Traitor Hanoi Jane and other elderly actresses star in new movie, “Book Club”

Just what everyone wants to see: A bunch of elderly women getting excited because of the book, “Fifty Shades of Grey.”

This new movie opens on May 18 and stars Hanoi Jane, Candice Bergen, Diane Keaton and Mary Steenburgen. The premise, from Rotten Tomatoes:

“Diane (Diane Keaton) is recently widowed after 40 years of marriage. Vivian (Jane Fonda) enjoys her men with no strings attached. Sharon (Candice Bergen) is still working through a decades-old divorce. Carol’s (Mary Steenburgen) marriage is in a slump after 35 years. Four lifelong friends’ lives are turned upside down to hilarious ends when their book club tackles the infamous Fifty Shades of Grey. From discovering new romance to rekindling old flames, they inspire each other to make their next chapter the best chapter.”

Some of the movie reviews.

From Hollywood Reporter: “Instead, sit back and watch four dazzling pros inhabit a sitcommy world like nobody’s business, providing whatever dimension it has and selling lines that have no business being sold.”

From the A.V. Club: “The script is so lazy and outdated in its humor, it condescends to the same audience it purports to empower.”

From the Mercury Entertainment: “Were “Book Club” an actual book, a page turner it would not be. The romantic comedy would be more of a lazy read — its plot developments range from sloppy to almost non-existent — but one with reasonably appealing characters.”

Another Hollyweird movie I won’t be seeing.

See also:

DCG

56 responses to “Traitor Hanoi Jane and other elderly actresses star in new movie, “Book Club”

  1. Have seen the previews of this and as far as I am concerned if hanoi jane is in it I will never watch it. More over sexed sitcom appeal to minds that are sinful. Will be a massive amount of wasted time.

    Liked by 5 people

  2. REALLY? Hanoi Jane??? She was young when she got involved in that event. One would THINK it was time to stop using this sensationalism so one can get noticed and have others rant with indignation about what she did FIFTY YEARS AGO!!! Time to grow up…eh? There are more important things to talk about…more important things going on in the world RIGHT NOW that this writer could be writing about to wake people up. To get them informed with information that could make their lives easier…get them prepared for what’s coming down the pike. Not this old…old…very old past of Jane Fonda.

    Like

    • I will never get past what she did to the military of this country she is a traitor in my book and always will be sorry but she gets what she deserves.

      Liked by 6 people

    • sixlittlerabbits

      On the contrary, Hanoi Jane remains a Communist and a traitor. She has never apologized for her actions during the Vietnam War, just made excuses: oh, golly, gee, she didn’t realize …..

      Liked by 6 people

    • Here’s some more current news about Hanoi Jane’s current views. Once a traitor, always a traitor.

      And if you don’t like my blog posts and my sensationalism, feel free to ignore them!

      https://fellowshipoftheminds.com/2017/10/19/traitor-jane-fonda-says-shes-not-proud-of-america/

      Liked by 5 people

    • Yep, there are more important things to talk about. Too bad Fonda didn’t have the GUTS to speak up to prevent more sexual abuse when she KNEW about Weinstein. Why didn’t SHE say something to “wake people up” and “get them informed?”

      She’s a COWARD:

      “Jane Fonda: I knew about Weinstein, and I’m ‘ashamed’ I didn’t say anything”

      http://money.cnn.com/2017/10/12/media/harvey-weinstein-jane-fonda/index.html

      Liked by 3 people

    • PS: MY blog post so I’ll post WHATEVER I WANT.

      Liked by 4 people

    • “REALLY? Hanoi Jane??? … There are more important things to talk about…more important things going on in the world RIGHT NOW that this writer could be writing about to wake people up.”

      Hanoi Jane. Hanoi Jane. Hanoi Jane. Hanoi Jane. Hanoi Jane. Hanoi Jane.

      Who are you to decide what’s “important”? Every day DCG writes posts on “important things going on in the world RIGHT NOW” — including about Hanoi Jane.

      You don’t like what we post on FOTM? GET OUT!!!!

      Liked by 5 people

    • You know, when I was a bit younger I thought that maybe we should let the Hanoi Jane thing go too because, as you said, we all make stupid mistakes when we are young. But the truth is, I had not known the details at the time when I had these sentiments. I had no idea that she actually tore up messages that the POWs had slipped to her and so much more, I only knew generalities. So if you have not looked at the particulars of what she ACTUALLY did, then I suggest you do so, because what she did was inexcusable and had nothing to do with youth. If you have looked at the details, and you can condone what she did as a sin of youth, then I would say you are incapable of seeing the actual character of a person. As others have pointed out here, the spoiled hardhearted communist brat who did the hideous things to our servicemen has only changed into an arrogant old communist.

      Liked by 6 people

      • Yeah, I’m a Viet Nam Vet too and I don’t begrudge anybody who hated that stupid war. I didn’t like it either, didn’t do me any good, but I’m not ashamed to say it.

        It was all the other stuff, like you just described, that made her behavior an outrage. I disagreed, was drafted, and served. She disagreed and committed an act of treason while disrespecting those that did their duty.

        If I had refused to go I would have gone to prison. She became something of a leftist hero and she’s going to die a multi-millionaire. It’s a good thing I believe that justice belongs to the afterlife.

        Liked by 6 people

        • Lophatt you just said what I meant to say, but forgot to add in my writing frenzy…that is, none of those young men asked to go fight that stupid war. As you said, the war was a separate matter. To this day, I can’t believe the arrogant, viscious, mean spirited ignorance of how so many of the antiwar crowd treated our vets when they came home, spitting on them and more, when they had NOTHING to do with being there and fighting except they were forced to. For those that signed up thinking they were doing their patriotic duty …well that is what I call a forgivable mistake of youth. I can only chalk up the failure by the antiwar crowd to differentiate between the young soldiers themselves and the war to the pea size brain of budding communists.

          Liked by 5 people

        • Thank you for your service my friend.

          Liked by 2 people

      • “I had no idea that she actually tore up messages that the POWs had slipped to her”

        Fonda is accused, rightly, of many things, but not this one. Fonda met only seven American POWs while in North Vietnam: Edison Miller, Walter Wilber, James Padgett, David Wesley Hoffman, Kenneth James Fraser, William G. Byrns, and Edward Elias. None of those men reported her sabotaging their attempts to slip her information about themselves, and anyone other than those seven men who asserts he was “there” and witnessed such a scene is simply not telling the truth.

        Some of the POWs who actually did meet with Jane Fonda, such as Edison Miller, have spoken out on the record over the years to disclaim the apocryphal stories about her: “The whole [e-mail] story about Jane Fonda is just malarkey,” said Edison Miller, 73, of California, a former Marine Corps pilot held more than five years. Miller was among seven POWs who met with Fonda in Hanoi. He said he didn’t recall her asking any questions other than about their names, if that. He said that he passed her no piece of paper, and that to his knowledge, no other POW in the group did, despite the e-mail’s claims.

        Col. Larry Carrigan, the U.S. serviceman whose name is invoked in the e-mailed reproduced at the head of this article, has affirmed that he neither claimed nor experienced any of what has been attributed to him, and that he never even met Jane Fonda: “It’s a figment of somebody’s imagination.” said Ret. Col. Larry Carrigan, one of the servicemen mentioned in the ‘slips of paper’ incident. Carrigan was shot down over North Vietnam in 1967 and did spend time in a POW camp. He has no idea why the story was attributed to him, saying, “I never met Jane Fonda.” In 2005, the Minneapolis Star Tribune reported that Carrigan “is so tired of having to repeat that he wasn’t beaten after Fonda’s visit and that there were no beating deaths at that time that he won’t talk to the media anymore.”

        Though the source is Snopes (https://www.snopes.com/fact-check/jane-fonda-pows/), all the above can be verified and has been verified.

        Liked by 2 people

    • Comrade Obama

      Sgoodstone is one of those morons who forgives traitors and murderers. Make no doubt about what her crimes are. Hanoi features her photos in their “peace” museum. But then again people like snowflakes burn the US flag and spit on veterans. So I long for the day I can drink to her memory and piss on her grave. She’ll need it being on the 9th ring of hell.

      Liked by 5 people

    • Comrade Obama

      How much pot do you have to smoke to make such a ludicrous statement?

      Liked by 3 people

    • Comrade Obama

      You can always count on snowflakes to ignore the legacy and sins of some critters while preaching to the rest of us about morality. May she burn on the 9th ring of hell for all those she betrayed and for those murderers she cheered on.

      You can always judge people by their heroes and those they defend.

      Liked by 3 people

    • That Jane Fonda’s traitorous sedition occurred 50 some odd years ago is irrelevant sgoodstone. There is no statute of limitations on murder. An American POW was beaten to death because of what she did. In addition, she voluntarily posed for communist propaganda photos, the most onerous being the one where she is looking through the sights of an NVA anti-aircraft gun. Lest you think that is nothing, call Senator John McCain, who was shot down by one of those guns. Let him tell you what it was like in an communist POW prison, when he was hanged on a wall suspended by his two broken arms hearing his communist wardens laughing at him as he screamed for hours in pain.

      Hanoi Jane made her trip to Hanoi in 1972. She was NOT young. She was 35 years old. (She was born December 21, 1937. Do the math.)

      As for me, I didn’t wait for the draft; I enlisted in 1965 for four years of active duty. I volunteered for Vietnam. I realize fully that this “event” was most likely a false flag. I thought something on that order even as I was signing my name to the enlistment papers. However, I didn’t much care. Vietnam was the event of my generation. In the politics of the day it was the right thing to do. I thought so then; I think so today. I have two battle stars (bronze), and my discharge has a big “Honorable” written across the top.

      I retired for the first time in 2001 after 33 years as an investigative reporter/special projects editor, and managing editor. I went to work afterwards as a public school teacher in an inner-city ghetto school. My youngest mother was 12; my youngest felon was 13; at least two of my eighth grade honor students were taken out of my class in handcuffs for dealing drugs.

      The teacher across the hall from my classroom was Peter, who escaped from Saigon with his family as the NVA was overrunning the city. He became part of the “boat people” flotilla that carried Vietnamese all across the Tonkin Gulf and the South China Sea. Peter had carried a flag of South Vietnam with him as they escaped. Because of the overwhelmingly minority population of the student mix, many rooms had flags over their windows from all around the world. Peter had asked for permission to display the flag he had carried from Vietnam. School officials denied his request. They didn’t want any “controversy” in the school, libtards that they were. A couple of weeks after that, Peter heard that I was a veteran. He came over and asked me where I had served

      ‘Vietnam,” I said.
      “Vietnam?” he said. “Vietnam? You fought for my country?”
      “Well,” I said, “yes I did.”
      “You fought for my country!” he said, and he started to cry– a grown man who had endured the destruction of his way of life, who had toughed out rescuing his family, enduring hardship and the loss of all they had worked for all their lives, crying in a school hallway because he had found one man who had fought for his country and was not ashamed for having done so.

      This is why I will never NEVER come to terms with Fonda, be it 50 years or 500. She is now, and will always be, a traitor who is responsible for the death of an American patriot, and who has never once had the decency to say she was sorry.

      As for your comments to DCG, I think that rather than criticism, you owe her a vote of thanks for her post. She is relentless in bringing insight, rational perspectives, intelligent analysis, and discriminating information to this fellowship.

      DCG and Dr. Eowyn deserve our honor and thanks for their relentless search for the truth and their tireless work on behalf of FOTM. They are like the small voices that cry out in the wilderness proclaiming the truth. Prepare the way, for the time is at hand. My only regret about FOTM is that I did not find this fellowship sooner.

      Liked by 5 people

      • Grif,

        I read your comment with tears in my eyes. I salute and thank you for your service to our country — in the battlefields of Vietnam and in that inner-city school. I am honored to have you in our fellowship.

        Liked by 3 people

        • I don’t know what to say, Dr. Eowyn. DCG sent me balloon hearts. Thank you both for your kind thoughts. I am not sure I can adequately express how much they mean. I am sure you and DCG are aware that our reception when we came home from Vietnam (back to the world) was far different from the receptions given to those who are returning from our current wars. So to have you two send such obviously heartfelt expressions of thanks is truly a blessing to me. Thank you ever so much.

          Liked by 4 people

    • Did you lose anyone in VN? If not please sit down and be quiet and let the adults comment. You can never get over a traitor that refuses to apologize. She could have ended this years ago.
      Your comment was very hurtful to those that love this country and lived VN for years.

      Liked by 5 people

      • Glenn47 . . . . I can only agree wholeheartedly with you. The young men who were sent to VN were my age group . . . . some never came back, except in a coffin, and other’s came back–but they were never the same. They were horribly psychologically damaged by the things they saw there, and the things they were commanded to do there. I have outlived many of the men who went to VN, many were taken by the ravages of Agent Orange, and they lived to see their babies being born with horrible birth defects! I would say that this particular commenter just does not have enough of the facts to be able to weigh in on the subject!

        Liked by 4 people

    • In ROTC, my commandant of cadets was a Jane Fonda fan. (He’d joined that service to get out of being drafted and sent to ‘Nam after being at Woodstock, etc.) This was at Kent State, where we got harassed and called “babykillers” (while being unsupported by said dork) daily. I switched to another service which didn’t feel “embracing alternate views” in such circumstances was appropriate.

      Liked by 4 people

    • sgoodstone . . . . I am taken aback by your comment. Any nation that forgives, or forgets those who have acted in a traitorous manner toward their country, without ever apologizing for their behavior . . . . are exceedingly foolish. To this day our nation still castigates “Benedict Arnold” for his traitorous behavior during the American Revolution. The horrible treatment that our military POW’s received as a direct result of Hanoi Jane’s actions is not something to be forgiven, or forgot. Would it be a reasonably excuse that if a 19 year old murdered one of your family, well after all . . . they were young! (Sarc) I find your argument both insulting, and rather lame.

      As far as castigating any of the wonderful members of the FOTM family who give so freely of their time and talent to bring articles to our recollection . . . rather than getting your bowels in an upset over this site, you should just go away! Far away!

      Liked by 4 people

  3. The women of “Golden Girls” were younger than these four. Just another movie with a bunch of old commies in it. They are not funny.

    Liked by 6 people

  4. sixlittlerabbits

    One to skip. Eww. How to grow old ungracefully without dignity or honor. These botoxed, face- and other parts-lifted actresses are a joke, especially Hanoi Jane Fonda.

    Liked by 5 people

  5. I saw the movie trailer on Roku and was going to warn our readers about this disgusting movie. Thank you, DCG!

    Liked by 3 people

    • I don’t think you have to warn anyone who is a regular here Dr. Ewoyn -we are pretty much of the same mind as the title of your website indicates. I saw the trailer too and found it utterly embarrassing that mature women are being portrayed in the manner that this movie does. Just plain stupid in my opinion- hope it falls flat on it’s face.

      Liked by 4 people

  6. I used to give Hanoi Jane the benefit of the doubt because she was raised without religion; My understanding is that her father, actor Henry Fonda, was a secular atheist. But as I read your post here, I recalled that, years ago, Jane Fonda said she was, at that time, “a Christian.” Wow, that was a fad.

    If one converts to, or sticks with, a real Christian worldview and ethos, Our Lord WILL set out to test that person’s RESOLVE. As is all Good: Our Lord is completely WITHIN HIS RIGHTS to test: He already Knows how FULL OF CRAP we all are, at one point or another. That’s not the problem: At the end of the Game, as we approach His White Throne of Judgment, WE shall know whether we were true or not. We shall know if we truly repented and changed and turned toward Him or not.
    So why now NOW? After all, NOW is the time to stop our sin, to turn to Christ, to repent, to change our lives: Once we are before His White Throne of Judgment, it shall be TOO LATE!!!

    THIS is PRECISELY what Jean-Paul Sartre’s problem was. Ditto his lesbian (?) friend, Simone deBeauvoir. Ditto Voltaire, Henry Fonda and millions of other sinners. It appears to me that THIS is what Jane Fonda’s problem is.

    A lot of veterans love to rip Jane Fonda for what she did. They may be within their rights to do so (despite what Christ Said about forgiving our enemies). But let’s put things in context: Wasn’t LBJ’s crime of lying us into war in Viet Nam the bigger crime? Yes, I would say so, especially since now we know what he also did, later, with the attack on the USS Liberty.
    In the meantime, Jane Fonda seems to seek out any and every so-called remedy for her existential alienation EXCEPT the ONE THING that could really cure it, ONCE AND FOR ALL: Our Blessed Lord.

    I, too, have this problem, and I am resorting to prayer, on a daily basis, and I am keenly aware of my own spiritual torpor and worn-outness called ACEDIA. Every day I am dogged by a feeling of being worn-out, of wondering what might have been had I been different, etc., etc. I may have to live with this LOUSY FEELING for the rest of my life: It still remains as NO EXCUSE not to keep plodding forward.
    So this is my estimation of Jane Fonda’s real problem, and I have some identification, albeit from the negative side of the equation. I hope she comes to the Truth in another Book, the Bible, and really tries Christianity this time around, before it is too late for her.
    It’s already too late for people like her father, Albert Camus, and a number of other people whom we have never heard of. And given the state of affairs the World is entering into right now, we’re all going to need all the Christ we can possibly get.

    Liked by 1 person

    • “A lot of veterans love to rip Jane Fonda for what she did. They may be within their rights to do so (despite what Christ Said about forgiving our enemies).”

      Did she ask Vietnam veterans, including the many who died, for forgiveness? Did she express remorse? Are we to forgive people who are unapologetic, unremorseful, and who continue to be in our faces?

      What exactly does “forgiveness” mean, stevenbroiles? Do define it for us, and tell us how you have “forgiven” those who had done you wrong. I seem to remember you referring in comments, again and again and again, how you had been abused and mistreated when you were a school teacher, including by certain women whom you identify to be satanists and witches. Have you forgiven them?

      Liked by 3 people

      • In a minor or negative way, I have forgiven my abusers, at least to this extent: They may remain wrong and unrepentant. If they are, I do not own that problem. I made up my mind to get on with my life, because that’s all I can do. I have no choice but to leave the rest up to God.
        This may not constitute a theological definition of forgiveness, per se, but I recall what my mother told me, time and again, including one of the last times I saw her: “Bad things happen to everyone, Steven, but you DWELL in them.”
        I know I’ve held grudges and resentments for YEARS. I cannot afford to hold them anymore, so I don’t. This may not gain me any merit, but at least it’s one negative I no longer carry.

        Jane Fonda is flawed, and she’s still wrong for what she did. I don’t remember if she apologized for her disgraceful conduct in Viet Nam or not. But I’m not going to waste time steaming over her, any more than I will waste any more time steaming over my last assistant principal in education. My last A.P. never apologized to me; I don’t need it. But I’m not going to dwell in misery over what she did, and that’s ditto for the others—I have my own guilt to deal with.

        Liked by 1 person

        • I gather by your comment that your CONTEXTUAL definition for “forgiveness” is to not dwell on it. I don’t believe VN vets still “dwell” on Jane Fonda’s betrayal — no one is having sleepless nights because of her; she’s not that important. You are confusing not forgetting what she did with not forgiving.

          To forget the wrong that someone did is to put yourself at risk of being wronged again. That’s being stupid. Jesus said to forgive; He didn’t command us to forget.

          Liked by 4 people

          • Good point, duly noted.
            From what I heard from the late Dr. D. James Kennedy on one of his sermons on the radio, he spoke about forgiveness. (This was ten or more years ago.) From what I recall, he asked, rhetorically, what forgiveness meant. He gave his sermon, and answered, that, when one forgives, he holds the offense of the other “to be of no account.” The context was basically this: As Christ’s Death on the Cross made forgiveness possible, Our Lord transferred our guilt from “our account” to “His Account.” I can’t remember the entire sermon, but he used the example of a bank account transaction as a metaphor, as I recall.
            In this regard, I would hope that my offenses will be held “as no account,” or “as being of no account.” I don’t care for a lot of people in the public eye, and we know their name is legion. But I would hope for them that their offenses would be held “as being of no account.” I believe that forgiveness and Mercy is available to all who have been forgiving and merciful; The question is, Why are the takers of this Great Offer so few?

            You do point out one critically important flaw in my reasoning, and, again, point duly noted. But, at the same time, I do recall God the Father, in a book of the Old Testament, telling someone, “I will take your sins and drop them in the bottom of the ocean.” Nietzsche WAS a madman, but he had a point, echoed by Jim Morrison: “Learn to forget.” If God would forgive but never choose to forget (as my fourth grade teacher, Mrs. Hoffman kept insisting upon), what, then, would be the point??? If the forgiven sinner actually FORGETS how to sin (and that is part of what Purgatory is for, I believe), why, then, would God choose to remember???

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        • For what its worth, Jane Fonda doesn’t mean enough to me to care. People spit on me and called me names for doing what I was required to do. She will have to answer for her decisions, the others for theirs.

          She is entitled to her political views even if I don’t agree with them. I respect that. I probably would not have argued with her about that war, or others. I have often thought that what I elected to do was cowardly. I could have stood on my convictions and gone to jail.

          Of course nothing is as simple as that. I had a father that loved me and others who respected me. They would not have understood such a decision. My father went through the entirety of WWII in the tank corps and was wounded six times. He didn’t glorify war, or his service, but he taught me that it was my duty for my country.

          Jane Fonda has the right to express her beliefs. She should have paid for her actions, however. Just like the recent put upon ball fetcher who wouldn’t stand for the flag. I say “fine”, I respect your right. Now, you’re fired.

          Liked by 6 people

          • “Jane Fonda has the right to express her beliefs.”

            It is one thing to be anti the VN war. It is quite another thing to actually side with the enemy, the Viet Cong, and make propaganda for them. Before her trip to North VN, she was recruited by and met with a North Vietnamese intelligence officer. And it is altogether unconscionable that she called American POWs “war criminals”, hypocrites, liars, and pawns”. All of which goes way beyond “expressing her beliefs”.

            https://fellowshipoftheminds.com/2011/08/21/jane-fonda-her-north-vietnamese-intelligence-officer/

            Liked by 4 people

            • That’s what I said. She should pay for her decision. If you don’t agree, that’s fine. My opinion is that I don’t tell others what to think or say. But, if they choose an action, it is their responsibility for the consequences.

              We have WAY too much demanding that everyone think alike and say only what’s approved. I’ve said that I don’t see us as “the hammer of God” or something. There WILL be an accounting and if she owes, she’ll pay.

              Liked by 3 people

              • Sometimes, I’m flummoxed by your reaction. Of course I agree she should pay for her actions. Nor am I demanding that you or everyone think alike and say only what’s approved — as if I either had that power or the desire. I was simply pointing out that she did way more than simply “expressing her beliefs” — which is the right of every American, whether anti- or pro-war. She undertook BEHAVIORS that were hurtful and damaging and treasonous.

                Liked by 4 people

                • And, I have faith that she’ll pay for her actions one day. Right now, I have a hard time summoning up much feeling about Jane Fonda when there are so many others who so richly deserve acrimony. But, that too is everybody’s choice.

                  I don’t think it hurts Jane Fonda or improves anyone’s “standing” to thump one’s chest over her idiotic antics from 40+ years ago. I was there and remember them quite well. I thought her a fool then, as I do now.

                  I’m afraid I’m not much of a joiner.

                  Liked by 5 people

                • For what it’s worth, I agree that, in the moral sense, Jane Fonda’s actions in Viet Nam constituted treason in that she gave “aid and comfort to the enemy” by way of “an overt act” that had two (or more) witnesses. But, legally, war was never formally declared by Congress upon Viet Nam (and a vote on this in Congress later on was defeated).
                  In the same vein, I believe that Lyndon Baines Johnson’s actions in the assassination of his former “boss,” President Kennedy, constituted an act of treason in the moral order, just as much as his lying to the American public upon the false flag event we know as the Gulf of Tonkin incident.

                  My question is simply this: All Right, both Fonda and Johnson committed acts of treason in the moral but not legal order (as defined by the Constitution). Who, then, is the bigger, or worse, traitor? Who’s act of treason occurred first in time? Who is the bigger criminal?

                  Lophatt, I was young enough to escape the draft, and I never joined the Armed Forces. (I was a screwed-up kid). I recall President Eisenhower’s Farewell Address, warning America of the “military-industrial complex.” I also remember President Kennedy’s speech against “secret societies,” delivered at the Waldorf-Astoria in April, 1961: “Ladies and Gentlemen, the very word ‘secrecy’ is abhorrent in a free and open society….” The two siren calls against carnage go hand-in-hand, in my humble opinion. You did what you believed you had to do. You are not responsible for the foreign policy of our politicians; You stood up for what you believed was right. Thank You for your service and God Bless you.

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  7. Hanoi Jane -fake Jane, her money spent on so many surgeries to look young and attractive, the other three seem to be more conservative in their looks, somewhat real, still these are old Hollywood hags no longer making the great marquee of seasons past. There’s no real comedy in these women, and Jane, her fancy clothes, her upscale lifestyle, I see nothing of the real communist in her, she doesn’t mingle with the women marching, no donations to the poor, NO EMOTIONS FOR THE WOUNDED WARRIORS, Jane is a product of children brought up in an empty world where love and compassion was only in a movie script.

    Liked by 5 people

  8. Just the trailer is beyond belief. African Americans are going to love the token Mammy or Aunt Jemima, updated as a fat-lady TSA agent who talks like Rochester, who’s apparently inserted in the film to imply negro acceptance of Hollywood’s kinky limousine liberals. It’s about as condescending as having an elderly black maid looking up from cleaning the dirty toilets in one of the star’s mansions to say, You go, girl. When the heck are blacks going to wake up and realize what Hollywood really thinks about them? The male characters are even more pathetic than the Aunt Jemima character from what little I see, playing their parts as if their love interests were gay men, which may be what appeals to narcisstic old crones with plasticized faces.

    Liked by 3 people

  9. Comrade Obama

    To see a person’s real character show me his heroes. Then show me those he hates. If he tolerates cancer, sexually transmitted diseases and the plague he will forgive Jane Fonda and her ilk. If he accommodates typhoid fever and hemorrhoids he will embrace Jane Fonda and call himself a Christian. You can bet they forgive Stalin, Marx and Hitler too.

    Liked by 3 people

  10. Jane Fonda handed a note given to her by an American POW back to her North Vietnamese Handlers. A more heartless, nasty, evil treasonous woman does not exist. Seeing the photo of her ass sitting on a north Vietnamese (Russian) anti aircraft gun makes me sick. Fuck Jane Fonda and all who make excuses for that treasonous bitch.

    Liked by 5 people

  11. I need to clarify my last comment concerning Jane Fonda. A good friend of mine was in the battle for Khe Sahn. It took knowing him for 20 years to get him to tell me how bad it was in Vietnam and how many Young Marines he loaded into body bags during that battle. I should have been even more direct expressing my views about that traitor than I was. My apologies.

    Liked by 4 people

  12. All four are 33rd degree flaming liberals. They have all trashed our country, supported Weinstein, attacked Conservatives and our President. I will save lots of money by not going to the movie. It has to be a very predictable movie. They bring shame for dignified women in their 70’s.

    Liked by 4 people

    • Glenn47 . . . . Bravo! “They bring shame for dignified woman in their 70’s.” that my dear was truly well spoken! Someone has to stand up for us ladies in our 70’s, and morally speaking, it certainly is not this crowd of misfits. I would never spend even a nickel to see any of the four of them. I cannot imagine a bigger “snoozeroo” than this particular movie.

      Liked by 4 people

      • Thank you Auntie, I think you and I are very close in age. So many, almost all of my male classmates, were drafted. I lost friends, we were a very close country school. Everyone knew everyone including parents. One dear young man was home on his furlough for a few weeks when we crossed paths,he rode up behind me on his motorcycle and offered me a ride when I was walking home. I didn’t recognize him because he had on a full face helmet. I declined and he took his helmet off and said don’t you recognize me? I was so happy to see him. We talked for awhile, it was amazing. He was a gunner on a helicopter, a few weeks later, he was gone. Anytime anyone dishonors our young men it infuriates me. The minute Fonda refused to pass on those notes, did it for me. I have never been able to forgive her,

        Liked by 3 people

  13. I enlisted in the Marine Corps in May of 1968 on what was know as the volunteer draft which meant 2 yrs active and 4 yrs in-active service with three friends, one whose name is on the wall. Another who came back to the world with visible PTSD. As for myself, I turned to alcohol and drugs for reasons I couldn’t explain.

    When I enlisted, I asked for duty in Vietnam. I had recently been divorced and had two children that my ex-wife and family refused to allow me to see. I believed by joining the Marines that I would be killed and my children would at least have my military benefits and life insurance. They did receive my military benefits, but for reason only GOD knows, they didn’t receive the life insurance.

    I married a beautiful Christian woman in 1972. I was not brought up in a Christian home and had no knowledge of Jesus or the love He offered. For the next 20 yrs I dealt with both alcohol and substance abuse hating the Vietnams people and America for what I believed was the injustice of what I conceived to be my problems. I would picture myself driving through a part of Orange County, CA known as “Little Saigon” holding an M16 out both windows set on full automatic a killing every Vietnamese I saw.

    In 1984, I had lost my business, my home, and almost my wife. I could explain why or what was the cause of my addictions, only that they were progressively getting worse and worse, to the point of becoming suicidal. After receiving our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ into my heart, I self-admitted into a Christian Recovery Hospital. I total I spent 7 months in that hospital and an additional 2 yrs with a psychiatrist who finally diagnosed my problems as PTSD. As I could not really remember much of my time in the “Nam” I sought help from the Veterans Administration in 1988 only to have my claim rejected. The reason for ejecting my claim and I quote “Since you had not filed a claim while in Vietnam or subsequent to your discharge you are not entitled to any benefits.” I relied on our Lord to help me, which He surely did. I again file a claim in 1998, again with the same exact wording as the first, only this time it was a handwritten message. The only reason to file the claim was to keep it active with the VA.

    It took me 40 years to admit to most people that I was a Vietnam Veteran. In 2009, a friend from my church noticed that my PTSD had started to resurface and asked for me to attend a local meeting of the “Vietnam Veterans of America”. At that meeting, I fell to my knees crying for reasons I could not explain, the next day I again filed a claim with the VA. Within 37 days I was approved for treatment for PTS at a 70% disability rate. I had hidden I my heart what had happened in Vietnam, even my best friend, my brother, whom I had joined the Marine didn’t know the extent of what I had done, found it hard to believe. It took almost one more year of group therapy with 15 other veterans with PTSD and searching the internet to finally find and realize what had happened so many years earlier.

    The reason for bringing this up is in 1972 I was sitting on my couch at home when the infamous story about “Hanoi” Jane Fonda came on the boob tube, with her sitting on that anti-aircraft gun, smiling big and pretty for her anti-American/Communist friends for all the world to see. I had gone through all the hate and loathing from other “Anti-American/Communist” people. The spitting, throwing of rocks, name-calling, even one driver trying to run me over on the sidewalk and my father greeting at the door of his business in Inglewood, CA, after walking the 6+ mile in uniform from LAX to his business downtown with “what the F*UCK are you doing here”.

    In 2011 I took part in the Huntington Beach, CA 4th of July parade, the largest 4th of July parades on the west coast. At the parade a felt the anger inside me towards those watching just which of them had protested the war in Vietnam our those who had severed their country with honor, bravery and ever their lives. It is still hard for me not to have those feelings today as it is with many of the men in my PTSD group. As for “Hanoi” Jane, to a man in that group have the exact same feeling of HATE and LOATHING for this “PIG Traitor”.

    PROUD UNITED STATES of AMERICA PATRIOT
    USMC Vietnam Veteran 68-69
    aka Hardtimes 3/9 3rd Mar Div

    Liked by 1 person

  14. One thing I forgot to include in my rant, I now live in am “Mobile Home” community with over a 75% of the residents being Vietnamese. I fly an American flag and a Marine Corps flag on a 26ft flag pole. Many of the people here had been in “Re-Educational” camps in Vietnam before coming to American. Mant of them treats me better the MANY Americans. They are a proud and caring people.

    PROUD UNITED STATES of AMERICA PATRIOT
    USMC Vietnam Veteran 68-69
    aka Hardtimes 3/9 3rd Mar Div

    Liked by 1 person

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