Author Archives: Cinderella Broom

Countdown

The week of August 12 was a countdown, though to what remains to be seen. I didn’t know it at first. Someone dear to me had died the week before, and I had miles to travel, tasks to finish and people to visit. It never occurred to me that the week following would bring more deaths.

The first happened on August 15th: the original FOTM blog was snuffed out by WordPress.

Then, from the same host, a series of kills: American Everyman, Jays Analysis, 50 Shades of Pissed Off, Fundamental Option, Chem Trails Planet, Government Rag, Dutch Sinse, together with my blog, Cinderella’s Broom. More small, independent blogs, I’m sure, were taken out, sites that shared a mission of exposing false flag operations and hoaxes, notably Sandy Hook.

A few days later, in response to my inquiry, a vaguely worded explanation arrived from WordPress, nearly identical to the one FOTM received:

The death notice was signed as shown:

Sal P.│Community Guardian │WordPress.com

In my case, there were two casualties: three-year-old Cinderella’s Broom and a much older WordPress blog, mixing personal and political topics, which I had voluntarily sealed, marked PRIVATE, with no admission granted without my approval.

Two down. By then it was obvious why WordPress had killed Cinderella’s Broom. It wasn’t because of policy violations (I had never breached the policy in force). It was because someone didn’t like the opinions being expressed and the facts being revealed.

The private blog was another matter. No one was allowed in. Why bother axing what amounted to a sealed coffin?

Two to go. Besides the two dead blogs, I had two others on my WordPress account, each of them artistic in nature without any reference to Sandy Hook, false flag ops or anything remotely political. But given what had happened to the sealed blog, I had to wonder which would be next.

I asked the vague “Sal P.” and got an answer from the phlegmatic “Knox,” who assured me that “transferring your domain to another host will not affect your other sites,” the reason being that, “they are not connected in any way to your domain.”

I wasn’t convinced. I knew I’d been foolish, putting all of my eggs in one basket. I wrote to “Knox,” asking about the private blog. “Did WP violate its own rules and allow others to view my blog who were NOT AUTHORIZED to do so? It’s a question I’m posing now and I’d like an answer.”

That sealed the coffin on the other two blogs. By that evening, I had my answer from the prickly “Fenton” (redaction is mine):

Our decision is final.

The site at ________.wordpress.com was not made open for public viewing. We are suspending your account, and as part of that all sites on your account.

Regards,

Fenton
Community Guardian
WordPress.com | Automattic

The next day, both of the artistic sites were tombstones.

It was obvious that policy violations were not the reason, and equally clear that content  wasn’t a factor in these two cases. The motive was one of the oldest in the homicide business: revenge.

It lives. WordPress, like other corporate-owned social media, was never a trustworthy platform for the truth. It was the siren calling out to survivors of the great deception, people willing to take a risk, swim out and grab hold of the rock. Then, when it had us sufficiently attached to its slippery surface, down it took us.

The trouble for the controllers of big-tech media is that too many of us had just enough time to stand up and shout. Inconvenient facts have been disclosed. The truth has been told, and the reports of its death are greatly exaggerated.

~C.

Please follow and like us:
0