting happened at 11:58 p.m. in the Little Village neighborhood. A man was talking to a woman who was sitting in a vehicle when a dark colored vehicle pulled up and someone inside fired shots at 11:58 p.m. in the 2200 block of South Millard.

The man, 26, was struck in the shoulder and took himself to Mount Sinai Hospital where he is in fair condition. A 29-year-old woman who was sitting on a porch when the shooting occurred was hit in the stomach by a fragment. She was also taken to Mount Sinai where she was in good condition, police said.

Two men were also shot in Brainerd and in West Garfield Park.

See also:

DCG