Sunday Devotional: Who are our ‘neighbors’ and our ‘enemies’? How are we to ‘love’ them?

In Matthew 22:36-39, a Pharisee asked Jesus, “Master, which is the greatest commandment of the Law?”

Jesus said to him, “You must love the Lord your God with all your heart, with all your soul, and with all your mind. This is the greatest and the first commandment. The second resembles it: You must love your neighbor as yourself.

More than 14 years ago, after a journey that took some 10 years, I returned to Him. Since my coming home, I can honestly say I have loved the Lord, my God, with my whole heart, my whole soul, my whole mind, and with all my strength.

But, knowing all the foibles of fallen humanity — foibles of which I amply partake — and the darkness of the human heart, I have not been able to “love my neighbor as myself.” Knowing my own wretchedness, I don’t even love myself with my whole heart, my whole mind, and my whole soul!

To love my neighbor as myself is difficult enough. But in Matthew 5:43-48, Jesus tells us we must do even more:

“You have heard that it was said,
You shall love your neighbor and hate your enemy.
But I say to you, love your enemies
and pray for those who persecute you,
that you may be children of your heavenly Father,
for he makes his sun rise on the bad and the good,
and causes rain to fall on the just and the unjust.
For if you love those who love you, what recompense will you have?
Do not the tax collectors do the same?
And if you greet your brothers only,
what is unusual about that?
Do not the pagans do the same?
So be perfect, just as your heavenly Father is perfect.”

The above passages from Matthew 22 and Matthew 5 leave us with these questions:

  • Who are my “neighbors”?
  • What does “loving” my neighbors mean?
  • Who are my “enemies”?
  • What does “loving” my enemies mean?

Alas, most priests, if not all of the priests whom I’ve heard, don’t define or explain those terms — which is puzzling because the answers are given, of course, by Christ Himself.

In Luke 10:29-37, in response to the question “And who is my neighbor”, our Lord replied with the parable of the good Samaritan:

“A man fell victim to robbers as he went down to Jerusalem from Jericho. They stripped and beat him and went off leaving him half-dead. A priest happened to be going down that road, but when he saw him, he passed by on the opposite side. Likewise, a Levite came to the place, and when he saw him, he passed by on the opposite side. But a Samaritan traveler who came upon him was moved with compassion at the sight. He approached the victim, poured oil and wine over his wounds and bandaged them. Then he lifted him up on his own animal, took him to an inn, and cared for him. The next day he took out two silver coins and gave them to the innkeeper with the instruction, ‘Take care of him. If you spend more than what I have given you, I shall repay you on my way back.’ Which of these three, in your opinion, was neighbor to the robbers’ victim?” He answered, “The one who treated him with mercy.” Jesus said to him, “Go and do likewise.”

Note that Jesus did not identify the robbers as our “neighbors”. Our “neighbor” is the man who “fell victim to robbers” who himself had done no wrong.

In Leviticus 19:17-18, it is said:

“You shall not bear hatred for your brother or sister in your heart.
Though you may have to reprove your fellow citizen,
do not incur sin because of him.
Take no revenge and cherish no grudge against any of your people.
You shall love your neighbor as yourself.”

And so, Luke 10 and Leviticus 19 give us the definitions we need:

  1. From Luke 10’s parable of the good Samaritan, we learn that our “neighbor” is anyone we encounter in our lives, even strangers, who find themselves in foul circumstances through no fault of their own.
  2. From the parable of the good Samaritan, we learn that to “love our neighbor” means to treat those who are in need “with mercy,” that is, with kindness and compassion, and to provide assistance.
  3. But the “neighbor” in the parable of the good Samaritan was a man who fell victim to robbers through no fault of his own. What about people who find themselves in foul circumstances through their own fault? This is where “love your enemies” comes in.
  4. Our “enemies,” therefore, differ from our “neighbors” in that “enemies” are those who knowingly do wrong.
  5. That, in turn, implies that, unlike our neighbors, we are not to treat our enemies — those who knowingly do wrong — with mercy, kindness, compassion, and assistance.
  6. But we must still “love our enemies”. So how are we to love our enemies? As Leviticus 19:17-18 instructs, to love our enemies means that:
    1. We “rebuke” them: Rebuke is defined as “to criticize sharply“.
    2. We bear no hatred for them in our hearts.
    3. We do not seek revenge: Revenge is not the same as to mete out justice — revenge is defined as retaliation in kind or degree; to mete out justice is defined as “the maintenance or administration of what is just especially by the impartial adjustment of conflicting claims or the assignment of merited rewards or punishments”. (Just is defined as “morally upright or good”.) Unlike the impartial meting out of justice, “revenge” has an emotional component, which is where “hatred” comes in.
    4. We do not bear a grudge: Once justice is rendered, we let it go.
    5. We pray for them — that they repent and return to God.

Recognizing the above definitions, to “love” our “neighbors” and our “enemies” is a task that is neither simple nor easy. When we falter, just remember this:

Jesus loves us this much

Offered in humility and love,

~Eowyn

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13 responses to “Sunday Devotional: Who are our ‘neighbors’ and our ‘enemies’? How are we to ‘love’ them?

  1. Excellent lesson. Thanks for sifting through this so carefully. Truly appreciated.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. William Brandon Shanley

    How does one love thy neighbor if one does not love thyself? My ego’s critical function gets turned on me and on others. The closer I get to Jesus, the more critical the ego seems to become, some days leaving me in deep malaise or condition of hopelessness. How does one deal with such debilitating darkness?

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dear Will,

      No where in the Bible does God require moral perfection for us to love ourselves and our neighbors. It seems to me you might start loving yourself by being merciful with yourself, i.e., treat yourself with some kindness and compassion.

      And please let us know how we can help you, our brother and “neighbor”. How can we give you our mercy, kindness and compassion? I will pray for you!

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Love our enemies. Rebuke them for their crimes, as Jesus did: “You belong to your father, the devil, and you want to carry out your father’s desires. He was a murderer from the beginning, not holding to the truth, for there is no truth in him. When he lies, he speaks his native language, for he is a liar and the father of lies.” John 8:44

    Have no hatred, revenge, or grudge, for them, but do end their plundering fraudulent-reserve grift-machine and drive them to “Return.” “Jesus entered the temple courts and drove out all who were buying and selling there. He overturned the tables of the money changers and the benches of those selling doves.” Mat 21:12

    We can then pray for them there, from here.

    However, even from a far the “synagogue of Satan” (Rev. 2:9, 3:9) will continue to vex us and prosper in their machinations.

    An American citizen, not US subject.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. NO ONE could have been a better ACCOUNTANT, let alone lawyer, than Our Lord. And we know who opposed him from the start, and they oppose us still. We are to carry on, doing our best, until He checks us out of here or Comes Again.
    The Christian worldview and ethic is the only soothing balm available to us as individuals and as a race, because sin is the default position. We are also up against an evil and Anti-Christ system that only grows more savage with every passing year.
    I also find that the Christian Way of Life is not possible to live by natural means, and that it requires Grace. So we must not allow our enemies to either define our terms for us (or control the language of any debate), or to get us to examine our own motives (or have us submit to any sort of psychoanalysis or self-consciousness).

    Christianity, properly understood, is the ONLY PHENOMENON observed in the World where the more it is persecuted, the more it grows. This is why Jesus Our Lord IS the Leaven of the World, and we are to behave as the Salt of the Earth!

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Thanks for this one Dr. Eowyn. How timely you write on this as I have been pondering this subject for quite some time now. I have had a hard time with it, knowing the pure evil out there. How does one love and forgive that? Was I supposed to have compassion for the likes of Hillary. I could barely contain my wishing her a speedy trip to Hell; likewise her villainous peers. This is a hard one even if we don’t include these rotten politicians as most of us have had a neighbor that treads on our rights and sensibilities without remorse; i.e, parties with loud music at late hours, throwing trash over the fence, trees that are planted too close to fences therefore creating a mess and cleanup and on and on.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Pingback: KOMMONSENTSJANE -Sunday Devotional: Who are our ‘neighbors’ and our ‘enemies’? How are we to ‘love’ them? — Fellowship of the Minds | kommonsentsjane

  7. This post made me quite uncomfortable. And actually that is a good thing. You never really improve unless you venture beyond your comfort zone.
    Loving your neighbor as yourself can be difficult and loving your enemies even harder. But I have found I learn something from just about everybody. Some teach me how to act. And some teach me how not to act.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. TY, Dr. E. A thought provoking post. I need to read it over several times.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. wonderful devotional Dr. Eowyn!
    someone can turn from a “neighbor” to an “enemy” by embracing satan.
    I guess one can say Adam and Eve were the original “neighbors” and satan is the original “enemy” who brought sin into the Garden of Eden.
    satan deliberately managed to convince God’s children to commit sin and he continues to do so to this day.
    it is also interesting to note that in today’s time fewer people even know their “neighbors” (next door or anyone on the street), let alone love them…apathy reigns…
    we have a govt that is directly preventing Christians from providing counsel to troubled transgendered and homosexual people…I pray POTUS can overturn that. These are people who will most likely commit suicide unless a brother or sister of Christ can step in and help their neighbor, and our sinister govt prevents that help….truly evil.
    My prayers for all who hurt; who are in anguish; who rebel; who seek purpose, yet question its meaning; who bleed fear and see darkness instead of the light of joy; who need healing of the heart…..
    I pray for the Lord to wrap His arms around my “neighbors” and hold them, comfort them, feed their hearts and souls. I pray they feel His warmth and love and seek His face with repentant hearts. Amen.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Pingback: The Nazarene master teacher learning people how they should behave | Belgian Biblestudents - Belgische Bijbelstudenten

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