Category Archives: Education

David Horowitz Brilliantly Exposes Muslim Student’s True Intentions – UC San Diego

This student provides the perfect representation of Muslim perspectives.

From the UC San Diego Muslim Student Association (MSA) web page:

“MSA at UCSD was formed when students of Muslim culture and heritage formed the group to meet the specific needs of the underrepresented Muslim students, staff, and faculty, studying, working, and teaching at UCSD. Years later, under a much changed structure and membership, MSA at UCSD still serves the Muslim community with the same goals of minimizing under-representation and misrepresentation of our community

Recognizing that Muslims and those living in predominantly Muslim countries share a common heritage, MSA at UCSD strives to serve and represent these persons at the UCSD campus through educational, cultural, and social programs and activities. MSA at UCSD provides a social and cultural outlet for members of the Muslim community. Furthermore, recognizing that Muslims and their history, culture, and institutions are often misrepresented or dehumanized by orientalism and mainstream media sources, MSA at UCSD strives to increase the representation of Muslim perspectives at all levels of society, specifically at the university and stresses the fair and objective study of Islam through its programs and activities.”

h/t Weasel Zippers

DCG

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Wisconsin students demand free tuition for black students to fight white supremacy

all-white-people-are-racist-hoodie

What do you expect from a university that wouldn’t denounce one of their student’s selling the above “All White People Are Racist” hoodies?

From Yahoo: (MADISON, Wis.: AP) — Black students should be offered free tuition and housing at the University of Wisconsin-Madison because blacks were legally barred from education during slavery and university remains out of reach for black students today, the student government said Wednesday.

The Associated Students of Madison said in a resolution that students from suburban high schools are overrepresented. The group said consideration of ACT and SAT scores in applications restricts opportunities for the poor and thus upholds “white supremacy.”

Race relations have been a contentious issue at the Wisconsin’s flagship campus for months. The university has proposed some measures aimed at improving diversity.

“The university’s rhetoric suggests that it is committed to diversity and inclusion, so this legislation compels the university to move towards action — which is imperative,” the resolution’s author, ASM Student Council Rep. Tyriek Mack, said in a statement. “If no one challenges the university’s empty promises, then the racial composition will remain stagnant.”

The resolution demands free access to the university for all black people, including former inmates. That means free tuition, free housing and no fees, Mack said. That would save a black resident undergraduate student about $20,000 a year.

The resolution goes on to call for the university to use 10 percent of donations to bolster financial aid and study the feasibility of test-optional and geographically weighted admissions.

The language mirrors demands that the Black Liberation Collective, a national network of black youth focused on higher education, has made to nearly 90 campuses across the country.

Black students currently make up about 2 percent of Madison enrollment. University spokeswoman Meredith McGlone noted the proportion of “students of color” has grown from 11 percent to 15 percent over the last decade. She said the school supports the spirit of the resolution but that it’s unclear whether the methods it proposes are legal or the best way to accomplish those goals.

Chancellor Rebecca Blank has proposed giving first-generation transfers from two-year schools free tuition for a year, contingent on funding in the upcoming state budget, and a recent $10 million donation will be invested in expanding the Chancellor’s Scholarship Program, which supports minorities, McGlone said.

ACT and SAT scores are not the only factor in admissions to the university in Madison, but their inclusion is required under regent policy, McGlone said.

Last spring, pictures of swastikas and Adolf Hitler were posted on a Jewish student’s door, someone hurled racial slurs and spat at a black student in a dorm, and police arrested a black student during class for spray-painting anti-racist messages on campus buildings. Minority students spent the semester pressuring administrators for change.

Last month, a student who was imprisoned for burning down two black churches tried to start a white supremacist group on campus. He abandoned his efforts following intense backlash, but the student government criticized Blank for saying he had a legal right to express his views.

The university in August proposed building a black cultural center, introducing discussions about social differences and expanding ethnic studies courses and diversity training for all faculty and staff.

In-state undergraduate tuition has been frozen for four years and Gov. Scott Walker has proposed a 5 percent tuition cut for resident undergraduates in the second year of the upcoming state budget. Representatives of the Legislature’s budget-writing committee haven’t responded to an email Thursday seeking comment.

Asked for comment on the resolution, Mike Mikalsen, an aide to state Sen. Steve Nass — a Republican and one of the university’s most outspoken critics — responded by calling ASM a waste of student fees.

Madison Bevan, a sophomore from Los Angeles who identifies herself as black-white biracial, called free access for black students a good way to bolster their numbers on campus. She said one student in her dorm told her she was the first black person they’ve ever seen. “There’s such a small number of (black) people on campus, it’s very easy to feel like you’re alone,” she said.

Chinese graduate student Yuhong Zhu said the resolution is awkward and he’d rather see more scholarships than a blanket offer of free access. “I wouldn’t appreciate if the school offered me free tuition just because I’m a minority,” he said. “We should at least have to work hard for it.”

Jared Akers, a white student at the school, said the resolution was “odd” and that free access for blacks was unfair. “That,” he said, “kind of seems like a handout more than doing them any favors.”

DCG

Students at liberal arts college wear white puzzle piece pins to remind themselves of white privilege

white-puzzle-project

College Democrat Aileen Ida: Her struggle is real…

I’ll pass.

From Daily Mail: Students at a small liberal arts college in Central Pennsylvania are wearing white puzzle piece pins this month to raise awareness of white privilege and its impact on people of color.

The Elizabethtown College Democrats launched a project over the weekend called the ‘Personal Identity Campaign,’ which revolves around the question – ‘How does race affect my life, directly and indirectly.’

The organizers of the campaign, which officially kicked off on campus Saturday evening, say that wearing the white pin will serve as a reminder of the ‘struggles’ associated with racial identity.

Founded in 1899, Elizabethtown College has about 1,800 undergraduate students, of whom 86 per cent are white. The school’s 203-acre campus is stated in Lancaster County, where according to the latest US Census data from 2015, more than 90 per cent of the population is white.

Aileen Ida, president of the College Democrats who is spearheading the white pin campaign, tells Lancaster Online that the goal of the project is to get people to talk openly about race and white privilege.

According to Ida, who is Caucasian, all white people inherently benefit from white privilege, whether they like it or not, but few pause to think about the effect it has on their lives and the lives of minorities around them. Her organization is hoping to change that, one puzzle piece at a time.

‘People of color have to every day wake up and think about race,’ Ida told Local 21 CBS last week. ‘They have to think about how it affects their life, what they have to do for it to not negatively affect their life, and as a white person, we don’t usually have to think about that.’

Ida’s group tweeted on Tuesday that so far, 50 students, alumni and people in the community have made a pledge to wear the puzzle pins for one month.  Ida pointed out that the purpose of the pin project is not to malign white people because of the color of their skin, but rather to encourage everyone to reflect on racial identity.

According to the college Democrats’ official Facebook page, the campaign was inspired by Barb Girod, a white Lutheran pastor from Wisconsin, who made a commitment to wear a white puzzle piece pin every day for a year ‘to force herself to think about her white privilege and the impact white privilege has on people of color.’

Not everyone, however, appears to be on board with the project. Facebook user Paul Lewis slammed the campus activists as ‘crazy leftists’ and likened the pins to Nazi-era yellow ‘Jude’ stars. ‘I love being white and am proud of my Italian-American heritage…everyone should be proud of their race and embrace it,’ he wrote in a comment on the group’s page.

Another commenter pointed out that the group has chosen the puzzle piece a symbol of white privilege, even though puzzle pieces are most commonly identified with Autism awareness.

DCG

Cal State Fullerton professor assaults Republican student

In a tweet yesterday, the College Republicans (CR) of California State University, Fullerton (CSUF), @CSUFGOP, claims that:

A man claiming to be a professor has assaulted one of our protesters. We are in contact with the police.

csuf-assault

According to the Orange County RegisterBreitbart and Campus Reform,   about 45 members of a CSUF student club, Students for Justice in Palestine, held a rally and march yesterday against President Trump’s executive order temporarily barring immigrants from seven Muslim-majority countries.

Another student group, CSUF Republicans, held a much smaller counter-protest.

Eric Canin, a part time anthropology professor, approached the College Republicans group as they were marching, and attempted to rip away the sign College Republican Jared Lopez was holding. Another College Republican, Bryce Ignalls, saw what was happening and tried to separate the professor from the student. Canin then struck Ignalls in the face.

eric-canin

Christopher Boyle, president of CSUF College Republicans, said:

“I saw a man who had told us he was a professor attacking Bryce Ingalls, and immediately intervened to physically restrain him until police arrived to apprehended him. At the time, students identified him as anthropology professor Eric Canin. A quick google search and the police report confirmed this. Eric Canin is a part time anthropology professor here at CSUF, and he took offense to our presence during the protest, and assaulted one of my College Republicans, Bryce Ingalls. It’s unfortunate that young republicans and College Republicans can’t take their safety for granted on campus and get attacked for their views. I felt shocked that this kind of violence could take place on our campus. Our job on campus is to stand up for republicans and conservatives and when I see anyone especially a professor physically attacking a student I feel like it’s my responsibility to step in and be the safeguard that republican students deserve. After he assaulted a student, I put him under a citizens arrest and I want to make sure he is going to be held accountable.”

Amanda McGuire, vice president of the CSUF College Republicans, said:

“The CRs organized a counter protest, with just signs, to multiple student organizations who created an Anti-’Muslim Ban’/Anti-Trump protest, which consisted of speakers and various activities. After some time they began to march around the campus with our group following no less than 100-200 feet behind. Along the route a professor came up and started asking questions asking if there were any professors with us (there wasn’t) [and] stating that only uneducated people would be out here counter protesting.

[Professor Eric Canin] continued to engage our group even though some of our members were over the conversation, and finally I turned and saw him lunge for a sign. Another member steps in between and he gets shoved, so he shoves back. Professor Canin managed to also push an ASI (student government) student [who was] trying to break up the scuffle.

I thought it was awful. We started the counter-protest displaying our views on immigration and students got to see other people who held different views. The professor’s actions were completely wrong and unwarranted to respond in a physically violent way to a student on the basis of simply disagreeing with his politics.”

CSUF campus police department said a report has been filed for “battery” and that one of the CR members wishes to press charges. Ali Deway, a senior at CSUF, observed that “People would already be in cuffs if this was done to the Democrats.”

Following the incident, Jeffrey D. Cook, the chief communications officer for California State University, Fullerton, declared on Twitter that “any violent incident, however isolated, cannot be tolerated and is unacceptable.” But in a later tweet on Feb. 8, CSUF College Republicans said:

“It appears that the professor that assaulted one of our members will not be penalized. We’ll keep you updated!”

Hannah Reams, a junior at CSUF, said, “Since Eric Canin is not a tenured professor, we encourage concerned citizens to call or email the school to ask for corrective action.”

Here’s contact info.:

  • Eric Canin
    Part-time faculty in cultural anthropology
    Email: ecanin@fullerton.edu
  • Mildred García, Ed.D.
    President, CSUF
    2600 Nutwood Avenue, CP-1000
    Fullerton, CA 92831
    Ph: 657-278-3456
    Email: presidentgarcia@fullerton.edu

~Eowyn

Massachusetts kids make valentines: ‘To Islam, With Love’

muslim-valentines

Useful idiots. Allah does not permit those of Islamic faith to celebrate that which belongs to Christians. Try explaining how inclusive that is to the kiddos.

From Boston Globe: Lots of kids make lots of Valentine’s Day cards this time of year, but the cards hung on a display inside the Massachusetts College of Art and Design on Sunday afternoon were different. Among the usual red and pink, hearts and doilies, glitter and paint, were messages in Arabic.

More than 150 adults and children showed up for “To Islam, With Love,” a card-making marathon at the school’s Design and Media Center.

The handmade pieces will be delivered to the Islamic Society of Boston Cultural Center in Roxbury around Valentine’s Day, along with others mailed in by people who couldn’t attend, said Tanya Nixon-Silberg, co-founder of Wee the People, which organized the event.

Twelve Boston Latin Academy students who study Arabic at the school volunteered their time at the event to help families write the Arabic script. Members of the Arabic program created a handout with “phrases of love” in Arabic as a guide, according to Katie Quackenbush, who teaches Arabic at the school.

“On a very visceral level, kids understand when someone’s not being nice to someone,” said Nixon-Silberg. “If kids can understand fairness, they can understand unfairness, which means they can understand injustice.”

Parents in the room said they felt a duty to make the local Muslim community feel wanted and included, especially given some of the heated rhetoric expressed during Donald Trump’s presidential campaign. And though the children in the room were young — most under 10 years old — their parents and caretakers wanted to get started early, teaching inclusion to the next generation.

“I don’t think they’re ever too young to teach empathy and support for others,” said Lisa Ballew, of Melrose, who brought her two young children to the event. Her 4-year-old son, Henry, said he was there to make cards for Muslims, “because some people don’t like them and we want to cheer them up.”

From attending rallies to contacting legislators to supporting local nonprofit groups, “every day, we do something” to spread inclusion and stand against Trump’s rhetoric, said Lynn Brown, of Jamaica Plain, who was at the event with her partner and her partner’s nephew Noren. That morning, she said, they had called the office of Republican Senator John McCain of Arizona.

It took a few tries, but 3-year-old Noren carefully used a clothespin to attach his card to the display. Scrawled in marker upon the red heart glued to the white doily, he explained, was a drawing of “a machine for when monkeys get hot.”

Renato Milone and his wife, Monica Cohen, smiled as their 1 1/2-year-old daughter climbed around his shoulders like a jungle gym, blue paint smeared on her face and hands. “This is beautiful,” he said. “With or without Donald Trump, this should happen every day.”

DCG

Principal at private school says Trump presidency is ‘more troubling’ than 9/11

steve-nelson-calhoun-school

Steve Nelson: A serious case of Trump Derangement Syndrome

From NY Post: The principal at a progressive Manhattan private school told parents in an email last week that the Trump presidency was more troubling than Vietnam, the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr., the September 11 attacks and Watergate, The Post has learned.

Steve Nelson’s scorching missive managed to roil several parents at the $46,000 per year Calhoun School – no small feat considering the Upper West Side bastion’s blaring liberal bent. “It was inappropriate, it was offensive, it was condescending,” said one parent. “This is a liberal school. So I guess that’s the approach. But this was too much. To compare this to 9-11 – I think that’s just too much.”

Nelson emailed a series of anguished ruminations on Donald Trump’s ascent to Calhoun parents, simultaneously calling for non-partisanship while skewering the billionaire’s policies.

In a message sent last week, Nelson, who also teaches journalism at the pre-K through 12 campus, noted his intimate familiarity with several recent catastrophes – including 9-11. “I watched soot-covered New Yorkers grimly trudging north on West End Avenue on September 11, 2001,” Nelson wrote. “I am more troubled now.”

Elsewhere in the lengthy missive, Nelson acknowledged the theoretical need to avoid political bias in a school environment. “One in my position must be scrupulous in avoiding partisanship,” he said. But he later asserted in the same message that “there are matters that transcend political diversity.”

“The ways in which equity and equality are now threatened are deeply troubling, including the constitutionally suspect and arguably discriminatory efforts to restrict or prohibit immigration based on religion and/or ethnicity,” he wrote.

Another parent told The Post Wednesday that she wasn’t a Trump zealot but was still made uncomfortable by the outward display of political allegiance. “I just think this went too far,” she said. “I understand that this is a progressive school, but at a certain point you have to have some restraint.”

Nelson, who has been at the school for two decades and plans to retire this year, staunchly stood by his actions Wednesday. “I’ve been at the school for 19 years and there was not a message that got a more positive response than this one,” he said. “If this upset a few people I understand. But you can’t make everyone happy all the time.”

“I not only stand by the statement but I wouldn’t mind it being published in full,” he said. “One aspect of a progressive school is that we’re open to dissent and dialogue about everything,” he said. “I would discuss this with the families if they chose to come in and chat with me.”

But a parent speculated that failing to denounce Trump with sufficient vigor would lead to immediate leper status in key Calhoun social circles. “Are you kidding me?” she said. “Here? You wouldn’t be able to show your face.”

Students at the West End Ave. school – which counts actor Ben Stiller and comedian Jordan Peele as graduates – eagerly backed their principal.

“You do know we go to a progressive school?” one male student, 16, told a reporter Wednesday. “They want kids informed on issues like executives orders. The day after the election we had an emergency assembly to talk about our feelings and what happened. Like in history class we talk about how the world was in the 1930s then and compare it to Trump. Similar economics and racial issues as in the 1930s.”

“My history teacher always finds a way to connect everything to Trump,” said a 15-year-old female student. “He will talk about ancient leaders destroying an empire then mentions Trump.”

“There are discussions between students, I mean we go to a pretty progressive school,” said a male student. “We are all in an agreement we don’t like Trump.”

Founded in 1896, Calhoun has an enrollment of 730 kids and prides itself on tackling thorny issues like racism head on. As part of a 2012 initiative called “Deconstructing Racism,” the school commissioned a documentary entitled “I’m Not Racist…Am I?”

A Calhoun parent said she was surprised by the objections to Nelson’s approach. “You know what you’re getting here,” she said. “And we’re proud of that.”

DCG

Student senators under fire for bill abolishing safe spaces

safe-space

From Campus Reform: Student senators at Texas State University recently introduced a bill that would place a permanent ban on “safe spaces,” but are facing predictably intense criticism over the “detrimental” legislation.

According to a copy of the bill obtained by Campus Reform, its passage would result in a ban on “all safe spaces and equivalent spaces,” and promote a campus where students can “be open to other concepts without ‘trigger warnings.’”

“It has become a nationwide trend for colleges to allow students to escape from views and concepts that might be deemed controversial, dangerous, or offensive,” the resolution argues, explaining that “upon graduating, students will experience views that differ from their own and will not be able to retreat to safe spaces.”

The bill, set to be voted on Monday night, is facing strident opposition from left-leaning organizations and students, including a candidate for the school’s Student Body President, who shamed the sponsors of the resolution for their “detrimental piece of legislation.”

“Not only is this detrimental to the social safety of many groups here at Texas State, but a clear obstruction of our core values as a university,” Russell Boyd wrote in a statement. “As representatives of the student body, it is imperative that the student government take into account the many students that will be greatly impacted by this detrimental piece of legislation.”

Meanwhile, the school’s Pan African Action Committee also rebuked the controversial bill, publicly reprimanding one of its four cosponsors, Student Senator Alex Sherman.

“Underdeveloped and undefined, this senator has administered a relatively weak challenge to the diverse student body of Texas State,” the group protested in a statement on its Facebook page, arguing that “a school with such a diverse population deserves not fewer but more ‘safe spaces’ to facilitate dialogue and education about the communities Alex Sherman is clearly detached from.”

Another group of students, identifying themselves simply as “the student organizers” who recently circulated a sanctuary campus petition, have now drafted a letter that urges students to “testify in opposition to the bill” Monday evening, and vote for candidates who support their movement.

“Our student government has many members that scoff at the idea of helping minorities and the [sanctuary campus] petition itself,” the letter contends, noting that “allies to the petition feel like they have a target on their backs,” and once again singling out Sherman for his support of abolishing safe spaces.

While Sherman has been repeatedly, and almost exclusively, called out by his peers, the primary author of the resolution is actually Student Senator Mason McKie, who told Campus Reform that he was not “surprised by the negative reactions” to his bill, since “colleges across the country have been experiencing similar reactions when conservative views are brought to the table.”

“This piece of legislation isn’t just important for my campus, but it could be a cornerstone for many more things to come,” he continued. “Students have the right to freely express themselves. College is a time to be open to new ideas and learn from others that might not necessarily agree with you.”

DCG