Alabama passes bill requiring child molesters be castrated

On May 15, 2019, Alabama’s Republican governor Kay Ivey signed into law the Alabama Human Life Protection Act— America’s most restrictive anti-abortion law that makes it a felony for doctors to perform or attempt to perform an abortion in the state. The new law allows no exceptions for rape or incest but does allow for abortions in cases where the mother’s life is at risk.

Alabama’s anti-abortion law provoked these responses from the Left:

  • Feminist, attorney, and NYT columnist Jill Filipovic proposeed a requirement that a quarter inch be cut off of a mans’s penis for every pregnancy he creates.
  • Being the exhibitionist narcissist that she is, actress Emily Ratajkowski posted to Instagram a nude photo of herself in protest.
  • U.N. human rights spokeswoman Ravina Shamdasani expressed “concern” that Alabama and several other states, including Georgia, passed laws “severely restricting access to safe abortion for women,” which would “jeopardize” women’s life, health and safety by driving them underground.

Now, Alabama is doing another good thing.

The New York Daily News reports (via Syracuse.com) today that the Alabama Legislature has passed a bill that would require chemical castration of child molesters over age 21 who have abused a child younger than 13.

The bill, known as HB379, would make the measure a condition of parole. Convicted sex offenders would have to undergo chemical castration before leaving prison, both as punishment and to prevent them from harming more children in the future.

The legislation has been introduced before, but this is the first time it has passed both the state House and Senate.

It now awaits Gov. Kay Ivey’s signature.

Attorney Raymond Johnson told WIAT the measure could be seen as a violation of the Eighth Amendment, which prohibits cruel and unusual punishment, and predicted it would be challenged in court: “They’re going to claim that it is cruel and unusual punishment for someone who has served their time and for the rest of their life have to be castrated.”

But State Rep. Steve Hurst (R-Calhoun County), HB 379’s chief sponsor, maintains that the bill would prevent other children from being hurt. He told WIAT:

“They have marked this child for life and the punishment should fit the crime. I had people call me in the past when I introduced it and said, don’t you think this is inhumane? I asked them what’s more inhumane than when you take a little infant child, and you sexually molest that infant child when the child cannot defend themselves or get away, and they have to go through all the things they have to go through? If you want to talk about inhumane—that’s inhumane.”

Some objections to the bill were framed around whether or not the measure would actually work. State Rep. Sam Jones (D-Mobile) said: “A molester is still going to molest. Medication won’t do it.”

According to to a July 2010 Harvard Medical School Mental Health Letter, “Pessimism about pedophilia“, drugs that suppress production of the male hormone testosterone are used to reduce the frequency or intensity of a pedophile’s sexual desire, but it may take 3 to 10 months for testosterone suppression to reduce sexual desire. The health letter notes that “physical castration is another option“.

The Harvard mental health letter says pedophilia is incurable:

There is no cure, so the focus is on protecting children.

Pedophilia, the sexual attraction to children who have not yet reached puberty, remains a vexing challenge for clinicians and public officials. Classified as a paraphilia, an abnormal sexual behavior, researchers have found no effective treatment. Like other sexual orientations, pedophilia is unlikely to change. The goal of treatment, therefore, is to prevent someone from acting on pedophile urges — either by decreasing sexual arousal around children or increasing the ability to manage that arousal. But neither is as effective for reducing harm as preventing access to children, or providing close supervision.

Here are other interesting points in the Harvard health letter:

  • Estimates of recidivism of convicted pedophiles vary because studies define “recidivism” term in different ways. The estimates range from 10% to 50%. One long-term study of previously convicted pedophiles (with an average follow-up of 25 years) found a 25% recidivism rate for heterosexual pedophiles, and 50% recidivism for homosexual or bisexual pedophiles.
  • Experts estimate that only one in 20 cases of child sexual abuse is reported.
  • Nearly all people with pedophilic tendencies are male. Studies of child molesters have reported that only 1% to 6% of perpetrators are female.
  • Several reports have concluded that most people with pedophilic tendencies eventually act on their sexual urges in some way.
  • Fears about predatory behavior are valid. Most pedophiles who act on their impulses do so by manipulating children and gradually desensitizing them to inappropriate behavior. Then they escalate it. Pedophiles are able to do this because in most cases they already know the children or have access to them. In about 60% to 70% of child sexual abuse cases involving pedophiles, the perpetrator is a relative, neighbor, family friend, teacher, coach, clergyman, or someone else in regular contact with the child.

See also:

~Eowyn

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chemtrailssuckTheManSteven BroilesWatertenderCalGirl Recent comment authors
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Sanders
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Sanders

The only thing that will stop a child molester is removing their head from their neck – not castration.

DCG
Admin

Works for me.

Auntie Lulu
Guest
Auntie Lulu

For those who feel such sorrow for the perpetrators. . . . they obviously do not have any realization what the poor children who have been victimized have gone thru, and will go thru until the end of their time on Earth. It is the victim’s burden that people really do not give credence to. The fact that this article indicates that only “one in twenty cases” of child abuse ever get reported . . . . which means we have a horrific number of bruised and broken people out in society that went thru this ultimate child abuse, and… Read more »

Lophatt
Member
Lophatt

Lulu, I don’t feel any sorrow for the perpetrators, but I think there are far more “victims” than many would like to admit. What those victims do internally to cope with this is important. If they dwell on it it can ruin them through no fault of their own. If they realize that these things happen, they can put it behind them and move on. I am almost as annoyed with the “victim culture” as I am with the predators. It can be a serious mistake to inflate the importance of something bad. There are support groups for EVERYTHING these… Read more »

Lana
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Lana

Just my two cents here…. It is not about dwelling on it… or playing up the victim. I get what you are saying about the victim culture, but what you are talking about are broad groups designated as victims, and of course supposed mass remedies invariably calculated to give the government more control….as if that ever made anyone’s life better or healed anything. When these things happen to a child or even a young person they distort and scar a person in inumerable ways because the intellect is not fully formed, nor are the emotions able to cope, and it… Read more »

Lophatt
Member
Lophatt

Believe me, I’m not trying to diminish anyone’s trauma. I was simply trying to make a couple of general points that I happen to know from experience are true. When something traumatic happens it has to be dealt with. Dealing with doesn’t mean wallowing in it. All of the emotions that come with shock, disappointment, betrayal, etc., are real. They have to be weighed against the reality that it has happened, now what are we to do about it? I have had traumatic things happen to me as well. They are a part of me forever. I am just fortunate,… Read more »

Lana
Guest
Lana

” I just think that people are more encouraged now to stay “victims” than to put bad thing behind them. I fail to see what’s served by constantly resurrecting things that can’t be changed.”

Totally agree!

Also you comments on purity and sex as a construct is very perceptive and true. Most of us are very heavily influenced by our culture and are not even aware of it.

CalGirl
Guest
CalGirl

Here Here. Wowza…agree.

Lophatt
Member
Lophatt

It’s not that I’m unsympathetic. I just hate to see people torture themselves. We haven’t been kind to our women. I sort of get this “historically” and “culturally” but it doesn’t make it “right’.

Watertender
Member
Watertender

My wife has a friend that is a professional victim. She has had some tough things happen yes but she wallows in it. She goes from support group to support group crying her tale of woe. When she sees a therapist and is offered constructive approaches to get past what she is there for she freaks out and tries a different therapist. I have had some really harsh things happen in my life but I do not pity myself. I keep going because the alternative is not a viable choice…

William
Member
William

Your description of your wife’s friend is typical. Support groups have their place but they are not intended to go on forever. People are now encouraged to embrace and identify with their “disorders” -I’m an addict, I’m bipolar, I’m an abuse survivor/victim – and then attend 12-step type groups and wallow in their infantile emotions forever, never resolving anything. 12-step in particular is the greatest impediment to authentic recovery, as I’ve said elsewhere, a mix of old time religion and new age psychobabble. It’s the most commonly used model for groups, a design for failure and lifetime dependence. Maybe that’s… Read more »

Lophatt
Member
Lophatt

I don’t know how “chemical castration” works. I’m assuming its something that has to be done on a regular basis. Also, as your article points out, there are various forms of abuse. Even if the pervert is incapable of normal intercourse doesn’t mean he can’t fondle kids another way. I agree that “supervision” is better, but how you would do that is a problem. This has been around since the dawn of time. I don’t know if it is anymore prevalent now than previously, but we hear more about it now. In primitive societies (at least the ones who don’t… Read more »

Watertender
Member
Watertender

Chemical castration is the same as hormone treatment for prostate cancer. Prostate cancer thrives on testosterone so a hormone is given to slow the production of testosterone. Leuprorelin otherwise known as Lupron is a very common drug used for the procedure. It is given in 3 or 6 month increments depending on the severity of the cancer and the prescribed dosage. It literally takes away the sex drive. They could try it and if they miss a scheduled dose then there is always a straight razor for the next treatment. There have been some cases of chemical castration where the… Read more »

Lophatt
Member
Lophatt

Ha, ha, good plan.

Goldbug
Guest
Goldbug

Sleepy Joe, ya’ better stay outta’ Alabama!

Lophatt
Member
Lophatt

He’ll have to finish his campaign with an IV bottle next to him.

Tannhauser
Guest
Tannhauser

Millstone the bastards!

andre
Guest
andre

I don’t know much about chemical castration, but I say it is a good start. Alabama is on its way. This is the way to lift a curse off of the land–true justice, watching out for the innocent, protecting those most vulnerable–the unborn and children. By the way, I do believe that a molester can be delivered by the power of God, because with God all things are possible, but it must be actively pursued and much healing and deliverance is necessary. Many are passing on what they have experienced as children.

Watertender
Member
Watertender

andre a lot of cons “find God” in prison. There may be an occasional success by that route for curing a pervert but my money would not be bet on that result. I have family that gets religion anytime they get in trouble. I say they would steal Christ off the Cross and come back foe the nails. I am sure a lot of molesters pass on the things they learned in being molested. It has to stop with the one molested. You can make the choice to make it stop with you.

William
Member
William

The Harvard Medical School Mental Health Letter characterizes pedophilia as a sexual orientation. They would. In this way they implicitly normalize it, at least partially, rather like the pedo groups that are now calling themselves Minor Attracted People (MAP’s). Isn’t that special. That’s equivalent to defining heroin addiction as a lifestyle choice. Pedophilia is a severe and destructive sexual DIS-orientation. From my experience most child sexual abusers were abused themselves. Child sexual abuse is the ultimate invalidation, a child without adult coping skills is reduced to an object of sexual desire. So pedophilia may be understood as a maladaptive reaction… Read more »

Lophatt
Member
Lophatt

I’m afraid I’m deeply suspicious about psychology’s ability or reason for declaring something a “disease”. The implication is that, because it is an “illness” it is probably curable and the person so affected isn’t to blame. We had a little discussion a while back on this topic as it relates to addiction. I think they are very similar. One may have a “predilection” to be an addict, or a pervert, but has the ability to not do so. This also, naturally I think, flows into the whole “proud to be queer” movement. Likewise, one could take the position that “monkeys… Read more »

William
Member
William

As far as addiction goes, the disease concept was all about absolving addicts of personal responsibility, what they call “stigma”. God forbid someone should make the choice to get high and kill someone in a car crash because they are too impaired to drive and then be “stigmatized”. With “mental illness” it’s all about arbitrarily creating discrete, unitary, stand-alone pathologies (diseases/disorders) that are treatable with drugs, the “medical model”. Because that’s where the money is. And the power, and control. Mental disorders used to be described as “reactions” because that’s what “mental illness” is: compensatory reactions to abnormal stress and… Read more »

Lophatt
Member
Lophatt

Last I heard, having sorrow for your sins is still a requirement.

chemtrailssuck
Guest

Not all abusers were abused, thankfully, and some who were never abused become abusers. Chemical castration for those who “can’t control themselves” sounds like a step in the right direction. Child sex abuse creates SO many problems for kids, makes them do self mutilation, suicide attempts and/or thoughts, and can cause them to get into relationships with horrible awful abusive men because they think they “deserve” them, or become afraid of sex or become nymphos, all sorts of horrible things. Then there are ones who were too young but KNOW something happened/blocked it out and can’t for the life of… Read more »

Alma
Member
Alma

Is it not cruel and unusual punishment and a lifetime of trauma for a child to be subjected to rape? Cut it off and the hands too, and I bet you there won’t be a repeat offender.

Lophatt
Member
Lophatt

Reading up on “chemical castration” leaves me with the opinion that it may not be ideal for this. They have to get treatments every three months. They can still get an erection. Most of the narrative is “fluffy”, i.e. nothing is absolute. They claim that it reduces libido. My thinking is that they should reduce (eliminate) exposure to kids. So, merely relating it to the article, I wonder what sort of input they sought before deciding this was the way to go? Even physical castration would not prevent a pervert from molesting children. There is a “halfway” house for sex… Read more »

CalGirl
Guest
CalGirl

I want to move to there from my present home in Mexifornia….which would NEVER impose such a penalty.

Steven Broiles
Member

I just read tonight that candidate Joe Biden has cancelled his appearance in the Great State of Alabama! Whuda thunkit?

TheMan
Guest
TheMan

The chemical castration drugs that these convicted pedos will receive are the very same drugs that men with prostate cancer receive during treatment.
By forcing them to undergo chemical castration we may be actually increasing their life expectancy by a decade or two…ie; by preventing them from getting Prostate Cancer (prostate Cancer kills more Men than Breast Cancer kills women).
Also….the primary drug for chemical castration/prostate cancer treatment costs aprox. $600 per injection (one injection is required every three months). So a convicted pedo may cost the State taxpayers $120k in injections (50 years).

chemtrailssuck
Guest

That’s a drop in the bucket compared to the horrible mental and physical damage they do to children and the cost of incarcerating them.

TheMan
Guest
TheMan

The point is:
Chemical Castration should NOT be an option. Why should it be? It is vastly More expensive (to administer it and to monitor compliance) and not as effective.
These convicts should be given the choice of having an ACTUAL castration (a fraction of the costs of chemical castration)….in exchange for a reduced prison sentence.

Alma
Member
Alma

If they had cut little pieces for every time Creepy Joe had touched little girls I’m sure there would only be ground beef!

chemtrailssuck
Guest

Chemical castration is not cruel or unusual punishment. It’s not like they’re cutting off their testicles.