Category Archives: Acts of Kindness

Today you will be with Me in Paradise

“And He said to him, “Truly I say to you, today you will be with Me in Paradise.”  – Luke 23:43

Who was the thief on the cross?

We don’t know much about him, except that he was being executed for a capitol crime, that he also hurled insults at Jesus, and that he came to his senses, and asked the Lord to remember him when He comes into his kingdom.

He was clearly not a person we would think of as deserving respect. And yet, that one final request to Jesus brought him through the worst imaginable thing.

So how loving and forgiving is Jesus?

He was so loving that even at the most horrible moment, He could extend grace and forgiveness to someone who had mocked within the previous hour.

In fact, the only reason Jesus allowed Himself to be crucified was so one such as this could be forgiven.

So let’s do the math. Within 6 hours of this statement, both Jesus and the former thief were no longer on a cross, no longer in pain, but were walking in paradise, never to suffer again.


RIP my friend

TD

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Dog releases trapped bird into the wild

A bird flew into a house, and is trapped.

The black Labrador gently picks up the bird with its mouth, goes outside, and releases the bird.

Simply remarkable.

And yet we are told by sneering scientists that animals do not reason, deliberate, or act with intention, even less with compassion, and that we humans alone are “rational”.

~Eowyn

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Lionheart’s transformation

Luvs a happy ending!

DCG

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Dog refuses to leave roadside where owner was killed 18 months ago

The Sun reports, July 16, 2019, that a dog in Nafpaktos, a coastal city in western Greece, refuses to leave the roadside where his owner, 40-year-old Haris, was killed when he was hit by a cement mixer 18 months ago in 2017.

It’s unclear how the dog got there, as the scene of the crash is 7½ miles from his home.

Local people have tried to adopt the unnamed dog, but the faithful canine insists on staying by the roadside — through the seasons, moving only into the shade when the weather gets very hot.

So kind locals built a little kennel for the dog, and bring him food and water, as well as a memorial to his dead owner.

Dogs have been known to stay at their owner’s graves for many years.

Last year, a 15-year-old German Shepherd named Capitan died at his owner’s grave after spending 10 years at the Municipal Cemetery of Villa Carlos Paz, Argentinia. Capitan’s owner, Miguel Guzman, had died in 2006. Some months later, the dog went missing. Guzman’s family thought Capitan had run away, but were shocked to find the dog by Guzman’s graveside months later. No one knows how Capitan found the cemetery where his owner is buried.

Perhaps the best known story is that of a Skye terrier named Greyfriars Bobby in Edinburgh, Scotland. The terrier spent 14 years guarding the grave of his owner, John Gray, who died in 1858. The dog died in 1872 and is buried inside Greyfriars Kirkyard, not far from where his owner is buried. A statue was erected in the terrier’s memory and several books and three films based on his life have been produced.

See also these FOTM posts:

~Eowyn

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Chick-fil-A manager helps upset WWII vet change his flat tire

While the left hate on Chick-fil-A, their employees never cease to provide excellent customer service.

From Daily Mail: A manager of a Maryland Chick-fil-A has proved he’s willing to go above and beyond for his customers, even helping one elderly patron in the most unlikely of ways.

Daryl Howard, 29, was working at the franchise in Severn on Thursday when a regular customer by the name of Mr. Lee walked in and asked for assistance after his car sustained a flat tire.

Lee, a 96-year-old World War II veteran, visits regularly for a chicken biscuit and a coffee – but on this occasion he was in much more distress after barely making it to the restaurant.

‘He was shaking, almost in tears,’ another manager by the name of Rudy Somoza told CNN.

Howard was only too happy to help his elderly client change the tire, telling Somoza to tend to the tills while he went outside to the parking lot.

‘He jumped into action without hesitation,’ Somoza explained.

As Howard changed the car tire, Somoza snapped a picture and posted it online – with no idea that it would soon go viral.

The image – which shows Howard bending down near the vehicle as the elderly Lee watches on – has heartened social media users. ‘Let’s highlight the awesome people in society!’ one wrote on Facebook, seemingly sick of relentless bad news.

‘Chick-fil-A has some pretty awesome employees!’ cooed another admirer of the image.

Somoza says the selfless act wasn’t out of character for Howard – whom he has known for five years.

‘His act of kindness was beautiful. He has always been so helpful to anyone in need and deserves this recognition,’ Somoza stated.

Meanwhile, Mr. Lee returned to the restaurant on Friday to pick up a coffee – and to say thank you again to Howard for his help.

DCG

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Sunday Devotional: What does loving our neighbor and our enemy mean?

Luke 10:25-37

There was a scholar of the law
who stood up to test Jesus and said,
“Teacher, what must I do to inherit eternal life?”
Jesus said to him, “What is written in the law?
How do you read it?”
He said in reply,
“You shall love the Lord, your God,
with all your heart,
with all your being,
with all your strength,
and with all your mind,
and your neighbor as yourself.”

He replied to him, “You have answered correctly;
do this and you will live.”

But because he wished to justify himself, he said to Jesus,
“And who is my neighbor?
Jesus replied,
“A man fell victim to robbers
as he went down from Jerusalem to Jericho.
They stripped and beat him and went off leaving him half-dead.
A priest happened to be going down that road,
but when he saw him, he passed by on the opposite side.
Likewise a Levite came to the place,
and when he saw him, he passed by on the opposite side.
But a Samaritan traveler who came upon him
was moved with compassion at the sight.
He approached the victim,
poured oil and wine over his wounds and bandaged them.
Then he lifted him up on his own animal,
took him to an inn, and cared for him.
The next day he took out two silver coins
and gave them to the innkeeper with the instruction,
‘Take care of him.
If you spend more than what I have given you,
I shall repay you on my way back.’
Which of these three, in your opinion,
was neighbor to the robbers’ victim?”
He answered, “The one who treated him with mercy.”
Jesus said to him, “Go and do likewise.”

The above passage from Luke 10 leaves us with these questions:

  • Who are my “neighbors”?
  • What does “loving” my neighbors mean?

Alas, most priests, if not all of the priests whom I’ve heard, don’t define or explain those terms — which is puzzling because the answers are given, of course, by Christ Himself.

Note that in Luke 10, Jesus did not identify the robbers as our “neighbors”. Our “neighbor” is the man who “fell victim to robbers” who himself had done no wrong.

In Leviticus 19:17-18, it is said:

“You shall not bear hatred for your brother or sister in your heart.
Though you may have to reprove your fellow citizen,
do not incur sin because of him.
Take no revenge and cherish no grudge against any of your people.
You shall love your neighbor as yourself.”

And so, Luke 10 and Leviticus 19 give us the definitions we need:

  1. From Luke 10’s parable of the good Samaritan, we learn that:
    1. Our “neighbor” is anyone we encounter in our lives, even strangers, who find themselves in foul circumstances through no fault of their own.
    2. To “love our neighbor” means to treat those who are in need “with mercy,” that is, with kindness and compassion, and to provide assistance.
  2. But the “neighbor” in the parable of the good Samaritan was a man who fell victim to robbers through no fault of his own. What about people who find themselves in foul circumstances through their own fault? This is where “love your enemies” comes in:
    1. Our “enemies,” therefore, differ from our “neighbors” in that “enemies” are those who knowingly do wrong.
    2. That, in turn, implies that, unlike our neighbors, we are not to treat our enemies — those who knowingly do wrong — with mercy, kindness, compassion, and assistance.
  3. But we must still “love our enemies”. So how are we to love our enemies? As Leviticus 19:17-18 instructs, to love our enemies means that:
    1. We “rebuke” them: Rebuke is defined as “to criticize sharply“.
    2. We bear no hatred for them in our hearts.
    3. We do not seek revenge: Revenge is not the same as to mete out justice — revenge is defined as retaliation in kind or degree; to mete out justice is defined as “the maintenance or administration of what is just especially by the impartial adjustment of conflicting claims or the assignment of merited rewards or punishments”. (Just is defined as “morally upright or good”.) Unlike the impartial meting out of justice, “revenge” has an emotional component, which is where “hatred” comes in.
    4. We do not bear a grudge: Once justice is rendered, we let it go.
    5. We pray for them — that they repent and return to God.

Recognizing the above definitions, to “love” our “neighbors” and our “enemies” is a task that is neither simple nor easy. When we falter, just remember this:

May the peace and love of our Lord Jesus Christ be with you.

Offered in humility and love,

~Eowyn

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Animals thank humans for rescuing them

The true saying, “No good deed goes unpunished,” only applies to humans, unlike non-human creatures. FOTM readers likely each has an example to relate.

But non-human creatures, whom St. Bonaventure so insightfully and correctly called “creatures without [original] sin,” repay kindness with gratitude, as seen in the video below.

H/t Kelleigh

See also:

~Eowyn

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Guy biking across the world finds a kitten he can’t leave behind

DCG

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Coast guard pulls off harrowing rescue of dog trapped by ice and garbage

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ce_0650AfJU

Luvs a happy ending!

DCG

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Wild elks use their body heat to save boy from hypothermia

The elk (Cervus canadensis) is one of the largest species within the deer family, and one of the largest terrestrial mammals in North America.

Female elk (called cows) average 496 to 531 lb, stand 4.3 ft at the shoulder, and are 6.9 ft from nose to tail. Male elk (bulls) are 40% larger than cows at maturity, weighing an average of 705 to 730 lb, standing 4.9 ft at the shoulder and averaging 8.0 ft in length.

During the fall, elk grow a thicker coat of hair, which helps to insulate them during the winter.

Needless to say, wild elk avoid humans, especially hunters.

Rocky Mountain bull elk (Wikipedia)

The Eagles Nest Wilderness area in Colorado’s Rocky Mountain National Forest is prone to sudden, unpredictable and drastic changes in weather.

In 1992, Derek Patton and his youngest son Ryan were hunting in Eagles Nest when the two got separated.

Derek got a search and rescue party to search for the boy, but in vain.

Then it began to snow. The rescue party had to call off their search when night fell.

The boy, dressed in summer clothes, would surely die from hypothermia.

The next morning, they resumed their search.

The rescue dog found Ryan, who was on the verge of hypothermia.

The boy told an amazing story — that he had sought shelter under the low-hanging branches of a fir tree when two large elks approached. Ryan twice tried to shoo the elks away, but the elks persisted, each time getting closer to Ryan.

Finally, Ryan gave up, and the two elks lied down next to Ryan throughout the night, shielding him from the cold with their body heat.

In the morning, the elks left.

I sure hope Derek and Ryan Patton stopped hunting after this miraculous display of altruism by the two elks.

H/t JosephBC69

See these other cases of animal altruism/heroism:

~Eowyn

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