Category Archives: Education

Drunk/naked British gals in Spanish party-town outed on Facebook

From whatever available evidence there is, it appears British young women are prone to public displays of drunkenness and sluttiness.

Three months ago, I did a post, “You’ve come a long way, baby: British women at Grand National horse race,” from which FOTM harvested this pic (see below) which became the subject of one of our most popular caption contests:

Now, a Facebook page, “Maga Walk of Shame,” is chronicling the behavior and lack-of-clothing of British gals (and men too) as they walk back to their hotels and holiday apartments after a wild night out in Magaluf, a tourist resort on the Spanish island of Majorca with a sex- and alcohol -fueled “party” reputation.

Urban Dictionary defines “walk of shame” as “walking back home the day after an unplanned casual sexual encounter, typically dressed in the same clothes as the previous evening”.

Below are some pics and a video from Maga Walk of Shame“:

Jon Lockett reports for The Sun, July 26, 2017, that while the Facebook page is criticized by some for invading peoples’ privacy (one person commented: “The whole point of going to Magaluf is to have a proper wild time. You don’t need some idiot filming your every move”), those that work in the island resort defended the popular page. A 20-year-old Magaluf worker, who asked to remain anonymous, told Daily Star Online: “If you’re going to go to Magaluf, expect to be on it. It is just a bit of banter and a bit of a joke. None of the girls seem to mind and mostly just have a laugh along with it.”

Drunken tourists tearing up the Magaluf strip this summer have sparked crisis talks as local officials try to crack down on the violence and disorder. British and German diplomats were summoned for a meeting with Spanish officials to discuss how to clamp down on the excesses of young visitors. The local council issued a list of 64 banned activities, including public boozing and climbing trees and buildings, with fines of up to £2,600 ($3,392) for violations.

More disturbing than the public drunkenness and nudity/semi-nudity is a video on “Maga Walk of Shame” of a satanic parade down Magaluf’s main street in May 2017. Coral Liggins, who was at the parade, wrote this comment:

demon day 😫 still get nightmares now

Here are some screenshots from the video, showing men carrying flaming torches and wearing animals heads, demon masks and devil horns, and a giant effigy of a winged demon:

The demon parade is Magaluf’s version of correfoc, a traditional Catalan “fire and devil” street festival because, you know, paying homage to the Devil is just so much fun. /sarc

~Eowyn

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Feminists are insufferable: Pippi Longstocking books charged with racism

pippi longstocking

Prof. Wollard not a fan of the red-headed girl

From The Guardian: Astrid Lindgren’s much-loved books about Pippi Longstocking, she of the red hair, incredible strength and impossible lies, have been described as racist by a German theologian.

Dr. Eske Wollrad, a feminist theologian from Germany’s Federal Association of Evangelical Women, has claimed that Lindgren’s classic children’s novels “have colonial racist stereotypes”. In Pippi in the South Seas, “the black children throw themselves into the sand in front of the white children in the book,” she told German paper the Local. “When reading the book to my nephew, who is black, I simply left that passage out.”

Wollrad neglected to mention that Pippi goes on to mock white children for their obsession with school. “If you come across a white child crying you can be pretty sure that the school has either gone up in flames, or that a half-term holiday has broken out, or that the teacher has forgotten to set homework for the children in pluttification,” she says.

The Pippi Longstocking books were written by Lindgren in the 1940s, covering the adventures of Pippi, an inveterate liar and eccentric whose parents are dead and who shares her house with a monkey and a horse who lives on the porch.

“It is not that the figure of Pippi Longstocking is racist, but that all three in the trilogy of books have colonial racist stereotypes,” said Wollrad. “I would certainly not condemn the book completely – on the contrary, there are many very positive aspects to the book, as well as being very funny, it is instructive for children as it not only has a strong female character, she is against adultism, grown-ups being in charge, and she is fiercely opposed to violence against animals – there is a very strong critique of authority in the book,” she told the Local.

But Wollrad believes footnotes should be added to the text to help put racist terms in context and to prompt discussions. “The question to ask yourself is whether you could read a certain passage out loud to a black child without stopping or stumbling,” she said. “Only then can you say whether it is OK or not.”

Astrid Lindgren’s daughter Karin Nyman emphatically rejected the charge. She told the Guardian: “She is not a racist. She is the opposite. She is not only ‘against adultism, grown-ups being in charge, and fiercely opposed to violence against animals’ she certainly is also against racism. The passage quoted by Eske Wollrad, where the ‘black children throw themselves into the sand’ in front of Pippi and Tommy and Annika, is explicitly preceded by the explanation that they did so thinking,’for some incomprehensible reason’, that white skin was to be revered. This passage is, of course, referring to ‘colonial racist stereotypes’, but since it is immediately questioned by Pippi, who refuses to be knelt in front of, who makes a very strong point of the children being all alike, black and white, and enjoying the same games in the two books dealing with the South Seas, it is difficult to see the books as representatives of a dubious racist conception and thus harming reading children of to-day. But, of course, the old harm of colonial racism itself remains!”

Pippi is not the first classic children’s character to be hit with similar accusations. Earlier this year, a French academic said the Smurfs were antisemitic, racist and communist. Antoine Buéno, a lecturer at Sciences Po university in Paris, pointed out that the little blue creatures live in a world where private initiative is rarely rewarded, where meals are eaten communally and where there is one leader. “Does that not remind you of anything? A political dictatorship, for example?” he asked.

DCG

Know the rules: A white professor can’t be Chinese because of “privilege”

daniel bell

Professor Daniel Bell: Ain’t no Rachel Dolezal…

A man can be a woman and a white woman can be black. Yet a white man can’t be Chinese. I can’t keep up with all the science-defying liberal rules anymore.

From Yahoo: A white scholar’s recent op-ed suggests he might need some lessons on his own privilege. 

Daniel Bell, a white dean at China’s Shandong University, recently penned a piece in the Wall Street Journal entitled “Why Anyone Can Be Chinese.” In it, he laments how he’s not considered Chinese despite his self-proclaimed dedication to the culture.

China, he argues, should look at identity as cultural rather than racial, concluding the piece with his ultimate hope:

“President Xi Jinping describes his broad agenda for the country as the ‘China dream,’” Bell writes. “My own China dream is more modest: to be viewed as a Chinese not just in my own mind but in the minds of my fellow Chinese.”

Bell claims to have respect for the Chinese. But his piece shows that he’s not looking at identity through the lens of the Chinese. John Kuo Wei Tchen, associate professor and director of Asian/Pacific/American Institute, NYU notes: Bell begins his piece, making comparisons between himself and a Chinese-American who “doesn’t speak Chinese or identify in any way with Chinese culture,” and “forcefully rejects” the label “Chinese.”

But the connections Bell makes are apples to oranges. Bell, a white man from Canada, ignores the real, human experiences that Chinese people live through, Tchen noted.

Bell isn’t someone whose family has been brought up in China through generations, communicating through insider references. His ancestors haven’t lived through events like the Opium Wars or the Cultural Revolution that have shaped the population’s outlook. Bell is a white man whose roots and values come from elsewhere. 

There’s another issue at hand with Bell’s comparison. Ideas of belonging and identity are tied to political environment, Tchen says. These concepts are forged out of history and traditions, constructed over time by cultural and political forces. A western view of these ideas will be different from, say, a Chinese one. Bell doesn’t seem to acknowledge that, though.

“Notions of citizenship and belonging come out of particular political cultures. Just because that’s what he believes in, he wants to apply that to China which doesn’t really make any sense,” Tchen said. “It can’t just be willy-nilly applied to any other place.”

Bell continues his argument, listing several traits of his that he believes somehow underscore his “Chineseness.” Though he brings up possible barriers to acceptance like citizenship, commitment to culture, and lack of language skills, he insists those aren’t problems for him. He points out how he’s often “the only person wearing Chinese-style clothing” at conferences. And earlier in the piece he mentions his marriage to a Chinese woman as if those details help assert Chineseness.

In another line, he even puts down native Chinese people and pretentiously writes, “millions of poorly educated Chinese citizens speak hardly any Mandarin, and yet nobody questions their Chineseness.”

However, identity isn’t so simple as checking traits off a list, Tchen said. Bell’s possession of such qualities does not make him more “eligible” to be Chinese.

To be Chinese is not a mere checklist, just like being black or from any other culture isn’t about hitting a set number of achievements.

“If he were to become an expert on Toni Morrison, if he were to then master African-American cuisine, if he had married an African-American woman, would he feel he can claim being African-American or black?” Tchen questioned.

At one point, Bell attempts to point out the flaws in seeing Chineseness as racial and describes the country’s tumultuous relationship with foreigners.

“When China is powerful and secure, foreigners are welcome and considered employable, including at the highest levels of government,” he wrote in the op-ed. “When China is weak, foreigners are often viewed with suspicion and even hatred.”

Tchen told HuffPost that he agrees that ideally, we “need to reject the very notion of ‘race’ and hence racial belonging.” These ideas don’t translate across historical and cultural differences, he says. But again, being part of a culture is dependent on historical context. Identity goes further than today’s politics and culture.

At the end of the day, Bell’s piece begs the question posed by Tchen. “Are there not deeper shared values that are more important to explore than a European Canadian wanting to be accepted as ‘Chinese?’”

DCG

Alyssa Milano is fighting to hold Trump accountable for Russia “Collusion”

alyssa milano

Alyssa Milano (r) campaigning for loser Jon Ossoff

Well, it’s not like she is an in-demand actress. Might as well have a graduate of the “independent co-educational institution” (Buckley High School) educate y’all on the concept of “collusion.”

From Daily Beast: If you happened to be strolling the streets of northern Atlanta on March 28, you could have scored a ride from Alyssa Milano.

The star of Who’s the Boss? and Charmed took a break from filming a new CW pilot to drive people to the polls in support of Jon Ossoff, a fresh-faced Democrat hoping to flip Georgia’s 6th congressional district (He LOST). Milano was arguably the most vocal celebrity supporter of the 30-year-old political neophyte, donating her time, money, and 3.1 million strong Twitter account to the cause.

When Ossoff not-so-narrowly lost the special election to Republican Karen Handel, the actress fired off an innocuous tweet—one that, two days later, drew a creepy reply from Senator Ted Cruz (R-Texas), winking face emoji and all.

“My initial reaction was that I had to check the account four times to make sure it wasn’t a parody account. I was like, ‘This is really coming from Ted Cruz?!’” recalls Milano. “I think what he was doing was actually giving me a dig, right? I think it was a dig…but it didn’t surprise anyone coming from Ted Cruz.”

The Bensonhurst native swiftly put the Campbell’s Chunky Soup-loving lawmaker in his place.

Yes, when it comes to ‘80s TV icons the right may have Chachi but the left has Milano, who’s been gracing our television screens since she was 11 (her new series, Wet Hot American Summer: Ten Years Later, premieres on Netflix August 4). And in the wake of her Ossoff campaigning, she’s decided to launch a website—along with actor Misha Collins—that “allows you to contact your representative, via phone, email or video, and demand they take action now” and “hold the Trump administration accountable for collusion with Russia.” Its slogan—or hashtag—is #patriotnotpartisan.

“It’s very easy to sit behind our computers and bitch about the administration, but in everything I do I want to empower people to make a difference and know in themselves that they can make a difference,” Milano tells me.

“And this concept of ‘collusion’ and Russia is a very obscure concept for people to really grasp, so I hope this campaign puts into words what’s really going on in a simple way so that other people can grasp the concepts,” she continues. “In particular, this idea of ‘patriot not partisan’ is very near and dear to my heart because I feel like the far-right has hijacked the word ‘patriot,’ and it upsets me. I’m not any less of a patriot because my ideas are different.”

Milano, who is 44, created the website in response to all of the curious connections between the Trump camp and Russia—ones that are currently being investigated by the Department of Justice under special counsel Robert Mueller.

Read the rest of the story here and become educated!

h/t Twitchy

DCG

Teenage cheerleader accused of killing newborn baby and burying it in garden

brooke skylar richardson

Brooke Skylar Richardson: Good girl who “helped” children

From her attorney: “She’s by all means a very good person.”

From Yahoo: An 18-year-old Ohio cheerleader was charged after the remains of her newborn baby were discovered buried in her backyard, according to reports.

Brooke Skylar Richardson was charged with reckless homicide on Friday after evidence showed the child “was not a stillborn baby,” according to Warren County Prosecutor David Fornshell said.

The baby’s remains were found earlier this month and they appeared to be buried more than two months before their discovery, according Lieutenant John Faine of the Warren’s County Sheriff’s Office.

The baby’s remains were reportedly discovered because of a tip from a doctor’s office.

“Law enforcement is continuing to treat this as an ongoing investigation,” Fornshell told Dayton Daily News.

The prosecutor’s office is still waiting on the coroner to determine the baby’s official cause of death, NYDailyNews reported.

Richardson pleaded not guilty to the charges on Friday. 

Her attorney, Charles Rittgers, told reporters on Friday that Richardson is a “good student” who graduated high school a few months ago.

“She didn’t drink. She wasn’t a partier or smoker,” Rittgers said. “By all measures, a very good girl who helped children… She’s by all means a very good person.”

Richardson was bonded out of the Warren County Jail. Her preliminary hearing date was set for Aug. 1.

DCG

In Chicago, women worried about violence join gun club

smith & wesson

Another devastating weekend in Chiraq with a large amount of shootings. Women living there are doing something to protect themselves. Shannon Watts hardest hit.

From France 24: Her hands slowed by rheumatoid arthritis, 71-year-old Marietta Crowder stands in front of her paper target, steadies her gun and pulls the trigger. Shots are fired in quick succession.

Crowder is perhaps not the typical patron of a gun club. But she is one of seven women learning to safely handle firearms at a shooting range in a suburb of Chicago, a city wracked by gun violence and a soaring murder rate.

“My husband influenced me and we thought about it a long time. Maybe you need a gun these days, in your house at least,” said Crowder, who lives in a gated community with her retired banker husband.

A fellow retiree, Javondlynn Dunagan, came up with the idea of gun training classes geared toward women, and for the “Ladies of Steel” gun club — after successful training, the women gather twice a month to practice their skills.

Dunagan served as a parole officer for 25 years before finishing her career in January, but had rarely held a gun when dealing with convicts.  She said she started carrying one after divorcing her police officer husband.  “I was at home by myself with my daughter, and I was used to having a firearm in a home with my ex-husband,” she explained. “So, I wanted to make sure that we were safe.”

But Dunagan noticed something curious when she visited gun ranges around Chicago to practice.  “I noticed that I never saw two women at the range together or a group of ladies,” she recounted.

Dunagan was particularly struck by the lack of African-American women like herself interested in learning how to use firearms.  “I started asking friends and they said, ‘Yeah, I’m scared of guns.'”

That answer prompted her to start JMD Defense & Investigations, offering gun training programs geared towards women. The “investigations” side of the business will debut next year.

Dunagan also offers classes such as the “Mommy & Me Self-Defense Class,” where women can bring their daughters, ages 8-18 years, to learn hand-to-hand combat. “That came about because my daughter was going to college four years ago and she couldn’t find a self-defense class on the south side of Chicago,” Dunagan said.

Her clients are from the predominantly African-American communities in Chicago’s south side, in or near neighborhoods struggling with runaway gun violence.

Chicago does not have the worst crime rate in the nation, but owing to its large population — it’s the third-biggest US city — it has seen a staggering number of killings and shootings. By mid-July, there had been 1,557 shootings and 369 people murdered so far this year, according to the Chicago Police Department.

Gangs and the drug trade are behind most of the shootings, and they are indiscriminate.

Just this week, a 78-year-old man was wounded in one shooting, and a six-year-old girl and her four-year-old brother were wounded in another. All survived.  “Things happen in the neighborhoods all the time,” said Shandrea Boyd, a 40-year-old physical therapist wearing a “Black Girls Rock” t-shirt.

Boyd said she wished she did not feel the need to carry a gun, but there were too many others who were armed, she said. “You see people shooting on expressways. You see people shooting everywhere. You just never know. So you’d better be prepared (rather) than unprepared,” she said.

Boyd planned to buy a gun with enough safety features that she would feel comfortable having it at home with her four-year-old child.

That will likely be an expensive proposition. Purchasing a gun can cost several hundred to thousands of dollars. A concealed gun permit in the state of Illinois costs another $150.

The process is not for those without means. But, for students like Rhonda Gary, the cost is worth it.  “I get up before daylight and I live alone,” said the 51-year-old railroad worker. “I’ve been broken into before.”

Gary was also joining Dunagan’s gun club to get regular practice shooting with other women. “I think it will be a little bit of comfort,” she said. “A feeling of security.”

h/t Drudge

DCG

When it comes to political correctness, Millennials have the solution…

safe spaces

Like I’m going to take advice from those who love socialism yet can’t define it. Riiiiight.

From Yahoo (via Business Insider): The heated debate about political correctness is often misunderstood.

While many individuals across generations dislike the pejorative use of political correctness to represent censorship, a closer investigation reveals generational differences in the desire to use inclusive language.

Millennials know that using appropriate language invites rather than restricts productive conversation. Creating a supportive environment makes space for all individuals to feel welcome in sharing their opinions, rather than fearing that people will demonize their personhood and attack their character based on their identities. Thanks to the internet, Millennials are citizens of the globe and ambassadors of social justice. Unfortunately, not all generations understand how using certain words or phrases prohibits dialogue and hurts other people.

To discover five things that all millennials want older generations to know about political correctness that they don’t understand, read the list below.

  1. There is a major difference between ‘being honest’ and spewing prejudice.

You have the right to share your opinion, but you don’t have the right to make people feel threatened. Using emotionally charged words that make others feel frightened for their mental, physical, and emotional wellbeing — even if it does not impact you in the same way — is morally wrong.

Prejudice means possessing strong unfavorable opinions about a person based on their demographics and cultural affiliations. While we all have varying degrees of prejudice, using yours to purposefully harm others, or refusing to stop saying words that others find hurtful, is bullying. Just as you want a teacher to intervene and protect your child from a bully, it’s okay for others to give you the opportunity to correct your behavior when your words are offensive.

  1. Political correctness is not about censorship, it’s about showing respect.

Censorship is a coercive attempt to hide something from people. Asking people to use more inclusive language is not silencing their voice, it’s inviting them to use language in a way that promotes productive conversation.

The purpose of political correctness is to treat all people with the love and respect they deserve. This means calling people by the pronouns they use, and avoiding words and phrases that stereotype and demonize entire groups of people. You can still possess whatever ideology you follow and you can still share your opinion, you’re just being asked to do so in a way that is not hurtful to others.

  1. Millennials feel more connected to global citizenship and human rights than nationalism.

Not only do Millennials have conversations with people around the world, they are also seeing inhumane acts of violence against marginalized people live streamed on social media. This increased visibility and exposure leads to a desire to ensure equality for all individuals, regardless of their race, gender, sexuality, socioeconomic status, or religion.

Nationalism, or the belief that your country and its laws, culture, and government is superior and beyond critique, is not appealing to Millennials. Seeing firsthand pictures and videos on their smartphones of discrimination and unequal rights for people of color, Muslims, immigrants, women, and LGBTQ individuals has increased Millennials desire for social justice.

  1. Inclusive language creates space for meaningful conversations to take place, offensive language makes people feel unsafe.

If you were trying to have a difficult conversation with someone and they opened the discussion using words that were aimed at hurting your feelings, making you feel unsafe, or undermining your personhood, would you want to keep talking?

No, and that’s why everyone should use more inclusive language. When you create space for other people instead of shutting them out, it creates opportunities for honest dialogue to emerge. You’re not being ask [sic] to silence yourself, you’re being asked to use different words and phrases to express your thoughts. That subtle difference is not a big deal — you do it all the time. You don’t speak the same way to your partner as you do your grandmother or your newborn infant. Adjusting your dialogue isn’t a momentous task, and doing so might allow you to have more meaningful conversations with people from all walks of life.

  1. Millennials are not being sensitive, they’re being morally minded and ethically informed global citizens.

Many individuals in older generations think that Millennials are overly sensitive, but it may be the other way around. If Millennials are simply asking older generations to be respectful of others by using more inclusive language, and older generations respond with hostility — a common response to feeling threatened — perhaps older generations are dealing with an underlying fear of being unable to adapt to a changing world.

Making mistakes is part of learning. Most people occasionally say things that hurt other people’s feelings. But the mature individuals are the ones that apologize and then adjust. Continuing to use hurtful language only prevents meaningful and necessary conversations.

DCG