Category Archives: Education

Saturday funny: Colorado demorat candidate douses his eyes w/pepper spray to push for gun control

This is the type of people Obama had working for him.

About this fool, from Wikipedia:

“Levi Mills Tillemann-Dick is an American businessman, academic, and author. Currently managing partner at Valence Strategic, LLC and a fellow at the New America Foundation, he is also the author of the 2015 book, The Great Race: The Global Quest For The Car Of The Future (Simon and Schuster). Levi was also the lead author of the report Revolution Now, which he published while working in President Barack Obama‘s Department of Energy. After forming an exploratory committee in May 2017 to examine the feasibility of a congressional bid in Colorado’s 6th congressional district, Levi officially announced his candidacy in late June.”

Levi calls himself unapologetically progressive. To cure  gun violence, he wants to ban assault weapons, get “warfare” ammo off the street, address “toxic masculinity” and end global arms trade.

Ya got me Levi with this little stunt.  I’m surrendering all my firearms now after seeing that!

NOT.

h/t Twitchy

DCG

Vogue magazine asks, “Should we still let children play with toy guns?”

It’s the “Classic Mother BB Gun Block.”

Pro-tip for the women cited in this article: We have THOUSANDS of strict gun laws already on the books. The problem is enforcement and those darn criminals who don’t obey them.

And if you’re interested in teaching your child about proper firearm safety instead of an irrational fear, there are LOTS of resources available. For example, see here, here, here, here, here and here.

From Yahoo (originally from Vogue): Over the weekend, on a party supplies run at Flying Tiger, the charming Danish discount store, my 4-year-old daughter’s eyes sparkled at the sight of a neon-color water gun. “Can I have that?” she asked—the same question she’d repeated at the sight of the modeling clay and princess crowns and silly straws.

I wavered for a beat. I’d come of age in the late ’80s and ’90s—the height of the backyard Super Soaker battle. And before that water gun became the hottest ticket at Toys “R” Us, my brother and I had wielded tiny green plastic water pistols filled and refilled with rudimentary plugs, sneakily shooting each other in the eyes. I remember all of this as pure, absurd fun.

“No,” I told my daughter, and briskly steered her on.

I offered no explanation in the moment—and I hadn’t really turned the question over in my head before—but my gut gave me my answer: that I didn’t want to introduce her to this or any other gun in a world that already seemed to be teeming with them in movies and video games, on TV and, most of all, on the news. Her fleeting interest in the toy gun was innocent, but, sadly, my view of it no longer was.

The water gun fights my brother and I used to have in the summer were from another era, maybe even another world—before Columbine and Parkland; Orlando and Sutherland Springs; and before these much-covered mass shootings rightfully reminded the public of the regularly occurring violence in lower socioeconomic and minority communities.

Back then, guns might have been just toys; now, it’s impossible for me not to see them as charged with the trauma of recent events.

I considered that same question again today—should we let our children play with toy guns at a time when the U.S. is grappling with the impact of gun violence?—when I saw the pictures of Prince George holding a rather realistic-looking black toy gun at an English polo match over the weekend. Part of the debate over toy guns has hinged on distinguishing them, clearly, as toys—so as never to be mistaken for the real thing. There are state laws, including one in New York, requiring toy guns be brightly colored, as opposed to black, aluminum, or silver. Perhaps for this reason, the photos stood out: to some eyes, the prince’s looked eerily like a real pistol.

“I gasped when I saw the photos,” an American friend said on Facebook.

And she has a reason to: America has a gun violence homicide rate that is 25 times higher than that of other developed countries, according to Everytown for Gun Safety; we outrank all other countries in the number of mass shootings that occur here; we own an estimated half of all civilian guns worldwide. A child wielding a toy gun in the U.K., where firearms are much harder to obtain, arouses a different sense of shock or unease than they might in America, though no less alarming—remember the brouhaha when Pippa Middleton’s friend pointed a firearm out of their convertible at a paparazzi?

There’s also the matter of who’s holding the toy gun. “The photo of Prince George juxtaposed with the story of Tamir Rice, a young black boy killed by police in Ohio because he had a toy gun in hand is an important part of the racial and white supremacy dynamics at play here,” Erika Soto Lamb, the founding and former head of communications for Everytown and Moms Demand Action for Gun Safety and a mother of two sons, ages 5 and 7, told Vogue. “It’s not safe for a black child in America to play with toy guns.”

Soto Lamb is a Texas native who was raised around real guns; she grew up playing cops and robbers and revering A Christmas Story—the irreverent classic in which mischievous young Ralphie Parker dreams of his very own BB gun. But she does not allow her two sons to play with toy guns of any kind. While at Everytown and Moms Demand Action, “when my life was a daily deluge of news stories about gun violence in America, and working with mothers whose children had been killed, it was simply untenable to come home and hand my children guns to play with,” Soto Lamb said.

When I began asking other parents today about kids and toy guns, many echoed her uneasiness. “My daughter is just 3, but I don’t think a gun can be an innocent toy in this day and age,” Anna Davies, a fellow writer in Jersey City, New Jersey, told me. “It’s much easier to just not have them in our lives.”

Another friend said she was “uncomfortable” when her 5-year-old daughter recently received a toy water gun in a birthday party goodie bag. One mother stealthily returned a “machine-gun” toy loaded with foam pellets that her son received at his own birthday party. “It was designed to look like the real deal,” she said. “I was so horrified, I immediately stashed it away while he was busy tearing into his other gifts.”

I can hear the other side now: that parents denying their kids toy guns are overthinking this. That a toy is still just a toy. But if Barbies arguably possess the power to body shame little girls, and princesses can mess with their sense of independence, then can’t guns, even if just subliminally, sanction violence? “I believe we have a cultural problem with guns in this country, and I don’t want to normalize the use of them,” Kathy Healy Champion, a mother of three in Connecticut, said. She doesn’t allow her children to play with toy guns. “I see it as a step in the right direction.”

After Sandy Hook, Soto Lamb says she began to view A Christmas Story through a different lens: “I realized that America’s problem with gun violence goes deeper than any laws, there is a cultural shift that needs to happen,” she said. “We give them blocks to inspire them to be builders, we give them paint to inspire artistic expression . . . what are we feeding our children, in the metaphorical sense, when we hand them toy guys to play with?

It doesn’t have to be a real gun to spark debate: According to Apple, Google, Facebook, Microsoft, and Twitter, even emoji guns carry a certain charge that doesn’t necessarily belong in our texts or tweets: all of those companies scrapped their original gun emojis in favor of “water guns.” The TSA—Transportation Security Administration—recommends toy guns be packed with checked baggage; it bans “squirt guns, Nerf guns, toy swords, or other items that resemble realistic firearms or weapons.”

For some parents, the question of how to handle toy guns is ongoing—some allow just water guns and only of the bright-colored variety. Others have nuanced rules—that toy guns should never be pointed at people or used to pretend-kill someone. (But, then again, that’s usually the point of a gun, whether real or fake.) Some parents say the decision isn’t easy—one mother reluctantly allows her sons to partake in paintball gunning, so as not to make them feel left out among friends. The hardest part for Soto Lamb is banning water guns. “Water guns are really so fun, but let’s be honest, Super Soakers are basically assault weapon–style water guns,” she said. “We make do with water blasters”—long tubes with no trigger—“and water balloons.”

Several parents told me their concerns about toy guns tend to get dwarfed by their worry over real gun violence. Responding to some online backlash about Prince George’s toy gun, Davies said, “I wish the outrage would continue to be directed at the NRA, not Prince George and the royal family. Maybe if we lived in a society that had strict gun laws, our toddlers could also play with pretend guns. I think it’s actually something to aspire to—let’s become a society where guns are just as fantastical as lightsabers.”

DCG

California university’s website says its OK for children to engage in ‘sexual play,’ watch porn

serious

But don’t you dare hand them a toy gun!

From Fox News: A public university in California features a controversial website that encourages parents to react “positively” when 4-year-olds touch each other’s genitals and says young children should be allowed to watch porn.

The University of California, Santa Barbara hosts an online platform, within the sociology department, called “SexInfo Online,” which is maintained by students “who have studied advanced topics in human sexuality” that seek to answer a myriad of questions on sexuality, The College Fix reported.

“The majority of sexual play between children takes place between the ages of 4 and 7,” the website states in a section titled “Childhood Sexuality,” accompanied by a photo of two little girls that appear to be kissing on a beach. “Children might display affection to their friends by hugging and kissing, or touching each other’s genitals, which is perfectly normal. Parents should not react in a negative way because children are just exploring.

It adds that parents should intervene only “if the acts are non-consensual or hurtful.”

In a section titled “Talking To Your Children About Sexparents are encouraged to let their children watch pornography.

“It is important that children understand that viewing pornography is a normal habit, and that they do not need to be ashamed of it,” UCSB students wrote.

(It goes on: “However, parents should discuss with their child that pornography may create certain expectations about sex that are unrealistic, especially when it comes to the appearance, desires, and behavior of women. Emotional intimacy, although severely lacking in most x-rated productions, is a huge part of sex. Finally, parents should remind their child that although sexuality may be a new part of their life which worth exploring, they should resist getting carried away. Children should activities like excessive masturbation, and they should continue to cultivate other productive activities, such as sports, clubs, and friendships.)

The article tells parents how to have “the talk” with their kids.

“Children and teens do not want to be told what to do, especially when it comes to personal topics such as sex,” the website states. “It is important that parents do not lecture their children, but instead try to present information and have an open discussion about sex. Adolescents will make their own decisions regarding sex and it is up to the parent to give them the information and resources needed to make informed decisions.

The school’s department of sociology chair declined to comment and the university did not immediately respond to request for comment.

DCG

“Communism will win” officer receives Other Than Honorable discharge

Spenser Rapone

Good riddance.

Read about his discharge here.

About the Other Than Honorable (OTH) discharge, from Wikipedia:

“An OTH is a form of administrative discharge. This type of discharge represents a departure from the conduct and performance expected of all military members.

Recipients of OTH discharges are barred from reenlisting into any component of the Armed Forces including the Reserve and National Guard components.

Generally, in order to receive VA benefits and services, the Veteran’s character of discharge or service must be under “other than dishonorable” conditions (e.g., honorable, under honorable conditions, general) as stated by VA policy. However, individuals receiving another-than-honorable or bad conduct discharge may qualify for VA benefits depending on a “Character of Service Determination (CSD)” made by VA.

If the veteran has either a service-connected injury or illness, at least two years of active-duty service, or has received at least one Honorable discharge they will be able to enroll in the VA health care system. The VA will submit Form 7131 (Information Exchange Between VA Regional Offices and Medical Facilities) and make a character of service determination to decide if their service was “Honorable (for VA purposes)”, “Honorable (for medical purposes)”, or “Dishonorable”.

Veterans with an OTH discharge who qualify for VA Healthcare are eligible to submit claims for disability compensation pay, participation in educational, volunteer, and vocational rehabilitation programs. Other Than Honorable recipients are eligible for Montgomery GI Bill benefits if they have completed at least one honorable discharge and may be eligible for Post 9/11 GI Bill Benefits if the VA determines their service to be “Honorable (for VA purposes)”.

At least this guy won’t be allowed a platform in the military any more.

See also:

DCG

The Die-In Caption Contest

This is the 178th world-famous FOTM Caption Contest!

Here’s the pic:

About the pic: A “die-in” in a grocery store on June 12, 2018, National Die-in Day, to protest against the NRA and advocate gun control in honor of the “hundreds of countless lives lost to gun violence in this country each year.”

You know the drill:

  • Enter the contest by submitting your caption as a comment on this thread (scroll down until you see the “LEAVE A REPLY” box), not via email or on Facebook.
  • The winner of the Caption Contest will get a gorgeous Award Certificate of Excellence and a year’s free subscription to FOTM! :D
  • FOTM writers will vote for the winner.
  • Any captions proffered by FOTM writers, no matter how brilliant (ha ha), will not be considered. :(

This contest will be closed in a week, at the end of next Tuesday, June 19, 2018.

To get the contest going, here’s my caption:

What if they staged a die-in and nobody cared?

For the winner of our last Caption Contest, go here.

~Eowyn

TDS: Robert De Niro and his foul mouth bash President Trump during award ceremony for high school students

Robert De Niro gave a speech at The Jimmy & Rosemary Breslin American Writer Awards in NYC on June 7. About the award event:

“On June 7th, 2018, thirteen student writers were honored as the winners of the Jimmy and Rosemary Breslin “American Writer Award” during a ceremony at Tweed.

The award is the culmination of a writing competition highlighting the journalistic voices of New York City’s young writers. The essay contest was open to all 12th-graders in NYC public schools. Each student was required to submit a non-fiction, New York-centered story in 800 words or less.”

The audience at this event was high school kids. With that in mind, De Niro couldn’t control his TDS and went off on President Trump, as it only took him 36 seconds into his speech to start his rants.

Here’s a sampling of some of what he said (I listened to the whole video so you don’t have to):

  • What does the truth mean today? If you’re Donald Trump, it doesn’t mean anything.
  • Our country is lead by a president who believes he can make up his own truth. And we have a word for that: B*llshit.
  • Trump manifests serious mental illness that renders him psychologically incapable of discharging duties of the president of the US.
  • That he (Trump) is mean-spirited, soulless, immoral, amoral, con artist son of a b*tch.
  • F*ck Donald Trump.
  • You know with Hitler, with other desperates, people didn’t take them seriously (obvious reference to comparing Trump to Hitler). They laughed at them, turned around and then it was too late. We can’t let that happen in this country.
  • He’s a f*cking idiot.
  • A government that uses the same language Lenin and Stalin used to arrest and execute Soviet citizens calling our journalists enemy of the people.

De Niro continued his vulgarities against President Trump at the Tony Awards Sunday night. He said, “Fck Trump, it’s not longer down with Trump. It’s fck Trump.” The audience, of course, gave him a standing ovation.

Classy, De Niro, real classy.

If you so desire to view his rant, De Niro gets up to the podium at the 1:37 mark.

See also:

h/t Breitbart

DCG

Parkland students plan bus tour to target places where NRA “bought and paid for politicians”

emma gonzalez tweet

Be sure to vocalize your true agenda while on the road, kids…

There were record gun sales in April, the second month in a row.

The NRA has reached 6,000,000 members.

The NRA had record attendance at their annual convention in Dallas last month.

The NRA broke a 15-year fundraising record in April.

Donations to the NRA PAC tripled after the #GunControlNow crowd started targeting the NRA.

But hey, you kids keep doing your anti-Second Amendment thing. Hope to see you soon in Oklahoma!

From USA Today: A group of students-turned-activists from Florida’s Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School will be hitting the road next week on a nationwide bus tour aimed at educating voters — and encouraging them to actually vote to end gun violence.

“We’re going to places where the NRA has bought and paid for politicians who refuse to take simple steps to save our lives,” the March for Our Lives leaders said in a statement. The group will visit communities affected by gun violence “to meet fellow survivors and use our voices to amplify theirs.”

The March for Our Lives Road to Change will launch June 12 in Illinois, where the group will join the Peace March led by students from Chicago’s St. Sabina Academy. Cameron Kasky, one of the Florida group’s leaders, said Monday the two-month tour will make at least 75 stops in more than 20 states.

A separate tour will make stops in each of Florida’s 27 congressional districts.

“We can fix the political system,” Kasky said. “Our generation and the many generations that are helping us can change the game.”

The March for Our Lives drew millions of people to rallies across the nation and around the world demanding responsible gun laws. Its leaders included Kasky and several other Stoneman Douglas students who rose to national prominence in the days after a Valentine’s Day shooting rampage at the school killed 17 students and staff.

The last midterm elections, in 2014, drew the lowest turnout since World War II, Kasky said. He noted that 4 million teens will turn 18 this year.

“We are encouraging people around the country to educate themselves on their vote, to get out there and turn voting into more of an act of patriotism than a chore,” Kasky said.

The announcement came one day after graduation ceremonies honored the senior class, including four members slain in the attack — Nicholas Dworet, Joaquin Oliver, Meadow Pollack and Carmen Schentrup. Surprise commencement speaker Jimmy Fallon urged graduates to move forward and “don’t let anything stop you.”

DCG