California State government’s largest union is edging closer to a strike

Service Employees International Union (SEIU) Local 1000 president Yvonne Walker speaks at a rally for democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton at Sacramento City College on June 5, 2016. (Photo by Mack Ervin III)

Service Employees International Union (SEIU) Local 1000 president Yvonne Walker speaks at a rally for democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton at Sacramento City College on June 5, 2016. (Photo by Mack Ervin III)


From Sacramento Bee: SEIU Local 1000 President Yvonne Walker has called for a strike vote of the union’s 95,000 members beginning next week, according to a statement on the union website.
The union is trying to get a bigger raise than the 2.96 percent pay hike Gov. Jerry Brown’s administration is offering. Brown’s proposal would raise SEIU salaries by 12 percent over four years, but also require its members to begin paying a contribution toward their retiree health care costs.  “We still believe the state can do better,” Walker wrote in a message to SEIU members.
SEIU represents workers in nine different bargaining units. Its contracts for nurses, administrative employees and information technology workers are among the 14 state labor agreements that expired this summer.
SEIU's best buddy...

SEIU’s best buddy…


Walker wrote to union members that SEIU has been in negotiations with the state for the past six months. In July, union leadership voted to authorize a strike vote. The next step toward a strike would be a vote by union members. A vote to strike would not necessarily lead to workers walking off the job.
Before workers strike, the union likely would have to declare an impasse in negotiations and participate in mediation with the state. That process could take months. But surveying members on their willingness to strike could strengthen SEIU’s position at the bargaining table.
Last year, the California State University sweetened a contract offer for the union that represents its faculty after professors voted to strike. As a result, professors received a 10.5 percent pay raise over three years rather than 2 percent raises the state university had been offering.
The Brown administration has been offering raises of about 3 percent a year to most unions. The state’s correctional officers accepted that agreement. Other unions representing attorneys, engineers and scientists are getting bigger raises this year.
All of the new contracts call on state workers to begin to making contributions toward retiree health care. So far, most employees with new contracts are paying about 1.3 percent of their salaries toward retiree health care, with the portion rising to greater than 3 percent over time.
Walker has led the union since 2008. Her union and several others without contracts argue that they sacrificed during the recession to help the Schwarzenegger and Brown administrations resolve budget gaps.
With a better economy, they contend, the state should reward its workforce. “Now that the state’s coffers have significantly improved, we strongly feel that state employees deserve a robust improvement from pre-recession cuts. But the situation has turned bleak and sluggish in contract negotiations,” four union leaders wrote in an Oct. 10 letter to Assembly Speaker Anthony Rendon and Senate President Pro Tem Kevin de León. Those unions include two AFSCME bargaining units, a group that represents operating engineers and one more that represents psychiatric technicians.
SEIU conducted a series of surveys recently that showed its members are worried about the rising costs of housing and child care. The union says 39 percent of its members could not afford to rent a two-bedroom apartment in their communities.
CalHR spokesman Joe DeAnda said the Brown administration looks “forward to continued negotiations with SEIU, and hopes to secure an agreement that both reflects the contributions of our hard-working state employees and maintains the integrity of the state’s current budget stability.”
DCG

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Txfella
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Yeah, that sounds like a great idea…..let us know how that works out for ya.

MeThePeople
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MeThePeople

Why a government employee needs to be in a union is beyond me. Is it not true that most municipalities and states are upside down from unfunded liabilities which were from contracts agreed to by politicians paying back the unions for their votes? That Brown is not meeting their expectations is a trick, so he saves the days when the unions strike and services stop. We’ll blame them, not him. We need Trump to revitalize manufacturing and business, so we can afford all these “public servants” Who besides these union goons have cushy pensions and retirement benefits after dragging their… Read more »

Auntie Lulu
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Auntie Lulu

MeThePeople . . . I could not agree with you more! No one in the private sector is getting raises like this. These folks just seem to think that there is no end to the amounts of monies that State entities can afford to shell out for their pififul performances. Have you been to a DMV lately? It is unreal how slowly these folks, and the other’s in civil service move. Normal, everyday citizens are sick and tired of being fleeced. Just look at the “911 Operator” who would hang up on people who had called in, or she would… Read more »

Anonymous
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Anonymous

Even FDR thought gov’t employee unions were a bad idea…

MeThePeople
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MeThePeople

In private industry, when the unions strike for and force lavish benefits, the company moves to Mexico. When a PSU get these contracts, we get a Detroit or Baltimore, and of course higher taxes.
Granted there needs to be checks and balances because the Capitalists can get greedy just like the Unions; but somehow when the government gets into the act as the employer, the system fails. greedy dumb politicians.

MeThePeople
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MeThePeople

Same as when the government gets involved in healthcare and medical insurance. It’s them dumb greedy politicians (again.)

youknowwho.
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youknowwho.

Let’s go back and read the constitution again. The government needs to do what the constitution says and ONLY what it says. All manipulation of the economy, labor, healthcare and so on will always lead to disaster. The only way to stop fraud and waste in a government program is to not have a government program. Nowhere does the Constitution give the government to power to regulate these things. A bank roober was once asked “Why do you rob banks?” to which he replyed “That’s where the money is.”

TPR
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TPR

“We still believe the state can do better,” Walker wrote… Never satisfied! “Godliness with contentment is great gain.” (1st Timothy 6-16) *”…all these “public servants” … union goons have cushy pensions and retirement benefits after dragging their fat a**es between the copy machine, the break room and the toilet for 20 years…”* LOL, great description! In years gone by I have literally seen that very thing at State agencies. Not only that but the dirty looks they give you as well. They all should be kicked to the curb if, for no other reason, but for having a “lazy attitude.”

Glenn47
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Glenn47

My guess is, she would be appalled at the little .3% raise seniors are getting this year. I would suspect she keeps her position by making this ridiculous requests and thus saving her very large salary.
She needs to come down to the real world.