Sunday Devotional: Season of Lent begins

Genesis 2:7-9, 3:1-7

The LORD God formed man out of the clay of the ground
and blew into his nostrils the breath of life,
and so man became a living being.

Then the LORD God planted a garden in Eden, in the east,
and placed there the man whom he had formed.
Out of the ground the LORD God made various trees grow
that were delightful to look at and good for food,
with the tree of life in the middle of the garden
and the tree of the knowledge of good and evil.

Now the serpent was the most cunning of all the animals
that the LORD God had made.
The serpent asked the woman,
“Did God really tell you not to eat
from any of the trees in the garden?”
The woman answered the serpent:
“We may eat of the fruit of the trees in the garden;
it is only about the fruit of the tree
in the middle of the garden that God said,
‘You shall not eat it or even touch it, lest you die.'”
But the serpent said to the woman:
“You certainly will not die!
No, God knows well that the moment you eat of it
your eyes will be opened and you will be like gods
who know what is good and what is evil.”
The woman saw that the tree was good for food,
pleasing to the eyes, and desirable for gaining wisdom.
So she took some of its fruit and ate it;
and she also gave some to her husband, who was with her,
and he ate it.
Then the eyes of both of them were opened,
and they realized that they were naked;
so they sewed fig leaves together
and made loincloths for themselves.

Michelangelo's Temptation and Fall

The Fall of Adam and Eve is a mystery wrapped in a conundrum. For, having everything in that bucolic first garden, including and especially the unimaginably sublime gift of seeing and conversing with the Creator (Then the man and his wife heard the sound of the Lord God as he was walking in the garden in the cool of the day” –Genesis 3:8), they still chose disobedience and betrayal.

All because of the sin of grandiose narcissism — of wanting to be “like gods,” who will determine for themselves “what is good and what is evil” although they already knew right from wrong for, as the Book of Jeremiah 31:33 says, when God created humans, He placed His law within each of us, written in our very hearts.

But our first parents wanted to be their own gods, that is, with their own conception of right and wrong. And that is nothing other than a contravention of the First Commandment (“You shall have no other gods before me.” –Exodus 20:3). Another way to say “wanting to be their own gods” is “Do as thou wilt” — the motto of satanist Aleister Crowley and the church of Satan, and the zeitgeist of our time.

That first sin by our first parents was so cataclysmic that it fundamentally changed the natural order of the world.

A door was opened to chaos; henceforth a price must be paid for being human. Where once was joy and ease, there would be banishment, toil, pain, hardship, sickness, disease, and eventual death (“with painful labor you will give birth to children“; “by the sweat of your brow”; “for dust you are and to dust you will return”). Humankind’s relation with other creatures and the physical environment turned askew as “visible creation has become alien and hostile to man.” 

So cataclysmic is the breach that human nature itself became perverted. Henceforth, all of Adam’s progeny would be born “tinder for sin” (fomes peccati) with the stain of Original Sin, an inclination to evil. As St. Anselm lamented¹:

“I fell before my mother conceived me. Truly, in darkness I was conceived, and in the cover of darkness I was born. Truly, in him we all fell, in whom we all sinned. In him we all lost.”

¹St. Anselm: Basic Writings, translated by S. N. Deane (La Salle, Illinois: Open Court, 1961), p. 24.

So immense was our first parents’ Fall that only God Himself, in the person of the Son, could make amends — by becoming incarnate, only to be tortured, to suffer, and to die on a cross.

Jesus loves us this much

And so we come to Lent.

Since Jesus prepared Himself for His public ministry in 40 days, Christians imitate Him with prayer and fasting during this time of Lent to prepare for Holy Week. In remembrance of how Christ our Lord was tortured, suffered, and died for our sins, we are asked to make a sacrifice during Lent by surrendering something that gives us pleasure, and/or by doing something good that we don’t ordinarily do.

For Lent, I’m giving up chocolates. What are you giving up for Lent?

And may the love and peace of Jesus Christ our Lord be with you, always,

~Éowyn

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8 responses to “Sunday Devotional: Season of Lent begins

  1. Magnificent lesson for this Sabbath day! Thank you for your efforts.

    Liked by 3 people

  2. If anything is “given up for Lent” , it seems that it should be something, a behavior, habit, attitude, etc. that hurts us in body, soul or spirit and thus, not just “for Lent”. I can see where observing Lent is inferred from Scripture, but certainly is not commanded. I think given the message, it’s a message to celebrate the mercy and grace of God, so we may even indulge something as a celebration like more chocolate; dark chocolate which is healthy for our bodies. “Trust….in the Living God Who gives us freely all things to enjoy” –I Timothy 6:17

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Today, I wrote a poem describing the self-inflicted, inner torture one endures when stark reality exposes our inherent weakness. I am especially grateful for today’s devotional, it goes a long way toward explaining God’s never ending grace. I will give up eating dessert before and/or instead of my main dinner course for the whole of Lent. Thank you.

    Liked by 2 people

    • I am giving up chips. I have also asked Our Lord to help me with the physical suffering, that I may have more patience with it.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Do you mean ‘chips’ as in “chip buttie” or ‘chips’ as in with dip? Either way, that’s a tough one. There’s really no substitute for chip butties, but celery, crispy bacon rashers , are good for dips. Hang in there.

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  4. Instead of “giving up” something for Lent, I have instead added something. A study of 40 different titles for our Lord Jesus Christ; one for each day. A ministry called Reasons for Hope published it online. Only a few days in and I have found it a wonderful addition to my day; I recommend it highly. Anyone interested go to reasonsforhopejesus dot com and look for the “40 Titles 40 Days” on the home page.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Thank you Dr. Eowyn…beautiful devotional and reminder of the season of Lent.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Amen-Amein Brother in Christ Jesus-Yeshua!! God Bless all my Sisters and Brothers in Christ Jesus-Yeshua and Your Families and Friends!!

    Love Always and Shalom ( Peace ) Everyone, YSIC \o/

    Kristi Ann

    Liked by 2 people

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