Actor Andrew Garfield longs to spread teachings of Christ, after making movie ‘Silence’

UPDATE (Jan. 11, 2017):

I just read a review of this movie in Crisis magazine. I withdraw my recommendation for Silence. From the review’s conclusion:

“Believers hoping for a film that explores Christian ideas from an authentic Christian context—should skip this one. Silence should also not be seen by the young, or those whose faith is not strong as the theology in this movie is complex, clever and seductive.”

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Here’s a ray of light from the wasteland of anti-Christian Hollywood.

He is Andrew Garfield, the actor who first got notice by playing Spiderman.

Garfield is starring in two new movies that are generating Oscar buzz:

  • Mel Gibson’s come-back-from-disgrace flick, Hacksaw Ridge, about a WWII heroic, Christian conscientious objector.
  • Martin Scorcese’s 40-years-in-the-making movie, Silence, about Jesuit missionaries in feudal Japan of the 1600s when Christianity was suppressed and Christian missionaries were hounded and killed. Movie critic Roger Friedman calls Silence “a Masterwork movie about faith and ideas,” “the Big Idea movie Hollywood has lacked for some time” which discusses “who we are and how we got here” and “who we can be. . . [i]n a world where religious persecution is more prevalent than ever.”

andrew-garfield-in-silence

Andrew Garfield, who was raised in a secular Jewish home, plays a Jesuit missionary in Silence.

He describes to The Hollywood Reporter the spiritual preparation he received from Fr. James Martin, who served as an advisor for the film, for portraying Portuguese priest Sebastião Rodrigues:

“He gave me spiritual direction as if I were a Jesuit in training. It became a very personal journey for me, a dual journey: It was me and Rodrigues, walking together, so that I could allow the events of the story to affect me in the way that a young, ambitious, intelligent, articulate, learned Jesuit would respond to being dropped into the front lines of the battle for Christianity.”

Fr. Martin led Garfield through the centuries-old Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius Loyola, the founder of the Jesuit order. Garfield said:

“It’s almost like a 12-step program. In fact, it’s the basis for a lot of 12-step programs: a longform meditation and prayer spent imagining the life of Christ, story by story, gospel by gospel, and sitting with his teachings, sitting with him as he discovers who he is in the wilderness, and really meditating upon his life and even crucifixion.”

Garfield said that by the time Silence began filming,

“I was filled up with all this information and all this longing to spread the teachings of Christ, which I truly started to adore.”

Silence will come out in theaters on December 23rd, just in time for Christmas. Here’s a trailer:

H/t Church POP

~Eowyn

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12 responses to “Actor Andrew Garfield longs to spread teachings of Christ, after making movie ‘Silence’

  1. There is hope again, I feel like it is only the beginning.

    Liked by 4 people

  2. Pingback: Actor Andrew Garfield longs to spread teachings of Christ, after making movie ‘Silence’ — Fellowship of the Minds | kommonsentsjane

  3. M Scorcese is a very complex person; I hope this movie brings clarity to his life.

    Liked by 2 people

  4. Thank you for saying this, Dr. Eowyn, because it would not have been on my radar. This is potentially great news!

    Liked by 4 people

  5. Could it be that all is not lost in Hollywood . . . what a great thing that would be for our country.

    God Bless America!

    Liked by 4 people

  6. At last a movie to look forward to. Hopefully it gets people thinking and potentially brings many back to the light. Rest assured though liberals will find a way to mock it. Auntie, you are right on the money!

    Liked by 3 people

  7. There has been some really good “Christian” movies out over the last couple of years. I liked the God’s not Dead movies and War room especially because that one really shows how powerful prayer is.

    Liked by 2 people

  8. I will make an effort to see this movie, if it hits the screens in New York. But Garfield is not 100% accurate in his assessment in St. Ignatius Loyola’s “Exercises”: The 12-Step program of Alcoholics Anonymous, which I am very familiar with, was more directly derived from the Oxford Movement. St. Ignatius may have had an influence of some sort upon some members of the Oxford Movement, but the Movement itself sprang from (still) anti-Catholic England.
    I have also read several of Dr. Makow’s posts (and those of other writers) who insisted that St. Ignatius Loyola was Jewish, or at least of Jewish origin. (Which may be true at least as his bloodline was concerned.) My concern about Garfield is this: How many people THINK they have Jesus Christ “down cold” when they only have a misconception of Him, filtered as it must be by the forces of modernism and post-modernism? It stands to reason: How many Catholics who follow the Vatican II sect believe that they have a real understanding of Traditional Catholicism, when they possess nothing of the sort? (The example comes to mind of the parish priest who announced to his congregation that he was “gay” only to be applauded by them for his “honesty!”) I keep coming back to this point and I keep harping on it for this reason: The ONE THING God CANNOT DO, according to His Divine Nature, is LIE. As He cannot Lie, He can neither deceive nor be deceived. I grew up during the changes that were implemented by the Crypto-Jew Montini, AKA Pope Paul VI, and this agenda and program WRECKED my Faith. It also left the Church in America and Europe a “Devastated Vineyard,” after Dr. Dietrich von Hildebrand’s book of the same title.
    Only now with old age before me have I had the opportunity to give it another shot, with the (so far uncensored internet) as my resource as to the history of the entire Debacle.
    My point is this: Both T.S. Eliot and Wallace Stevens believed they were after the truth. I think Eliot tried too hard to weave of his poetry a certain “theology” and failed, great poet that he was. But I think that Stevens, who stuck more or less to matters of phenomenology was the better poet, and he warned of a society (and this was back in the late 1940’s!) of the risks of not pursuing “the thing, but the concept of the thing.” As someone who grew up in a secular Jewish home, Garfield may have a genuine longing for true Discovery of Whom Jesus Christ is. But if he really is serious, he will look at the example of Mel Gibson, whom was almost destroyed by both Hollywood and his own lust. (This, after he went out and actually founded his own “Catholic” Church). So I would STRONGLY URGE Mr. Garfield to get his history absolutely spotless and correct, and understand that, if he is seriously on the road to Conversion, that, in the Public Eye, he WILL be persecuted.
    I would urge ANYBODY on the road to conversion (or at least during an honest investigation) to RESIST the promptings of the World to make of Jesus Christ something that He is NOT: “The World” does NOT want ANY of us saved: The World, corporately, is GOING TO HELL!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Steven,
      What makes you state that it was Mr. Gibson’s ‘own’ ‘Catholic’ Church? If I recall, he had an independent, traditional Catholic priest offering Mass at the chapel that he helped to build somewhere in California. I don’t recall the name of the town/city.

      Like

  9. Thank you Dr. Eowyn for this amazing post which brings us hope. I will look forward to watching this movie.

    Like

  10. I just read a review of this movie in Crisis magazine. I withdraw my recommendation for this movie. From the review’s conclusion:

    “Believers hoping for a film that explores Christian ideas from an authentic Christian context—should skip this one. Silence should also not be seen by the young, or those whose faith is not strong as the theology in this movie is complex, clever and seductive.”

    http://www.crisismagazine.com/2017/silence-many-martyrs-little-redemption

    Liked by 1 person

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